Natalie Bau

Natalie Bau is an assistant professor of public policy at the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs. She is an economist studying topics in development and education economics and is particularly interested in the industrial organization of educational markets. She has studied private schooling and teacher compensation in Pakistan, the relationship between negotiation skills and girls’ educational outcomes in Zambia, and the interactions between educational investment and cultural traditions in Indonesia, Zambia, and Ghana.

Dr. Bau received her PhD in public policy from Harvard University, and is currently an affiliate of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research and the Centre for Economic Policy and Research.  Prior to joining UCLA, she was an assistant professor of economics at the University of Toronto.

Personal Academic Website.

Marcia Rosalie Hale

Marcia Hale works in the areas of identity and water conflicts, with a particular emphasis on harnessing natural resource governance toward resolving and preventing protracted violent conflict. Her dissertation research is concerned with the role urban water systems play in regional security. Marcia has conducted research on the system of water governance in Los Angeles for UCLA’s Center for Sustainable Communities; consulted with Mediators Beyond Borders International on program development; and has worked with the Liberty Hill Foundation on city-level environmental justice policy. She is a practicing mediator specializing in identity and family conflicts, as well as restorative justice. With a BA from UCLA in international development and a master’s in urban planning, she is currently a PhD candidate completing her dissertation research on urban water systems in Mediterranean climates, including Athens, Istanbul and Los Angeles.

Michael A. Stoll

Michael A. Stoll is Professor of Public Policy in the Luskin School of Public Affairs at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). He serves as a Fellow at the American Institutes for Research, the Brookings Institution, the Institute for Research on Poverty at University of Wisconsin, Madison, and the National Poverty Center at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and served as a past Visiting Scholar at the Russell Sage Foundation.

Dr. Stoll’s published work explores questions of poverty, labor markets, migration, and crime. His past work includes an examination of the labor market difficulties of less-skilled workers, in particular the role that racial residential segregation, job location patterns, job skill demands, employer discrimination, job competition, transportation, job information and criminal records play in limiting employment opportunities.

His recent work examines the labor market consequences of mass incarceration and the benefits and costs of the prison boom. A recently completed book, Why Are so Many Americans in Prison, explores the causes of the American prison boom and what to do about it to insure both low crime and incarceration rates.

Much of his work has been featured in a variety of media outlets including NPR, PBS, the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, The Economist, Chicago Tribune, San Francisco Chronicle, and Washington Post, ABC, NBC, CBS, Univision, among other outlets.  He also regularly advises the U.S. Departments of Health and Human Services and Labor, as well as for state and local governments in various capacities.

Prof. Stoll received his Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and a B.S. from the University of California, Berkeley.

RECENT BOOKS

 

SELECTED BOOKS & PUBLICATIONS

Why are So Many Americans in Prison? jointly authored with Steven Raphael, New York, NY: Russell Sage Foundation, 2013.

Do Prisons Make Us Safer? The Benefits and Costs of the Prison Boom
edited with Steven Raphael, New York, NY: Russell Sage Foundation, 2009

Barriers to Reentry? The Labor Market for Released Prisoners in Post-Industrial America edited with David Weiman and Shawn Bushway, New York, NY: Russell Sage Foundation, 2007 (Selected as a Noteworthy Book in Industrial Relations by Princeton University’s Industrial Relations Section.)

Wes Yin

Wes Yin is an associate professor in the Department of Public Policy and the Anderson School of Management at UCLA, and is a Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research. Prior to coming to UCLA, Yin served as Acting Assistant Secretary of Economic Policy at the Department of Treasury, and as a Senior Economist in the White House Council of Economic Advisers. He also taught at Boston University and the University of Chicago, and was a Robert Wood Johnson Scholar in Health Policy at Harvard University.

Yin’s research interests are in the areas of health, economic development, consumer and public finance. His current research studies the relationship between economic growth and the formation of private markets; and how information, income, and competitive forces impact the delivery of health care in developed and developing countries.

 

PUBLISHED AND FORTHCOMING ECONOMICS PAPERS

Insurers’ Negotiating Leverage and the External Effect of Medicare Part D (with Darius Lakdawalla), Review of Economics and Statistics,  97:2 p.314-331 May 2015 (an earlier version appears as NBER working paper no. 16251)

R&D Policy, Agency Costs and Innovation in Personalized Medicine, Journal of Health Economics, September 2009, 28(5), pp. 950-962

Market Incentives and Pharmaceutical Innovation, Journal of Health Economics, July 2008, 27(4), pp. 1060-1077

Female Empowerment: Impact of a Commitment Savings Product in the Philippines (with Nava Ashraf and Dean Karlan) World Development, 2010, 38(3), pages 333-344

