Emily Weisburst

I am an Assistant Professor of Public Policy at the Luskin School of Public Affairs at the University of California, Los Angeles. My research focuses on topics in labor economics and public finance, including criminal justice and education.

I recently earned my Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Texas at Austin. While in graduate school, I worked as a Staff Economist at the Council of Economic Advisers in the Executive Office of the President and as a research associate for the RAND Corporation on joint projects with the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. I have also received the NAED Spencer Dissertation Fellowship to support my research on the impact of funding for police in public schools on student disciplinary outcomes and educational attainment in Texas.

My research interests include understanding factors that impact police decision-making and public trust in police. I am also interested in how interactions with the criminal justice system affect individuals, families and communities. A recent paper examines how much police discretion matters to law enforcement outcomes, after accounting for offense context. In this project, I find that the likelihood that an incident results in an arrest critically depends on the officer that shows up to respond to an offense reported through a police call for service.

For more information about my work, check out my website: emilyweisburst.com

Natalie Bau

Natalie Bau is an assistant professor of public policy at the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs. She is an economist studying topics in development and education economics and is particularly interested in the industrial organization of educational markets. She has studied private schooling and teacher compensation in Pakistan, the relationship between negotiation skills and girls’ educational outcomes in Zambia, and the interactions between educational investment and cultural traditions in Indonesia, Zambia, and Ghana.

Dr. Bau received her PhD in public policy from Harvard University, and is currently an affiliate of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research and the Centre for Economic Policy and Research.  Prior to joining UCLA, she was an assistant professor of economics at the University of Toronto.

Personal Academic Website.

Meredith Phillips

Phillips studies the causes and consequences of educational inequality. She specializes in the causes of ethnic and socioeconomic disparities in educational success and how to reduce those disparities. Her current research projects include a random-assignment evaluation of the efficacy of two low-cost college access interventions; an ethnographic longitudinal study of adolescent culture, families, schools, and academic achievement; an analysis of classroom environment surveys; and a study of promising school-based practices for improving students’ achievement.

Phillips co-founded EdBoost, a charitable, educational non-profit whose mission is to reduce educational inequality by making high-quality supplemental educational services accessible to children from all family backgrounds. EdBoost develops and refines interventions and curriculum at its learning center, implements interventions in educational settings, and then tests promising interventions using rigorous evaluations. Phillips also co-founded the Los Angeles Education Research Institute (LAERI), a Los Angeles-based research-practice partnership that collaborates with L.A. Unified.

Phillips currently serves on the National Academy Committee on Developing Indicators of Educational Equity. She previously served on the National Academy Committee on the Evaluation Framework for Successful K-12 STEM Education. Phillips is a past recipient of a National Academy of Education/Spencer Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship as well as the dissertation award from the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM). She received her Ph.D. from Northwestern University and her A.B. from Brown University.

Google Scholar Citations

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS

Using Research to Improve College Readiness: A Research Partnership between the Los Angeles Unified School District and and the Los Angeles Education Research Institute
Author: Phillips, Meredith, Kyo Yamashiro, Adina Farrukh, Cynthia Lim, Katherine Hayes, Nicole Wagner, Hansheng Chen

Parenting, Time Use, and Disparities in Academic Outcomes
Author: Phillips, Meredith

Ethnic and Social Class Disparities in Academic Skills: Their Origins and Consequences
Author: Phillips, Meredith

Culture and Stalled Progress in Narrowing the Black-White Test Score Gap
Author: Phillips, Meredith

How Did the Statewide Assessment and Accountability Policies of the 1990s Affect Instructional Quality in Low-Income Elementary Schools?
Author: Phillips, Meredith, Jennifer Flashman

Social Reproduction and Child-rearing Practices:  Social Class, Children’s Agency, and the Summer Activity Gap in Low-Income Elementary Schools
Author: Chin, Tiffani, Meredith Phillips

School Inequality:  What Do We Know?
Author: Phillips, Meredith, Tiffani Chin

The Black-White Test Score Gap
Editor: Jencks, Christopher, Meredith Phillips

SELECTED REPORTS

College Going in LAUSD: An Analysis of College Enrollment, Persistence, and Completion Patterns
Author: Phillips, Meredith, Kyo Yamashiro, Thomas A. Jacobson

College Readiness Supports in LAUSD High Schools: A First Look
Author: Phillips, Meredith, Kyo Yamashiro, Carrie E. Miller

Gary Orfield

Gary Orfield is Distinguished Research Professor of Education, Law, Political Science and Urban Planning at the University of California, Los Angeles. His research interests are in the study of civil rights, education policy, urban policy, and minority opportunity.

