Jody Heymann

Dr. Heymann established and will continue to lead the first global initiative to examine health and social policy in all 193 UN nations. This initiative provides an in-depth look at how health and social policies affect the ability of individuals, families and communities to meet their health needs across the economic and social spectrum worldwide. In addition to carrying out award-winning global social policy research, Heymann carried out some of the original studies on the risk of HIV transmission via breast milk to infants in Africa, the impact of HIV/AIDS on tuberculosis rates in Africa, and how labor conditions impact the health and welfare of families globally.

She has authored and edited more than 200 publications, including 15 books. These include Changing Children’s Chances(Harvard University Press, 2013), Making Equal Rights Real (Cambridge University Press, 2012), Lessons in Educational Equality (Oxford University Press, 2012), Protecting Childhood in the AIDS Pandemic (Oxford University Press, 2012), Profit at the Bottom of the Ladder (Harvard Business Press, 2010), Raising the Global Floor (Stanford University Press, 2009),Trade and Health (McGill Queens University Press, 2007), Forgotten Families (Oxford University Press, 2006), Healthier Societies (Oxford University Press, 2006), Unfinished Work (New Press, 2005), Global Inequalities at Work (Oxford University Press, 2003), and The Widening Gap (Basic Books, 2000).

Deeply committed to translating research into policies and programs that improve individual and population health, Dr. Heymann has worked with government leaders in North America, Europe, Africa and Latin America as well as a wide range of intergovernmental organizations including the World Health Organization, the International Labor Organization, the World Economic Forum, UNICEF and UNESCO. Central to her efforts is bridging the gap between research and policymakers. She has helped develop legislation with the U.S. Congress as well as with UN agencies based on the implications of her team’s research results. Dr. Heymann’s findings have been featured on CNN Headline News; MSNBC; Good Morning America; Fox News; National Public Radio’s “All Things Considered,” “Fresh Air” and “Marketplace;” in The New York TimesWashington Post; Los Angeles Times; Business Week; Inc; Portfolio; Forbes India and USA Today, among other internationally and nationally syndicated programs and press.

Michael A. Stoll

Michael A. Stoll is Professor of Public Policy in the Luskin School of Public Affairs at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). He serves as a Fellow at the American Institutes for Research, the Brookings Institution, the Institute for Research on Poverty at University of Wisconsin, Madison, and the National Poverty Center at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and served as a past Visiting Scholar at the Russell Sage Foundation.

Dr. Stoll’s published work explores questions of poverty, labor markets, migration, and crime. His past work includes an examination of the labor market difficulties of less-skilled workers, in particular the role that racial residential segregation, job location patterns, job skill demands, employer discrimination, job competition, transportation, job information and criminal records play in limiting employment opportunities.

His recent work examines the labor market consequences of mass incarceration and the benefits and costs of the prison boom. A recently completed book, Why Are so Many Americans in Prison, explores the causes of the American prison boom and what to do about it to insure both low crime and incarceration rates.

Much of his work has been featured in a variety of media outlets including NPR, PBS, the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, The Economist, Chicago Tribune, San Francisco Chronicle, and Washington Post, ABC, NBC, CBS, Univision, among other outlets.  He also regularly advises the U.S. Departments of Health and Human Services and Labor, as well as for state and local governments in various capacities.

Prof. Stoll received his Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and a B.S. from the University of California, Berkeley.

RECENT BOOKS

 

SELECTED BOOKS & PUBLICATIONS

Why are So Many Americans in Prison? jointly authored with Steven Raphael, New York, NY: Russell Sage Foundation, 2013.

Do Prisons Make Us Safer? The Benefits and Costs of the Prison Boom
edited with Steven Raphael, New York, NY: Russell Sage Foundation, 2009

Barriers to Reentry? The Labor Market for Released Prisoners in Post-Industrial America edited with David Weiman and Shawn Bushway, New York, NY: Russell Sage Foundation, 2007 (Selected as a Noteworthy Book in Industrial Relations by Princeton University’s Industrial Relations Section.)

Wes Yin

Wes Yin is an associate professor in the Department of Public Policy and the Anderson School of Management at UCLA, and is a Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research. Prior to coming to UCLA, Yin served as Acting Assistant Secretary of Economic Policy at the Department of Treasury, and as a Senior Economist in the White House Council of Economic Advisers. He also taught at Boston University and the University of Chicago, and was a Robert Wood Johnson Scholar in Health Policy at Harvard University.

