Brett Williams

AREAS OF INTEREST

Battery secondary use / second life
Climate Change
Electric Vehicles: hybrid, plug-in-hybrid, all-battery, fuel-cell
EV sales
Regulatory Policy
Transportation and the Environment
Vehicle-to-grid (V2G) and battery-to-grid (B2G) power
Workplace Charging

SELECTED BOOKS & PUBLICATIONS

Pricing Workplace Charging: Financial Viability and Fueling Costs

Revised: November 15, 2013

Overnight home charging is expected to be the most prevalent and cost-effective way to refuel plug-inelectric vehicles (PEVs). Workplace charging is also expected to play a prominent role and providevarious benefits, such as extending the number of electric miles driven and enabling PEV adoption bydrivers in difficult residential charging environments.

This research assesses workplace charging from two perspectives, 1) employers investing inworkplace-charging facilities and pricing their use and 2) employee drivers. It finds that pricing levelslikely to provide drivers with financial motivation to fuel at work relative to gasoline refueling mightprovide limited opportunity for station cost recovery. For example, a $0.20-per-kilowatt-hour markup ontop of average commercial electricity costs—a level some drivers may even find uncompetitive—mightonly cover $1,500 in all-in facility investment costs per PEV served. Similarly, drivers may balk atworkplace-charging prices at or exceeding $1.25/hour or $35/month, which provide comparable costrecoverypotential. Additionally, the differential, “discriminatory” impact of different pricing structures isdiscussed.

Across pricing structures, increasing facility utilization (i.e., increasing economies of scale in use)is key to improving financial viability. This might prove difficult, however, given associated costsdescribed herein. Solutions that increase utilization while minimizing per-vehicle costs (e.g.,“multiplexed,” perhaps lower-power facilities) might help address these constraints.

Monte Carlo simulation is presented to highlight key uncertainties of both station profitability andrefueling costs. Importantly, it indicates that employers’ choice of pricing structure will differentiallyaffect their ability to remain financially viable in the face of uncertainty.

Keywords: plug-in electric vehicle, workplace charging, pricing, recharging costs, profitability, cost recovery

California Plug-in Electric Vehicle (PEV) Registration Trends & Analysis: Dec 2010 – Dec 2012

By the end of 2012, there were over 26,000 light-duty PEVs on California roads representing $1 billion in gross revenues…

A new resource is now available here and on the UCLA Luskin Center EV Initiative's Market Dynamics page. This presentation includes facts and figures characterizing the California registration[1] of over 26,000 plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) during the period 12/1/2012 thru 12/31/2012.



[1] Based on analysis of registration data obtained from RL Polk & Co.

 

Plug-in Electric Vehicles: the First Three Years

With graphics upgraded and enhanced compared to previous versions, this resource compiles and analyzes the latest U.S. plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) sales data to answer pertinent questions:

* What types of EVs are on the market? What is the difference between an EV, a plug-in, and a hybrid? (typology, Venn diagram, and acronym soup)

* Where are we with PEVs? (cumulative sales by PEV type and model)

* How is the rate changing over time? (monthly sales by PEV type and model)

* How do PEVs compare to gasoline-only hybrids? (sales by year after introduction)

* What does the market look like? (market share and sales-weighted average characteristics)

http://evworld.com/evworld_audio/brett_williams.mp3
Program Director, Electric Vehicles & Alternative Fuels; Assistant Adjunct Professor of Public Policy
Public Policy
B.A., Physics / Public Policy Analysis, Pomona College (Claremont CA), thesis with distinction. M.Phil., Environment & Development, Cambridge University (UK), first-equivalent thesis. Business Development Certificate, Graduate School of Management, UC Davis. Ph.D., Transportation Technology & Policy, UC Davis.
310-267-5435

His blog can be viewed here.

Dr. Williams is the EV & Alt. Fuel Program Director at the UCLA Luskin Center for Innovation and an Assistant Adjunct Professor of Public Policy. At UCLA Luskin he is engaged in regional plug-in-electric-vehicle (PEV) readiness planning, assessing the challenges of charging at workplaces and in multi-unit dwellings, tracking PEV sales and expected supply, and comparing vehicle-to-grid (V2G) and repurposed PEV battery-to-grid (B2G) approaches to providing grid-support, energy-storage services.

Most recently a senior EV and energy researcher at UC Berkeley, he 1) explored electric­-fuel implementation with the California Energy Commission, 2) analyzed the energy and GHG impacts of real-world, household use of plug-in and fuel-cell vehicles with Toyota, and 3) investigated PEV battery secondary use.

He received a Ph.D. in Transportation Technology & Policy from UC Davis exploring early market development for plug-­in/plug-­out hybrid and fuel-cell vehicles and vehicle-to-­grid power. While at UC Davis, he taught graduate and undergraduate courses, earned a business-development certificate from the Graduate School of Management, worked for Ford, and received NSF IGERT, DOE GATE, UC Transportation Center, and Eno Foundation fellowships.

Previously, he was a senior analyst for Amory Lovins at the Rocky Mountain Institute, a nonprofit think-tank. There he helped spin off Hypercar, Inc. (now Fiberforge), consulted for automotive and energy firms, and joined the delegation to the 1999 G8 Environmental Futures Summit.

Brett Williams

Headshot: 
First Name: 
Brett
Last Name: 
Williams
Position: 
Program Director, Electric Vehicles & Alternative Fuels; Assistant Adjunct Professor of Public Policy
Degrees: 
B.A., Physics / Public Policy Analysis, Pomona College (Claremont CA), thesis with distinction. M.Phil., Environment & Development, Cambridge University (UK), first-equivalent thesis. Business Development Certificate, Graduate School of Management, UC Davis. Ph.D., Transportation Technology & Policy, UC Davis.
Bio: 

His blog can be viewed here.

Dr. Williams is the EV & Alt. Fuel Program Director at the UCLA Luskin Center for Innovation and an Assistant Adjunct Professor of Public Policy. At UCLA Luskin he is engaged in regional plug-in-electric-vehicle (PEV) readiness planning, assessing the challenges of charging at workplaces and in multi-unit dwellings, tracking PEV sales and expected supply, and comparing vehicle-to-grid (V2G) and repurposed PEV battery-to-grid (B2G) approaches to providing grid-support, energy-storage services.

Most recently a senior EV and energy researcher at UC Berkeley, he 1) explored electric­-fuel implementation with the California Energy Commission, 2) analyzed the energy and GHG impacts of real-world, household use of plug-in and fuel-cell vehicles with Toyota, and 3) investigated PEV battery secondary use.

He received a Ph.D. in Transportation Technology & Policy from UC Davis exploring early market development for plug-­in/plug-­out hybrid and fuel-cell vehicles and vehicle-to-­grid power. While at UC Davis, he taught graduate and undergraduate courses, earned a business-development certificate from the Graduate School of Management, worked for Ford, and received NSF IGERT, DOE GATE, UC Transportation Center, and Eno Foundation fellowships.

Previously, he was a senior analyst for Amory Lovins at the Rocky Mountain Institute, a nonprofit think-tank. There he helped spin off Hypercar, Inc. (now Fiberforge), consulted for automotive and energy firms, and joined the delegation to the 1999 G8 Environmental Futures Summit.

Phone Number: 
310-267-5435
For Admins Only