He was co-founder and director of the Harvard Civil Rights Project, and now serves as co-director of the Civil Rights Project/Proyecto Derechos Civiles at UCLA.

His central interest has been the development and implementation of social policy, particularly the impact of policy on equal opportunity for success in American society.

Orfield is a member of the National Academy of Education and has received numerous awards, including the Teachers College Medal, Social Justice Award of the AERA, the American Political Science Association Charles Merriam Award for his “contribution to the art of government through the application of social science research,” and honorary PhDs.

Orfield’s research includes 12 co-authored or co-edited books since 2004 and scores of articles and reports. In addition to scholarly work, he has served as expert witness or special master in more than three dozen class action civil rights cases, on school desegregation, housing discrimination and other issues, and as consultant to many school districts, federal, state and local governments, civil rights and teachers organizations. He and various collaborators have organized amicus briefs to the Supreme Court on all the major school and affirmative action decisions over the last two decades.

Forthcoming books:

  • Accountability and Opportunity in Higher Education: The Civil Rights Dimension (with Nicholas Hillman), Harvard Education Press (2018)
  • Discrimination in Elite Public Schools: Investigating Buffalo (with Jennifer Ayscue), Teachers College Press (2018)

Orfield also edited the 2017 Educational Testing Service report, Alternative Paths to Diversity: Exploring and Implementing Effective College Admissions Policies.

“A Life in Civil Rights” appeared in the October 2010 issue of PS: Political Science & Politics.

Other books he co-wrote or co-edited:

  • Educational Delusions? Why Choice can Deepen Inequality and How to Make Schools Fair (with E. Frankenberg), Berkeley: University of California Press (2013)
  • The Resegregation of Suburban Schools: A Hidden Crisis in American Education (with E. Frankenberg), Cambridge: Harvard Education Press (2012)
  • Lessons In Integration: Realizing the Promise of Racial Diversity in America’s Public Schools (with E. Frankenberg), Charlottesville: UVA Press (2008)
  • Twenty-First Century Color Lines (with Andrew Grant-Thomas), Philadelphia: Temple University Press (2009)
  • Expanding Opportunity in Higher Education (with P. Gandara and C. Horn), Albany: SUNY Press (2006)
  • Latino Educational Opportunity: New Directions for Community Colleges, 133 (2) (with C. Horn and S. Flores), San Francisco: Jossey-Bass/Wiley (2006)
  • School Resegregation: Must the South Turn Back?(with John Boger), Chapel Hill: UNC Press (2005)
  • Higher Education and the Color Line (with Patricia Marin and Catherine Horn), Cambridge: Harvard Education Press (2005)
  • Dropouts in America: Confronting the Graduation Rate Crisis, Cambridge: Harvard Education Press (2004)

 

Archie Kleingartner

Dr. Kleingartner is Professor of Policy Studies and Management and the Founding Dean of the UCLA School of Public Policy and Social Research. He has been on the faculty of UCLA since 1964. He chaired the committee that recommended and designed the UCLA School of Public Policy and Social Research and served as Dean during its first two years (1994 -1996). From 1997 – 1999 Dr. Kleingartner served as Chair of the UCLA Academic Information Technology Board (AITB), which set policy in the areas of computing and digital technology.

From 1975 to 1983, Professor Kleingartner served the nine-campus University of California System as Vice President for Academic and Staff Personnel Relations. During that period, he had responsibility for the human resources function for a workforce in excess of 100,000 faculty, management and staff. He was responsible for personnel policies, affirmative action programs, collective bargaining and employee relations, compensations and salary administration, training and development, the UC retirement system, employee benefits, faculty housing, conflict of interest, and information practices.