Yin’s research interests are in the areas of health, economic development, consumer and public finance. His current research studies the relationship between economic growth and the formation of private markets; and how information, income, and competitive forces impact the delivery of health care in developed and developing countries.

 

PUBLISHED AND FORTHCOMING ECONOMICS PAPERS

Insurers’ Negotiating Leverage and the External Effect of Medicare Part D (with Darius Lakdawalla), Review of Economics and Statistics,  97:2 p.314-331 May 2015 (an earlier version appears as NBER working paper no. 16251)

R&D Policy, Agency Costs and Innovation in Personalized Medicine, Journal of Health Economics, September 2009, 28(5), pp. 950-962

Market Incentives and Pharmaceutical Innovation, Journal of Health Economics, July 2008, 27(4), pp. 1060-1077

Female Empowerment: Impact of a Commitment Savings Product in the Philippines (with Nava Ashraf and Dean Karlan) World Development, 2010, 38(3), pages 333-344

Tying Odysseus to the Mast: Evidence from a Commitment Savings Product in the Philippines (with Nava Ashraf and Dean Karlan) Quarterly Journal of Economics, May 2006, 121(2). Winner of TIAA-CREF 2006 Certificate of Excellence

Designing Targeting Schemes with Poverty Maps: Does Disaggregation Help? (with Berk Özler, Chris Elbers, Tomoki Fujii, Peter Lanjouw), Journal of Development Economics, May 2007, 83(1)

Deposit Collectors (with Nava Ashraf and Dean Karlan), Advances in Economic Analysis & Policy, March 2006, 6(2), Article 5

 

WORKING PAPERS

The Market for High-Quality Medicine: Retail Chain Entry and Drug Quality in India (with Daniel Bennett) [Appendix]

Information Barriers in Health Care Decision-Making: Experimental Evidence from the California Health Benefits Exchange (with Richard Domurat and Isaac Menashe)

 

PUBLISHED POLICY AND MEDICAL JOURNAL ARTICLES

Strengthening Risk Protection through Private Long-Term Care Insurance. Hamilton Project, Discussion Paper 2015-06, June 2015

Value of Survival Gains in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (with John Penrod, J. Ross Maclean, Darius Lakdawalla and Tomas Philipson) American Journal of Managed Care 2012 Nov;18(11 Suppl):S257-64

The impact of Medicare Part D on Medicare-Medicaid Dual-eligible Beneficiaries’ Prescription Utilization and Expenditures (with Caleb Alexander and Anirban Basu), Health Services Research, February 2010, 45(1), pp. 133-151   

Valuing health technologies at NICE: Recommendations for Improved Incorporation of Treatment Value in HTA (with Dana Goldman, Darius Lakdawalla and Tomas Philipson) Health Economics October 2010, 10(11) pp. 1109-1116

The Effect of the Medicare Part D Prescription Benefit on Drug Utilization and Expenditures (with Anirban Basu, James Zhang, Atonu Rabbani, David Meltzer, Caleb Alexander) Annals of Internal Medicine, Lead article, February 2008, 148:3 pp. 169-177

Solutions and Challenges to Curing Global Health Inequality Innovations 2(4), October 2007, 2(4), pp. 72-80

Impact of the Medicare Part D prescription benefit on use of generic drugs and different therapeutic drug classes (with James Zhang and Caleb Alexander) The Journal of General Internal Medicine, October 2008, 23:10 pp. 1673-1678

Testing Savings Product Innovations Using an Experimental Methodology (with Nava Ashraf and Dean Karlan), Asian Development Bank, Economics and Research Department Technical Paper No. 8. November, 2003

A Review of Commitment Savings Products in Developing Countries (with Nava Ashraf, Nathalie Gons and Dean Karlan), Asian Development Bank, Economics and Research Department Working Paper No. 45 June, 2003

 

CURRENT TEACHING

Econometrics (MPP Core) (PP208)

Health Care Finance and Management (MBA and MPP elective) (MGMT298 & PP290)

 

FILE DOWNLOADS

 

 

Michael Lens

A large and growing body of research shows that neighborhoods matter for several life outcomes including economic mobility, education, and safety. For many reasons, positive neighborhood attributes remain unattainable for low-income households in many U.S. metropolitan areas. Professor Lens’ work fulfills gaps in the literature that evaluates the potential for housing policy to reduce this separation by focusing on neighborhood safety and access to jobs. This research contributes to this literature in both conceptual and empirical ways. Specifically, this research 1) measures the neighborhood conditions of families that receive housing subsidies; 2) analyzes the potential interactions of crime with subsidized housing and commercial development; 3) identifies how residential location affects employment outcomes; and 4) improves how scholars and policy makers measure neighborhood opportunity for low-income households.