Tying Odysseus to the Mast: Evidence from a Commitment Savings Product in the Philippines (with Nava Ashraf and Dean Karlan) Quarterly Journal of Economics, May 2006, 121(2). Winner of TIAA-CREF 2006 Certificate of Excellence

Designing Targeting Schemes with Poverty Maps: Does Disaggregation Help? (with Berk Özler, Chris Elbers, Tomoki Fujii, Peter Lanjouw), Journal of Development Economics, May 2007, 83(1)

Deposit Collectors (with Nava Ashraf and Dean Karlan), Advances in Economic Analysis & Policy, March 2006, 6(2), Article 5

 

WORKING PAPERS

The Market for High-Quality Medicine: Retail Chain Entry and Drug Quality in India (with Daniel Bennett) [Appendix]

Information Barriers in Health Care Decision-Making: Experimental Evidence from the California Health Benefits Exchange (with Richard Domurat and Isaac Menashe)

 

PUBLISHED POLICY AND MEDICAL JOURNAL ARTICLES

Strengthening Risk Protection through Private Long-Term Care Insurance. Hamilton Project, Discussion Paper 2015-06, June 2015

Value of Survival Gains in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (with John Penrod, J. Ross Maclean, Darius Lakdawalla and Tomas Philipson) American Journal of Managed Care 2012 Nov;18(11 Suppl):S257-64

The impact of Medicare Part D on Medicare-Medicaid Dual-eligible Beneficiaries’ Prescription Utilization and Expenditures (with Caleb Alexander and Anirban Basu), Health Services Research, February 2010, 45(1), pp. 133-151   

Valuing health technologies at NICE: Recommendations for Improved Incorporation of Treatment Value in HTA (with Dana Goldman, Darius Lakdawalla and Tomas Philipson) Health Economics October 2010, 10(11) pp. 1109-1116

The Effect of the Medicare Part D Prescription Benefit on Drug Utilization and Expenditures (with Anirban Basu, James Zhang, Atonu Rabbani, David Meltzer, Caleb Alexander) Annals of Internal Medicine, Lead article, February 2008, 148:3 pp. 169-177

Solutions and Challenges to Curing Global Health Inequality Innovations 2(4), October 2007, 2(4), pp. 72-80

Impact of the Medicare Part D prescription benefit on use of generic drugs and different therapeutic drug classes (with James Zhang and Caleb Alexander) The Journal of General Internal Medicine, October 2008, 23:10 pp. 1673-1678

Testing Savings Product Innovations Using an Experimental Methodology (with Nava Ashraf and Dean Karlan), Asian Development Bank, Economics and Research Department Technical Paper No. 8. November, 2003

A Review of Commitment Savings Products in Developing Countries (with Nava Ashraf, Nathalie Gons and Dean Karlan), Asian Development Bank, Economics and Research Department Working Paper No. 45 June, 2003

 

CURRENT TEACHING

Econometrics (MPP Core) (PP208)

Health Care Finance and Management (MBA and MPP elective) (MGMT298 & PP290)

 

FILE DOWNLOADS

 

 

Manisha Shah

Manisha Shah is Vice-Chair and Professor of Public Policy at the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs. She is also a Faculty Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research, a Faculty Affiliate at UC Berkeley’s Center for Effective Global Action,  The Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab, and The Bureau for Research and Economic Analysis of Development, and a Research Fellow at the Institute for the Study of Labor. She received her Ph.D. in agricultural and resource economics from UC Berkeley.

Shah is a development economist whose primary research and teaching interests lie at the intersection of applied microeconomics, health, and development.  She has written several papers on the economics of sex markets in order to learn how more effective policies and programs can be deployed to slow the spread of HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted infections.  She also works in the area of child health and education. Shah has been the PI on various impact evaluations and randomized controlled trials and is currently leading projects in Tanzania, Indonesia, and India. She has also worked extensively in Ecuador and Mexico. Her research has been supported by Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the World Bank, and the National Science Foundation among others.

Google Scholar Citations

Published and Forthcoming Articles

Decriminalizing Prostitution: Implications for Sexual Violence and Public Health (with S. Cunningham), NBER Working Paper 20281. The Review of Economic Studies, July 2018, 85(3):1683–1715.
Selected Media Coverage: Vox, Slate, Washington Post, WSJ, LA Weekly, UCLA, KCRW interview, WHYY show, Seriouspod Podcast

Drought of Opportunities: Contemporaneous and Long Term Impacts of Rainfall Shocks on Human Capital (with B. Steinberg),  Journal of Political Economy, April 2017, 125(2).
Blog about paper: Ideas for India

Risk-Taking Behavior in the Wake of Natural Disasters  (with L. Cameron), Journal of Human Resources, Spring 2015, 50(2): 484-515.
Media Coverage: The Huffington Post

Can Mistargeting Destroy Social Capital and Stimulate Crime? Evidence from a Cash Transfer Program in Indonesia (with L. Cameron), Economic Development and Cultural Change, January 2014, 62(2): 381-415.