Professor Kleingartner founded the Human Resources Round Table (HARRT) at UCLA, a membership organization, in 1986. HARRT’s primary objective is to enhance the practice and teaching of management by fostering close ties between academic and human resources executives.

He is the creator and co-executive producer of a major CD-ROM and World Wide Web project entitled Global Windows: The Guide to Business Success — Japan (1997). The site is an authoritative guide for conducting business with the Japanese. A second website, Global Window: The Guide to Business Success – China s in development and scheduled to go online in 2002

Dr. Kleingartner’s publications have dealt with such topics as international human resources management, higher education, employee relations, management of creative professionals, cultural policy, and multimedia education in professional development.

SELECTED BOOKS & PUBLICATIONS

Flexible Production and the Transformation of Industrial Relations in the Motion Picture and Television Industry
Kleingartner, A. and Paul, A.  Industrial and Labor Relations Review 47, no. 4 (1994): 663-678.

Human Resource Management in High Technology
Kleingartner, A. and Anderson, C. Lexington, MA: Lexington Books, 1987.

Human Resource Management in High Technology
Kleingartner, A. and Anderson, C. Lexington, MA: Lexington Books, 1987.

Sarah Reber

Bio

I am an Associate Professor of Public Policy at the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs. I received my Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University in 2003. From 2003 to 2005, I was a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Scholar in Health Policy Research at UC Berkeley.

My research in education focuses on understanding the educational, social, and fiscal effects—both intended and unintended—of some of the most important policies of the 20th century: school desegregation, the Civil Rights Act, and the massive expansion of federal aid to K-12 education that Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act represented. In addition, I am conducting a randomized field experiment of two interventions designed to increase college enrollment among disadvantaged students.

My research in health economics examines the advantages and disadvantages of promoting competition in health insurance markets.

Affiliations

Research Associate, National Bureau of Economic Research
Faculty Affiliate, California Center for Population Research
Faculty Affiliate, California Policy Lab

More information about her research and teaching can be found at sarahreber.com.

 

Charles E. Young

Charles E. Young took office as chancellor of UCLA on Sept. 1, 1968, and was formally inaugurated on May 23, 1969 — the 50th anniversary of the university’s founding. His inaugural pledge was to advance UCLA “from the second level of good universities to the first rank of excellent universities.” Today, UCLA is in the distinguished company of the finest universities in the nation and the world.

When he became chancellor at the age of 36, Dr. Young was the youngest person at the helm of any major American university. After nearly 29 years in office, he was the senior chief executive by tenure among his fellow chancellors and presidents nationwide. Chancellor Young retired on June 30, 1997.

Dr. Young presided over a complex organization that is one of the largest employers in Southern California and had an operating budget approaching $2 billion. He directed the rapid growth of UCLA — which educates more students than any other California college, public or private — toward its present distinction as one of the country’s most comprehensive and dynamic university campuses.

UCLA is widely recognized to be among the top 10 research universities in the nation; established in 1919, it is also the youngest of this select group. Few institutions can match UCLA’s comprehensiveness. In 1995, the National Research Council ranked 31 UCLA Ph.D. programs among the top 20 in their respective fields — third-best in the nation.

In the first months of Dr. Young’s chancellorship, UCLA had only one endowed professorship, library holdings of fewer than three million volumes, an ethnic minority enrollment of less than 23 percent, and an operating budget of $170 million. The campus today boasts more than 120 endowed faculty chairs, 6.7 million volumes in the UCLA Library, an ethnic minority enrollment of nearly 60 percent, and operating expenses approaching $2 billion. Extramural funding for the research program has skyrocketed during Chancellor Young’s tenure, from $66.4 million in 1968-’69 to a campus-record $406 million in 1995-’96. The private fund-raising program has likewise flourished, from $6.1 million raised in 1968-’69 to $190.8 million in 1995-’96 — a University of California record. UCLA’s endowment, which had a market value of $19 million on June 30, 1969, is presently valued at $752 million. By each of these measures, UCLA ranks among America’s premier universities.