In recent research, Professor Lens is studying the effect of the housing bust on housing subsidy demand and local government finances, the role of public investments in gentrification processes, and the spatial concentration of eviction. Professor Lens’ research has won awards from the Journal of the American Planning Association and Housing Policy Debate.

Among several grants, Professor Lens has – along with fellow UCLA Urban Planning Professor Paavo Monkkonen – a multiyear grant from the MacArthur Foundation to study the effect of the housing boom and bust on local government finances.

Professor Lens teaches courses on Quantitative Analysis, Community-Based Research, Housing Markets and Policy, Poverty and Inequality, and Research Methods.

Click here to view available office hours.

SELECTED BOOKS & PUBLICATIONS

Job Accessibility Among Housing Subsidy Recipients
Housing Policy Debate 24(4): 671-691.
Best Paper of 2013-14, Housing Policy Debate
Download file

The Impact of Housing Vouchers on Crime in U.S. Cities and Suburbs
Urban Studies 51(6): 1274-1289.
Author: Lens, M.C.
Download file 

The Limits of Housing Investment as a Revitalization Tool: Crime in New York City
Journal of the American Planning Association 79(3): 211-221.
Author: Lens, M.C.
Best Article of 2014, Journal of the American Planning Association
Download file

Safe, but Could Be Safer: Why Do Voucher Households Live in Higher Crime Neighborhoods?
Cityscape 15(3): 131-152.
Author: Lens, M.C.
Download file

Subsidized Housing and Crime: Theory, Mechanisms, and Evidence
Journal of Planning Literature 28(4): 352-363.
Author: Lens, M.C.
Download file

American Murder Mystery Revisited: Do Housing Voucher Households Cause Crime?
Housing Policy Debate, 22(4): 551-572.
Download file

Do Vouchers Help Low-Income Households Live in Safer Neighborhoods? Evidence on the Housing Choice Voucher Program
2011, Cityscape, 13(3): 135-159.
Download file

Other Links:

How Zoning Restrictions Make Segregation Worse
Memphis Murder Revisited: Do Housing Voucher Households Cause Crime?
Gang Injunction Draws Suspicion In Hidden Valley
Moving Poor People Into a Neighborhood Doesn’t Cause Crime

 

Refereed Journal Articles

Lens, Michael C., and Vincent Reina. “The Impact of Housing Subsidy Expirations on Neighborhood Opportunity.” Housing Policy Debate. Forthcoming.

Lens, Michael C., and C.J. Gabbe. “Employment Proximity and Outcomes for Moving to Opportunity Families.” Journal of Urban Affairs. Forthcoming.

Lens, Michael C., and Rachel Meltzer. “Is Crime Bad for Business? New York City Neighborhoods 2004 to 2010.” Journal of Regional Science, Forthcoming 

Lens, Michael C. “Measuring the Geography of Opportunity.” Progress in Human Geography, Forthcoming 

Lens, Michael C., and Paavo Monkkonen. 2016. “Housing Market Regulation and Economic Segregation.”Journal of the American Planning Association, 82(1): 6-21.

Lens, Michael C. 2014. “Job Accessibility Among Housing Subsidy Recipients.” Housing Policy Debate24(4): 671-691. Best Paper of 2013-14, Housing Policy Debate.

Lens, Michael C. 2014. “The Impact of Housing Vouchers on Crime in U.S. Cities and Suburbs.” Urban Studies 51(6): 1274-1289.

Lens, Michael C. 2013. “The Limits of Housing Investment as a Revitalization Tool: Crime in New York City.” Journal of the American Planning Association 79(3): 211-221. Best Paper of Volume 79, Journal of the American Planning Association.

Lens, Michael C. 2013. “Safe, but Could Be Safer: Why Do Voucher Households Live in Higher Crime Neighborhoods?” Cityscape 15(3): 131-152.

Lens, Michael C. 2013. “Subsidized Housing and Crime: Theory, Mechanisms, and Evidence.” Journal of Planning Literature 28(4): 352-363.

Ellen, Ingrid Gould, Michael C. Lens, and Katherine M. O’Regan. 2012.  “American Murder Mystery Revisited: Do Housing Voucher Households Cause Crime?” Housing Policy Debate, 22(4): 551-572.

