Brian D. Taylor

Brian D. Taylor

Professor of Urban Planning; Director, Lewis Center for Regional Policy Studies; Director, Institute of Transportation Studies

Education:

PhD, Urban Planning, UCLA (1992);
MCP, City and Regional Planning, UC Berkeley (1988);
MS, Civil Engineering, UC Berkeley (1986);
BA, Geography, UCLA (1983)

Areas of Interest:

Demographics, Equity, Finance, History, Politics, Public Transit, Transportation, Travel Behavior

Phone:

(310) 903-3228

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Email:

btaylor@ucla.edu

Office Location:

3320H

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Brian Taylor’s research centers on transportation policy and planning – most of it conducted in close collaboration with his many exceptional students.  His students have won dozens of local and national awards for their work, and today hold positions at the highest levels of planning analysis, teaching, and practice. More of his students have won awards from the Council of University Transportation Centers for the best capstone project, thesis, or dissertation in transportation policy and planning than have the students of any other faculty member in North America.

Professor Taylor explores how society pays for transportation systems and how these systems in turn serve the needs of people who – because of low income, disability, location, or age – have lower levels of mobility.  Topically, his research examines travel behavior, transportation economics & finance, and politics & planning.

His research on travel behavior has examined (1) the effect of travel experience on cognitive mapping, (2) how travel patterns vary by race/ethnicity, sex, age, and income, (3) the emerging travel patterns teens and young adults, (4) gender divisions of labor and travel in gay and straight households, (5) the social, economic, and spatial factors explaining public transit use, (6) the role of walking, waiting, and transferring on travel choices, (7) ways to cost-effectively increase public transit use, and (8) the role of information technology in the rise of new shared mobility systems.

A principal focus of his research is the politics of transportation economics & finance, including (1) alternative ways to evaluate the access and economic effects of traffic congestion on people, firms, and regional economies, (2) the history of freeway planning and finance, (3) emerging trends in pricing road use, (4) the equity of alternative forms of transportation pricing and finance, (5) linking of subsidies to public transit performance, and (6) measuring equity in public transit finance.

The politics of planning practice inform Professor Taylor’s research and teaching, which regularly include courses on Transportation and Land Use: Urban FormTransportation Policy and Planning, Transportation Economics, Finance, and Policy, courses in research design for planners, and, occasionally, the Comparative International Transportation Workshop. Prior to joining the UCLA faculty in 1994, Professor Taylor was on the planning faculty at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and before that he was a planner with Metropolitan Transportation Commission in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Professor Taylor has won numerous honors for his work. He was recently named one of the Top Ten Academic Thought Leaders in Transportation by the Council of University Transportation Centers and the Eno Center for Transportation. He was also recently honored as a National Associate by the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine for his work on behalf of the Transportation Research Board.  And he was recently elected to the College of Fellows by the American Institute of Certified Planners for his exceptional contributions to planning and society.

Selected Books and Publications

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Research Interests

  • Incarcerated youth and identity transitions
  • The transition to adulthood among formerly incarcerated youth and youth aging out of foster care
  • Contextual influences on youth mental health and psychosocial functioning
  • Qualitative and mixed methods research
  • Gender studies
  • Critical race theory and social work education

Courses