Dr. Young’s association with the University of California dates to 1953, when he enrolled as a transfer student at UC Riverside. There, he served as the new campus’s first student body president. After graduating with honors in 1955, he pursued doctoral studies in political science at UCLA, earning his M.A. in 1957 and Ph.D. in 1960. In 1959, as a member of UC President Clark Kerr’s staff, he participated in the creation of the Master Plan for Higher Education in California and the University Growth Plan.

Dr. Young returned to UCLA in 1960 to serve in a series of executive posts in the administration of Chancellor Franklin D. Murphy: assistant to the chancellor (1960-62), assistant chancellor (1962-63), and vice chancellor for administration (1963-68). He also became a full professor in the political science department, an appointment he still holds. Following Chancellor Murphy’s resignation, Dr. Young was named his successor by the UC Regents on July 12, 1968.

Chancellor Young was recognized nationally and internationally for his leadership in higher education. He was chairman of the Association of American Universities. He served on numerous task forces and commissions of the American Council on Education, the National Association of State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges, and the Business-Higher Education Forum.

Committed to making internationalism and inclusiveness hallmarks of UCLA, Chancellor Young was an ardent spokesman on behalf of educational opportunity, inclusiveness and the value of ethnic and cultural diversity to the university experience. He served on the administrative board of the International Association of Universities and the National Committee on United States-China Relations, Inc., and chaired the board of governors of the Maureen and Mike Mansfield Foundation. In 1985, he received the Award for Inter-American University Cooperation from the Inter-American Organization for Higher Education. The chancellor and his wife, Sue K. Young, were jointly awarded the UCLA International Student Center’s 1987 Neil H. Jacoby International Award for their outstanding contributions to international education. In January 1997, the Coalition for International Education honored Dr. Young with its first International Education Leadership Award, in recognition of his contributions to the development of international studies at UCLA and other American universities.

Chancellor Young made UCLA an integral part of, and partner with, the Los Angeles region, reinforcing the importance of the university’s mission in service to the community. His commitment to public service was reflected in his leadership role in California Campus Compact, an organization he co-chaired that is part of a national coalition of colleges and universities striving to encourage student involvement in community and public service. Dr. Young also was active in efforts to improve elementary and secondary education; he serves on the Council of Trustees of LEARN (Los Angeles Educational Alliance for Restructuring Now), a coalition of leaders working to reform K-12 education.

A longtime member of the NCAA Presidents Commission, Chancellor Young often drew the national spotlight as a leading proponent of intercollegiate athletics reform. He was active in the movement to raise academic eligibility standards for student-athletes and curb recruiting abuses.

Chancellor Young is a respected adviser to numerous enterprises in the realms of business, education, the arts, and science and technology. He has served on a number of corporate boards in the finance, technology, and health-care industries and is currently a director of Intel Corp. and Nicholas-Applegate Capital Management. He is a member of the board of directors of the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences Foundation, the Los Angeles World Affairs Council, and Town Hall of California. He participates in several organizations that examine the role of science and technology in society, and the research agenda for universities. These include the Carnegie Commission Task Force on Science and Technology and the States, the National Academy of Sciences’ Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable, and the Board of Governors of the Foundation for International Exchange of Scientific and Cultural Information by Telecommunications.

Chancellor Young has been honored many times for his contributions to academe and community endeavors. He was elected a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1994, cited for his “outstanding and recognized accomplishments in educational and scientific administration.” In May 1996 he was among a select group of leaders in education, community affairs, the arts and culture, and communications recognized by the Central City Association as a “Treasure of Los Angeles.” The Hugh O’Brien Youth Foundation bestowed its prestigious Albert Schweitzer Leadership Award upon him in December 1996.