Lens, Michael C., Ingrid Gould Ellen, and Katherine M. O’Regan. 2011. “Do Vouchers Help Low-Income Households Live in Safer Neighborhoods? Evidence on the Housing Choice Voucher Program.” Cityscape, 13(3): 135-159.

 

Papers in Progress

Sugie, Naomi and Michael C. Lens. “Spatial Job Search, Residential Job Accessibility, and Employment Outcomes for Returning Parolees.” Revise and resubmit (Demography)

Lens, Michael C. “Housing Subsidy Demand During The Great Recession.” Revise and resubmit (Urban Studies)

 

Randall Akee

Randall Akee is an Associate Professor at the University of California, Los Angeles in the Department of Public Policy and American Indian Studies. He is currently on leave as a David M. Rubenstein Fellow in Economic Studies at the Brookings Institution in Washington, DC. He completed his Ph.D. at Harvard University in June 2006. Prior to his doctoral studies, Dr. Akee earned a Master’s degree in International and Development Economics at Yale University. He also spent several years working for the State of Hawaii Office of Hawaiian Affairs Economic Development Division.

Dr. Akee is a faculty research fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) in Labor Studies and the Children’s Groups. He is also a research fellow at the Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development and at the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), a faculty affiliate at the UCLA California Center for Population Research (CCPR) at UCLA and a faculty affiliate at UC Berkelely Center for Effective Global Action (CEGA). His main research interests are Labor Economics, Economic Development and Migration.

Previous research has focused on the determinants of migration and human trafficking, the effect of changes in household income on educational attainment, the effect of political institutions on economic development and the role of property institutions on investment decisions. Current research focuses on income inequality and immobility by race and ethnicity in the US. Dr. Akee has worked on several American Indian reservations, Canadian First Nations, and Pacific Island nations in addition to working in various Native Hawaiian communities.

From August 2006 until August 2009 he was a Research Associate at IZA, where he also served as Deputy Program Director for Employment and Development. Prior to UCLA (2009-2012), he was an Assistant Professor at Tufts University and spent AY 2011-2012 at the Center for Labor Economics at University of California, Berkeley.

In June 2013 he was named to the U.S. Census Bureau’s National Advisory Committee on Racial, Ethnic and Other Populations.

Google Scholar Citations

 

Published and Forthcoming Papers:

Estimating Institutionalization and Homelessness for Status First Nations in Canada: A Method and Implications,” forthcoming in International Indigenous Policy Journal. (with Donna Feir)

“Socioeconomic Outcomes for Indigenous Students attending a High Performing School” forthcoming at Journal of American Indian Education.

How Does Household Income Affect Child Personality Traits and Behaviors?” (with E. Simeonova, J. Costello, and B. Copeland) American Economic Review, 108(3), 775-827.

“The Role of Race, Ethnicity and Tribal Enrollment on Asset Accumulation: An Examination of American Indian Tribal Nations”. (with Sue K. Stockly, William Darity Jr, Darrick Hamilton, and Paul Ong), forthcoming in Ethnic and Racial Studies.

“Critical Junctures and Economic Development —  Evidence from the Adoption of Constitutions Among American Indian Nations.” (with Miriam Jorgensen and Uwe Sunde), Journal of Comparative Economics, 2015, Volume 43, pp. 844-861.

“The Indian Gaming Regulatory Act and Its Effects on American Indian Economic Development” (with Katherine Spilde and Jonathan Taylor) Journal of Economic Perspectives, Summer 2015, Volume 29, No. 3, pp. 185-208.
Press: American Economics Association

“Social and Economic Changes on American Indian Reservations in California: an Examination of Twenty Years of Tribal Government Gaming” (with Katherine Spilde and Jonathan Taylor) UNLV Gaming Research & Review Journal, 2014, Volume 18, No. 2.

Investigating the Effects of Furloughing Public School Teachers on Juvenile Crime in Hawaii” (with T. Halliday and S. Kwak), Economics of Education Review, Volume 42, 2014, pp. 1-11.
Press: KITV NewsHawaii News NowHonolulu Star AdvertiserWest Hawaii Today

“Property Institutions and Business Investment on American Indian Reservations” (with M. Jorgensen), Regional Science and Urban Economics, Volume 46, 2014, pp. 116-125.

“Transnational Tracking, Law Enforcement and Victim Protection: A Middleman Tracker’s Perspective” (with A. Basu, A. Bedi and N. Chau), Journal of Law and Economics, May 2014, v. 57, pp. 349-386.

