"Childcare Access and Employment among Women with Preschool-Aged Children in Tokyo" with Mizuki Kawabata

"Childcare Access and Employment among Women with Preschool-Aged Children in Tokyo" with Mizuki Kawabata
Wednesday, March 5, 2014 - 12:30pm - 2:00pm
12:30 pm
2:00 pm
Department of Urban Planning
Public Affairs Building 2355
337 Charles E Young Drive East Room 235
Los Angeles, CA 90095
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Date: 
Wed, 03/05/2014 - 12:30pm - 2:00pm
Presented By: 
Department of Urban Planning

Location

Public Affairs Building 2355
337 Charles E Young Drive East Room 235
Los Angeles, CA 90095
United States

This study examines childcare accessibility and the importance of access to childcare in attaining preferred employment among women with preschool-aged children in Tokyo. The age-wise childcare accessibility takes into account spatial variations in the supply and demand of childcare, as well as “spatial competition,” based on spatially micro areas--blocks. The accessibility reveals a considerable geographic mismatch between childcare center supply and demand, particularly for children aged up to two years.

This study examines childcare accessibility and the importance of access to childcare in attaining preferred employment among women with preschool-aged children in Tokyo. The age-wise childcare accessibility takes into account spatial variations in the supply and demand of childcare, as well as “spatial competition,” based on spatially micro areas--blocks. The accessibility reveals a considerable geographic mismatch between childcare center supply and demand, particularly for children aged up to two years. Empirical results show that access to childcare is closely associated with a higher probability of attaining preferred employment among women with preschool-aged children. The association is remarkably strong when a woman has a very young child aged up to two years and when the childcare center is one that is desired. Adequate childcare provision, particularly for children under the age of three, helps to augment active female participation in the labor market.

Mizuki Kawabata is an Associate Professor of Economics at Keio University in Tokyo, where she teaches courses on GIS, economic geography, and urban and regional policy. Her research centers on (1) understanding and developing solutions to socioeconomic issues relating to urban spatial structure and (2) GIS applications and education. She received her Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees from Keio University, and Ph.D. in Urban and Regional Planning from MIT. When she was a doctoral student, she was a visiting researcher at UCLA. She was previously an Associate Professor in the Center for Spatial Inforrmation Science at the University of Tokyo.

Dr. Kawabata’s visit is made possible with support from a grant form the Hiroshi Wagatsuma Memorial Fund.  Please RSVP here.