UCLA Luskin Study Finds No Link Between Pot Dispensaries and Increased Crime

UCLA Luskin Study Finds No Link Between Pot Dispensaries and Increased Crime

Posted on

Wed, 06/06/2012 - 4:21pm

A common perception that medical marijuana dispensaries boost the crime rate in areas where they exist may not stand up to scrutiny, according to a recent study by UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs researchers.

While law enforcement supports this view, citing a 2009 California Police Chief’s report, the report’s authors indicate the lack of substantiating evidence on either side. Bridget Freisthler, associate professor of social welfare at the Luskin School, and Luskin graduate student Nancy Kepple, studied crime rates in nearly 100 areas of Sacramento and did not find an increase in crime in those areas.

In a story posted in U.S. News and World Report, Freisthler and Kepple say their findings are the starting point for continued study of the long-term impacts of marijuana dispensaries on communities. The report is published in the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs.

The study was funded by the National Institute of Drug Abuse at the National Institutes of Health.

Read the U.S. News and World Report story

A common perception that medical marijuana dispensaries boost the crime rate in areas where they exist may not stand up to scrutiny, according to a recent study by UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs researchers.