“Young Adult Obesity and Household Income: Effects of Unconditional Cash Transfers.” (with Emilia Simeonova, J. Costello, W. Copeland, and A. Angold), American Economics Journal: Applied Economics, 2013, 5(2):1-28.
Press: New York Times
Blog Posts: Daily KosThe EconomistThe Washington Post

“The Persistence of Self-Employment Across Borders: New Evidence on Legal Immigrants to the United States”,  (with David A Jaeger and Konstantinos Tatsiramos) Economics Bulletin, Vol. 33 No. 1 pp. 126-137, 2013.

“Skin Tone’s Decreasing Importance on Employment: Evidence from a Longitudinal Dataset, 1985-2000.” (with Mutlu Yuksel) Industrial and Labor Relations Review, V. 62, No. 2, 2012.

“Errors in Self-Reported Wages: The Role of Previous Earnings Volatility and Individual Characteristics.” Journal of Development Economics, V. 96, No. 2, Nov. 2011, pp. 409-421.

“‘Counting Experience’ Among the Least Counted: The Role of Cultural and Community Engagement on Educational Outcomes for American Indian, Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian Students.” (with Tarajean Yazzie-Mintz), American Indian Culture and Research Journal, V. 35 Num. 3,  pp. 119-150, 2011.

“Parents’ Incomes and Children’s Outcomes: A Quasi-Experiment with Casinos on American Indian Reservations,” (with J. Costello, W. Copeland, G. Keeler and A. Angold), American Economics Journal: Applied Economics, Volume 2, No. 1, January 2010, pp. 86-115.

 

Working Papers:

“Land Titles and Dispossession: Allotment on American Indian Reservations,”

“First People Lost: Determining the State of Status First Nations Mortality in Canada using Administrative Data,” (with D. Feir) revise and resubmit at Canadian Journal of Economics.

“Racial and Ethnic Income Inequality and Mobility from 2000 to 2014: Evidence from Matched IRS-Census Bureau Data.” (with M. Jones and S. Porter), revise and resubmit at Demography.

“Family Income and the Intergenerational Transmission of Voting Behavior: Evidence from an Income Intervention,” (with E. Simeonova, J. Holbein, E. Costello and W. Copeland)

Reservation Nonemployer and Employer Establishments: Data from U.S. Census Longitudinal Business Databases,” (with Elton Mykerezi and Richard Todd)

 

Research Reports and Books:

“Access to Capital and Credit in Native Communities: A Data Review,” Native Nations Institute Report, with Miriam Jorgensen.

“American Indians on Reservations: A Databook of Socioeconomic Change from 1990 to 2010,” 2014, with Jonathan Taylor.

Research Report for the Ministry of Overseas Indian Affairs. “Migrant Households In India: A Comparison Of The Average Migrant Household And Migrant Households With Non-Resident Accounts In Kerala, Gujarat, Maharashtra And Punjab.” A Joint Report of Center for Advanced Study of India, University of Pennsylvania, 2012, with Devesh Kapur.

Research in Labor Economics.  “Child Labor and the Transition between School and Work”  2010. Vol. 31, edited with Eric Edmonds and Konstantinos Tatsiramos, Emerald Publishing.

Institute for the Study of Labor Prize Book.  “Wages, School Quality and Employment Demand David Card and Alan Krueger” 2011. edited with Klaus Zimmermann, Oxford University Press.

Popular Press:

“Credit Scores & Indians: Recent Evidence on the Prevalence of Low Scores & Borrowing”

Indian Country Today Media Network, April 10, 2016

“The Good(?) and Bad of Boarding Schools”

Indian Country Today Media Network, March 3, 2016.

“Manufacturing Consent for the Living AND the Dead in Hawai’i” with

Noelani Arista. Indian Country Today Media Network, November 20, 2015.

 

Randall Crane

Randall Crane studies the housing, transportation, and economic development challenges of cities, such as rushed urbanization, urban design/behavior linkages, urban environmental problems, public finances, housing and transportation demographics, and the measure, meaning and governance of sprawl. This work is international, with field experience in China, Colombia, Guyana, Indonesia, Kenya, the Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam, and Yemen, and a Fulbright professorship at the Colegio de México in Mexico City.

His areas of interest are Asia, climate change, community development, economic development, environment, gender issues, housing, international and comparative planning, labor and employment, Latin America, poverty, race and ethnicity, transportation, and urban redevelopment. His current research projects are: (1) the design of municipal taxes, fees, and prices; (2) person-versus place-based economic and community development; (3) Chinese urbanization; (4) the demographics of travel, 1985-2013; and (5) understanding smart growth.