Do Sex Workers Respond to Disease? Evidence from the Male Market for Sex,  American Economic Review Papers & Proceedings, 2013, 103(3): 445-50.

Intra-household Resource Allocation: Do Parents Reduce or Reinforce Child Cognitive Ability Gaps? (with P. Frijters, D. Johnston, and M. Shields), Demography, December 2013, 50:6.

Compensated for Life: Sex Work and Disease Risk (with R. Arunachalam),  Journal of Human Resources, Spring 2013, 48:345-369.

Face Value: Information and Signaling in an Illegal Market (with T. Logan), Southern Economic Journal. 2013. 79(3), 529-564.

Handedness, Health and Cognitive Development: Evidence from Children in the NLSY (with D. Johnston, M. Nicholls, and M. Shields), Journal of the Royal Statistical Society, Series A (Statistics in Society), 2012. 

The Prostitute’s Allure: The Return to Beauty in Commercial Sex Work (with R. Arunachalam), B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, 2012.

Sex Work and Infection: What’s Law Enforcement Got to Do with it? (with P. Gertler), Journal of Law and Economics, November 2011, 54.
Media Coverage: The Economist

To Work or Not to Work? Child Development and Maternal Labor Supply (with P. Frijters, D. Johnston, and M. Shields), American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, July 2009, 1(3): 97-110.

Nature’s Experiment? Handedness and Early Childhood Development  (with D. Johnston, M. Nicholls, and M. Shields), Demography, May 2009, 46(2): 281-302.

Prostitutes and Brides? (with R. Arunachalam),  American Economic Review Papers & Proceedings, May 2008, 98(2), 516-522.

Risky Business: The Market for Unprotected Commercial Sex (with P. Gertler and S. Bertozzi),  Journal of Political Economy, June 2005, 113(3), 518-550.
Media Coverage: NYTimes, Slate

Books and Handbook Chapters

The Oxford Handbook of the Economics of Prostitution. Scott Cunningham and Manisha Shah, editors. Oxford University Press, 2016.

Sex Work and Risky Sex in Developing Countries, In: Anthony J. Culyer (editor), Encyclopedia of Health Economics, Vol 3. San Diego: Elsevier; 2014. pp. 311-315.

Sex Work, with V. Rao, In The New Oxford Companion to Economics in India (Kaushik Basu and Annemie Maertens, editors), Delhi: Oxford University Press, Delhi, 2012.

Working Papers (Please email for most recent version)

How Does Health Promotion Work? Evidence From The Dirty Business of Eliminating Open Defecation (with P. Gertler, M. Alzua, L. Cameron, S. Martinez, and S. Patil). NBER Working Paper 20997.

Workfare and Human Capital Investment: Evidence from India (with B. Steinberg), NBER Working Paper 21543. revise and resubmit Journal of Human Resources
Media Coverage: NBER Digest

Scaling Up Sanitation: Evidence from an RCT in Indonesia (with L. Cameron and S. Olivia), 2016.

Crimes against Morality: Unintended Consequences of Criminalizing Sex Work (with L. Cameron and J. Muz), 2016

Technical Reports  

Impact Evaluation of a Large-Scale Rural Sanitation Project in Indonesia (with L. Cameron and S. Olivia), World Bank Policy Research Paper 6360, February 2013.

Scaling Up Rural Sanitation: Findings from the Impact Evaluation Baseline Survey in Indonesia (with L. Cameron), Water and Sanitation Project Technical Paper, November 2010.

Allen J. Scott

For the last several years, Professor Scott’s research has been focused on issues of industrialization, urbanization, and regional development. This research has involved extensive theoretical and empirical work. On the theoretical front, Dr. Scott has written numerous pieces on the interrelations between industrial organization, technology, local labor markets, and location, with particular reference to the phenomenon of agglomeration economies. He also has carried out a large number of studies of individual industrial sectors in the United States, Europe and Asia.

Most recently, he has been researching the origins and development of high-technology industry in Southern California, and the policy predicaments thrown into relief by the recent crisis of the region’s aerospace-defense industry in the post-Cold War era. Professor Scott has served as a member of the Los Angeles County Economic Development Commission’s Aerospace Task Force. He also has been engaged in the formulation of a variety of economic development strategies for Southern California, including the setting up of an electric vehicle industry and an advanced ground transportation industry.

A Fellow of the Royal Statistical Society and a Guggenheim and Fulbright Fellow, Dr. Scott has been a visiting scholar at Zhongshan University in the People’s Republic of China, the University of Paris, the University of Hong Kong and the University of Sao Paulo. From 1990 to 1995 he was director of the Lewis Center for Regional Policy Studies at UCLA. He formerly served as Associate Dean of the School of Public Policy and Social Research.