Dr. Young has received several tributes from the UCLA Alumni Association, including its highest honor, the Edward A. Dickson Alumnus of the Year Award, which was presented in May 1994 in recognition of his 25th anniversary as chancellor. The UC Riverside Alumni Association gave him its 1996 Distinguished Service Award, honoring his contributions to higher education and his tenure as UCLA chancellor. Also in 1996, Chancellor Charles and Sue Young were named Honorary Fellows of UCLA’s College of Letters and Science.

Albert Carnesale

Albert Carnesale is Chancellor Emeritus and Professor at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). He was Chancellor of the University from July 1, 1997 through June 30, 2006, and now serves as Professor of Public Policy and of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. His research and teaching focus on public policy issues having substantial scientific and technological dimensions, and he is the author or co-author of six books and more than 100 articles on a wide range of subjects, including national security strategy, arms control, nuclear proliferation, the effects of technological change on foreign and defense policy, domestic and international energy issues, and higher education.

Carnesale is a member of the Secretary of Energy’s Advisory Board; serves on the National Academies Committee on U.S. Air Force Strategic Deterrence Capabilities; chaired the National Academies Committees on NASA’s Strategic Direction, on America’s Climate Choices, on Nuclear Forensics, and on U.S. Conventional Prompt Global Strike; and was a member of the Obama Administration’s Blue Ribbon Commission on America’s Nuclear Future. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, the Council on Foreign Relations, and the Pacific Council on International Policy; and is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. In addition, he is a member of the Board of Directors of Harvard University’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, and of the Advisory Board of the RAND Corporation’s Center for Global Risk and Security. He serves also on the Boards of Directors of Teradyne and Amicrobe.

Prior to joining UCLA, Carnesale was at Harvard for 23 years, serving as Lucius N. Littauer Professor of Public Policy and Administration, Dean of the John F. Kennedy School of Government, and Provost of the University. He holds a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering (Cooper Union), a master’s degree in mechanical engineering (Drexel University), and a Ph.D. in nuclear engineering (North Carolina State University).

Todd Franke

Trained in social work and educational psychology, Professor Franke seeks to achieve a better understanding of, and improve the responsiveness of service systems in the fields of social services, education and health. Using cognitive theory to better define policy issues related to the integration of these two important fields, Dr. Franke’s research has focused in part on the impact of disability and chronic illness on school-age children. He is currently conducting a study, funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, on the use of personal assistance services for children with disabilities. In addition, Dr. Franke studies how adolescents solve social problems; urban mobility and its impact on children’s education and social development; and how to successfully integrate health and social services in school settings.

Dr. Franke is active in several local and regional efforts to restructure social services in the schools, helping to conceptualize planning and implementation and the design of evaluation measures in Los Angeles Unified School District, the country’s second-largest school district. He also serves as a consultant to local school districts for the preparation of funding proposals for Healthy Start, a state program to establish linkages between community social service agencies and schools. HIs primary work occurs at the intersection of youth violence (child welfare and gang involved youth) and education. In these areas he designs and undertakes evaluative research and has obtained over $9 million in research funding over the past 7 years. He is currently the Associate Director of the UCLA Center for Healthier Children, Families and Communities.

Dr. Franke has been involved with agencies that serve thousands of families representing unique geographic and cultural communities in California, particularly southern California counties. He recently prepared a report for the Los Angeles City Council which examines the measurement issues involved in assessing the success of gang-related and youth development prevention and intervention programs in the city. The link between involvement in the child welfare system and gang involvement is well documented. Dr. Franke is currently the Co-PI of the Best Start LA Initiative which aims to shape, strengthen and support five Los Angeles communities by building resources and providing access to activities that improve the well-being, development and care experienced by pregnant women, parents of newborns and children age 3 and under.

Dr. Franke was also the Principal Investigator for the First 5 LA-funded Partnership for Families Initiative, which is a secondary prevention initiative that is designed to prevent child maltreatment in vulnerable families. Dr. Franke has been the PI for the Small County Initiative, which was designed to systematically examine California’s efforts to build and enhance child abuse and neglect prevention efforts in 11 rural counties in northern California. Additionally, he has numerous years of experience in conducting cross-sectional and longitudinal research in the fields of education, child welfare and adolescent violence.