Current Research Projects

The design of municipal taxes, fees and prices. Picking up where I left off in a series of papers in the 1990s on the determinants of the efficient and equitable mix of impact fees, property taxes, and other revenue instruments in theory and practice.

Person-versus place-based economic and community development (with Michael Manville). When are urban development strategies best addressed at geography, and when best aimed at individuals regardless of where they live and work?

Chinese urbanization. A substantial share of the world’s urbanization over the next few decades will be concentrated in China. I am particularly interested in the evolution of public/private governance of land development and the joint issues of suburbanization and CBD development/redevelopment, which come together in increasingly common greenfield CBD construction at the city edge.

The demographics of travel, 1985-present. How do race, age, sex and other social and economic circumstances (such as household formation) influence both the demand for and supply of travel by place, means and purpose? That is, what are the substantive linkages between labor and housing markets over space?

The demographics of US housing, 1985-2013. How have the specific patterns of housing use and conditions changed in US cities over the past two decades, across a broad spectrum of individual and community characteristics? Why?

Understanding smart growth (with Daniel Chatman). What is different, better and worse about so-called smart growth urban development strategies as efforts to address the problems of modern urbanization?  This includes a current project for the state agency responsible for implementing California’s primary climate change legislation, focused on the lessons of various land use strategies (“Analyzing the economic benefits and costs of smart growth,” CARB, 2011-2014).

 

Chaired PhD Committees

Charisma Shonté Acey, PhD (2009) “Exit, voice, loyalty and structural silence: Citizen-consumer access and behavior in Nigeria’s urban water markets,” Professor UC Berkeley

Daniel Chatman, PhD (2005) “How the built environment influences non-work travel: Theoretical and empirical essays,” Professor UC Berkeley

Richard Crepeau, PhD (1995) “Mobility and the metropolis:  Issues of travel and land use in urban America,” Professor Appalachian State University

Lynne Cripe, PhD (1997) “Predictors of community participation in sanitation facility improvement:  Attitudes among female peri-urban residents of Quezon City,” Director The Konterra Group

Thomas H. Culhane, PhD (2010) “Getting into hot water:  Problematizing hot water service demand, The case of old Cairo,” Professor University of South Florida

Priyam Das, PhD (2009) “Promise or compromise?  Community managed water supply for the urban poor in Madhya Pradesh, India,” Professor University of Hawai’i at Mānoa

D. Gregg Doyle, PhD (2003) “‘Only a nobody walks’: The decline of pedestrian trips in the United States,” Consultant

Charles J. Gabbe, PhD (2016) “Do land use regulations matter? Why and how?” Professor Santa Clara University

Michael Heimert, PhD (1988) “Contractual alternatives for durable goods requiring maintenance,” Managing Director and Global Leader, Duff & Phelps, LLC

David Mason, PhD (2011) “Cooperation as collateral? : social capital and joint liability : microfinance group lending in Nicaragua,” The World Bank

Jan Mazurek, PhD (2008) “The politics of counting carbon:  Lessons from the California Climate Action Registry,” Director, ClimateWorks Foundation

Gregory Pierce, PhD (2015) “Basic services, low-income settlements and the local state: How collectively-organized initiatives redress inequalities,” Senior Researcher & Adjunct Professor UCLA

Oscar Alberto Pombo López, PhD (1997) Water, sanitation, and poverty in the Mexican borderlands:  Considerations of water sanitation strategies used by the poor in Tijuana,” Professor El Colegió de la Frontera Norte, Mexico

Lisa Schweitzer, PhD (2004) “Environmental sacrifice zones: Risk and transport in Southern California,” Professor University of Southern California

Hyun-Gun Sung, PhD (2005) “Transit friendly Areas: The role of residential relocation and housing development in rail ridership over time,” Professor Chungbuk National University, Korea

Beth Tamayose, PhD (2011) “Rise of western land and water regulation on the Hawaiian Islands:  An historical analysis of land, property, and water governance, 1840s-1910s,” Consultant

 

Recent and Upcoming Presentations

“Equity and Inclusiveness as Building Blocks for Local Government Planning,” invited, Asian Development Bank Conference, Seoul, Korea, December 2017

”On Planning Smart: Practice, Research and Education,” invited, 10th Year Celebration of the DUPM, Renmin University, Beijing, PRC, September 2017

”UN Sustainable Development Goal 11: Sustainable Cities & Communities,” invited, Sustainability Goals Series, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, May 2017