Susanne Lohmann

Susanne Lohmann is Professor of Political Science and Public Policy and Director of the Jacob Marschak Interdisciplinary Colloquium on Mathematics in the Behavioral Sciences at UCLA.

Professor Lohmann received her Ph.D. in economics and political economy from Carnegie Mellon University in 1991. She taught at Stanford University’s Graduate School of Business before joining UCLA in 1993. Professor Lohmann was John M. Olin Fellow at Carnegie Mellon University; Alfred P. Sloan Fellow, also at Carnegie Mellon University; James and Doris McNamara Fellow at Stanford University; John M. Olin Fellow at the University of Southern California; Fellow of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences; and Fellow of the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation

Professor Lohmann’s articles on collective action and central banking have appeared in American Economic Review, American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, World Politics,International Organization and other leading social science journals. Her current research focus is the political economy of research universities and higher education. She is completing a book titled How Universities Think: The Hidden Work of a Complex Institution, which is under contract with Cambridge University Press.

Professor Lohmann teaches courses on ethics and governance. Her online course on “Diversity, Disagreement, and Democracy” embeds mini games of cooperation, competition, coordination and collaboration in a massively multiplayer game of life. She is the recipient of two teaching awards.

Daniel J.B. Mitchell

Daniel J.B. Mitchell is Ho-su Wu professor at the Anderson Graduate School of Management and the School of Public Affairs, U.C.L.A. Within the latter school, he chaired the Department of Policy Studies during 1996-97. Prof. Mitchell was formerly director of the U.C.L.A. Institute of Industrial Relations (1979-90) and continues to serve on the Institute’s advisory committee.

During Phase II of the federal wage/price controls program of the early 1970s, Prof. Mitchell was chief economist of the Pay Board, the agency that administered wage controls. He was twice associated with the Brookings Institution in Washington, D.C., including a stint as a senior fellow in the economic studies program (1978-79), and participated in several Brookings-sponsored research projects. Professional activities have included memberships on the Executive Boards of the Industrial Relations Research Association (both national and Southern California), the North American Economics and Finance Association, and the Institute of Industrial Relations Association. Prof. Mitchell is the immediate past president of the North American Economics and Finance Association. He has also served on the nominating committee of the American Economic Association and on the editorial boards of various academic journals. He is editor of a book series on workplace studies published by M.E. Sharpe, Inc. and began a term as co-editor of the journal Industrial Relations in 1997.

Prof. Mitchell regularly served as a member of the Human Resource Forecast Panel while it operated at the Conference Board and later at U.C.L.A. He is a member of the International Industrial Relations Association and chairs one of its study groups (Pay Systems). At UCLA, he was co-director and then director (1999-2000) of the UCLA Anderson Business Forecasting Project. As a faculty member at UCLA, he has created a course on “California Policy Issues” (now co-taught with former presidential candidate and Massachusetts Governor Michael Dukakis), now a core course of the minor in Public Affairs. Prof. Mitchell has served as a consultant to the Congressional Budget Office, the Federal Reserve Board, the President’s Council on Wage and Price Stability, the U.S. Department of Labor, and the International Labour Organisation. His publications have generally been in the areas of wage determination, wage-price controls, concession bargaining, flexible pay plans, non-wage employee benefits, use of labor-market data, labor standards in international trade, and other aspects of labor-market analysis. Prof. Mitchell is the author of Pensions, Politics, and the Elderly: Historic Social Movements and Their Lessons for Our Aging Society (M.E. Sharpe, 2000).

The book uses California’s colorful experience with “pensionite” movements of the state’s seniors during the period from the 1920s through the 1940s to draw implications for the upcoming retirement of the baby boom. Prof. Mitchell has two children and resides in Santa Monica, California with his wife Alice.

SELECTED BOOKS & PUBLICATIONS

“Pensions, Politics, and the Elderly”
ME Sharpe, 2000

Sarah Reber

Bio

I am an Associate Professor of Public Policy at the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs. I received my Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University in 2003. From 2003 to 2005, I was a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Scholar in Health Policy Research at UC Berkeley.

My research in education focuses on understanding the educational, social, and fiscal effects—both intended and unintended—of some of the most important policies of the 20th century: school desegregation, the Civil Rights Act, and the massive expansion of federal aid to K-12 education that Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act represented. In addition, I am conducting a randomized field experiment of two interventions designed to increase college enrollment among disadvantaged students.

My research in health economics examines the advantages and disadvantages of promoting competition in health insurance markets.

Affiliations

Research Associate, National Bureau of Economic Research
Faculty Affiliate, California Center for Population Research
Faculty Affiliate, California Policy Lab

More information about her research and teaching can be found at sarahreber.com.