“Lectures on Urbanization and Development,” invited, University of Sichuan, Chengdu, PRC, July 2015

“Private solutions to basic urban service gaps in Africa,” invited, World Resources Institute, Washington DC, May 2015″

Comparing urban problems and policies in the US and the PRC,” invited, University of Sichuan, Chengdu, PRC, July 2014

Efficient Public Finance in Diverse Cities: Modelling the Choices Amongst Taxes in an Open Economy,” Applied Urban Modelling Conference: Planning Urban Infrastructure, Martin Centre for Architectural and Urban Studies, Cambridge University, April 2014

New Developments in the Economic Modelling of Urban Design,” Applied Urban Modelling Conference: Productive, liveable and sustainable city regions, Centre for Research in the Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities, Cambridge University, June 2013

“Debating the Merits of Planning Research: The Importance of My Asking Questions You Think We Already Have Good Enough Answers To,” annual conference, Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning, Cincinnati, November 2012.

The New Smart Growth: Practice, Education & Research,” Keynote speech, China Urban Planning Education Network Congress, Wuhan University, Wuhan, PRC, September 2012

“Public Private Partnerships in Urban Development: The Case of New Downtowns in China,” Keynote speech, Peking University/Lincoln Institute of Land Policy, Beijing, PRC July 2012

“Competitive Cities & Municipalities,” Mayors’ Forum, Philippine Local Government Academy, Manila, Philippines, January 2012

“The Effect of the New Normal on Local Government Finance,” Growth and Infrastructure Consortium Conference, San Diego, October 2011.

“Private/Public Strategies for the New Chinese Downtowns,” 3rd International Conference on Public Policy and Management, Tsinghua University, Beijing, October 2011.

“Water in Megacities: Solutions,” 2011 Global Economic Symposium, Kiel, Germany, October 2011.

“Commuting in Beijing,” International Association for China Planning Conference, Beijing, June 2011.

“Race, Gender and Sprawl: New Results,” Graduate School of Design, Harvard, April 2011.

The Right to the Suburb?” Graduate School of Design, Harvard University, April 2011.

“Global Challenges and Emerging Opportunities Facing Today’s Cities,” Philippine Urban Consortium, Manila, March 2011.

The Evolution of Public/Private Development: What Works, What Fails, and Why?,” University of Alberta, Edmonton, January 2011.

“Housing and the Built Environment: Shooting at Moving Targets,” Housing and Urbanization: What Housing Scholars Think about the Present and Future of the Field, Harvard Graduate School of Design, Cambridge, December 2010

“Trends in US Housing Consumption: 1985-2007,” annual conference, Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning, Minneapolis, October 2010.

“Downtown Inc. in the New China,” Megacities: Problematizing the Urban, conference of the New Encyclopedia Project, UC Irvine, June 2010.

“Cities and Global Sustainability,” Stumbling Toward Sustainability Lecture Series, Aquarium of the Pacific, Long Beach, May 2010

“Travel Behavior and the Scope for Smart Mobility Policies” Symposium on Smart Mobility, Florida State University, April 2010

“Pricing and Social Equity Challenges in Water,” Pricing and Social Equity: An Unplugged Conversation with the Experts, Keston Institute for Public Finance and Infrastructure Policy, USC, April 2010.

“Advanced Transportation Planning” workshop, 102nd National Planning Conference, APA, New Orleans, April 2010

“Getting, Doing and Debating Freakonomics,” Junior State of America, Pacifica High School, April 2010.

“Global Issues in Transportation Policy,” at The Rosenfield Forum, “Changing Lanes: Bold Ideas to Solve L.A.’s Traffic Problems,” Japanese American National Museum, Los Angeles, March 2010.

“Sources of the Narrowing and Widening of Travel Differences by Gender” TRB 4th International Conference on Women’s Issues in Transportation, Beckman Center, Irvine, October 2009

“Sex Changes Everything: The Recent Narrowing and Widening of Travel Differences by Gender” 50th Anniversary ACSP Conference, Washington, DC, October 2009

“New Downtowns in New China: Renewal, Replacement, or Relocation?” Urban Regeneration Roundtable, China Planning Network Conference, Renmin University, Beijing, June 2009

“Public Policy in Urban Planning,” Urban Planning and Public Policy Roundtable, China Planning Network Conference, Renmin University, Beijing, June 2009

“Does Gender Matter? Changes, Choices and Consequences for Transportation Policy,” Netconference 2009, National Center for Transit Research’s National TDM and Telework Clearinghouse at the University of South Florida, May 2009

“Sex Changes Everything: Trends in the Demographics of the U.S. Commute,” Visiting Scholars Seminar, University Transportation Research Center, The City College of New York, May 2009

“Place-Based versus People-Based Community Economic Development,” Lincoln Lecture Series, Lincoln Institute of Land Policy, Cambridge, Massachusetts, April 2009

“Land Planning for Local Public Finance in China,” Center for Urban Development and Land Policy, Peking University/Lincoln Institute, Beijing, April 2009

“Sex Changes Everything: Trends in the Demographics of the U.S. Commute,” National Center for Smart Growth, University of Maryland College Park, April 2009

“Gender Differences: Travel Trends and Research Issues,” Transportation Research Board Annual Meeting, Washington, DC, January 2009

“Reforming the Public Finance of Land in China,” for the symposium “China’s Three Decades of Urban Planning through an International Perspective,” Urban Planning Society of China, Xiamen, November 2008

Blog Reporter for Re-Imagining Cities: Urban Design After the Age of Oil, University of Pennsylvania, November 2008

“Does Gender Matter? Changes, Choices, and Consequences for Transportation Policy,” TRB Impact of Changing Demographics on the Transportation System Conference, Washington, DC, October 2008

“Urban Regeneration in the New China,” Financial Times Urban Regeneration Summit 2008, Shanghai, PRC, September 2008

“Economic Development and Transportation Access in China,” Chengdu Post-Earthquake Reconstruction Symposium, Chengdu, PRC, July 2008

“The New Fiscalization of Land Use in Chinese Cities,” CPN China Urban Housing Congress, Beijing, July 2008

“Urban Design and Transportation Policy,” Peking University—Lincoln Institute Center for Urban Development and Land Policy, Beijing, July 2008

Roundtables on “Place/People Development Planning” and “The Oxford Handbook of Urban Planning,” and paper on “U.S. Housing Trends, 1985-2005,” ACSP/AESOP Fourth Joint Conference, Chicago, July 2008

“Urban Growth with Chinese Characteristics,” Sino-US Workshop on the Environment and Sustainable Development in China, Natural Resources Defense Council and Global Environmental Institute, Party School of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of China, Beijing, PRC, May 2008

“Smart Growth with Chinese Characteristics,” Workshop on Sustainable Urban Planning for Medium and Small Chinese Cities, Center for Agenda 21 (Ministry of Science and Technology) and Natural Resources Defense Council, Tongling City, PRC, May 2008

“Comments on Revenues in Chinese Urban Public Finance,” Local Public Finance and Property Taxation in China, Lincoln Institute of Land Policy, Cambridge, Massachusetts, May 2008

Mobility and Congestion,” 100th National Planning Conference, APA, Las Vegas, April 2008

Sex and Travel in the USA, 1985-2005,” Annual Meeting of the Association of American Geographers, Boston, April 2008

Smart Growth with Chinese Characteristics: Transportation/Land Use Integration in Urban China,” Harvard China Project, Harvard University, March 2008

Sex, Race and Traffic: What is Changing and Why,” Distinguished Speaker Series, MIT Center for Transportation & Logistics, March 2008

“How Urban Form Affects Travel, Public Health, and Climate Change,” MIT Urban Studies & Planning, March 2008

“Public/Private People/Place Development Strategies,” Harvard Graduate School of Design, March 2008

“Challenges for Smart Growth in China (and the U.S.),” presentation to visiting delegation from the Chinese Academy of Urban Planning & Design, PRC, January 2008

“Sex and Traffic, Etc.,” Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service, NYU, December 2007

Downtown Development in Los Angeles: Planning Obstacles & Opportunities,” Annual UCLA Real Estate Conference, Ziman Center for Real Estate, Skirball Center, Los Angeles, November 2007

“Sex and Commuting, 1985-2005,” Department of Policy, Planning & Design, UC Irvine, October 2007

People-Based Versus Place-Based Economic Development Strategies: A Reconciliation,” ACSP Conference, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, October 2007. (with M. Manville)

“Challenges to Land Use/Transportation Integration in Modern Urban China,” Institute of Transportation Studies/Enjoyor, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, PRC, October 2007

“Smart Growth with Chinese Characteristics,” Third International Symposium on Urban Development and Land Policy in China, Lincoln Institute of Land Policy, Hangzhou, PRC, October 2007

Top 5 Challenges to Integrating Transportation with Land Use in Urban China,” 1st Urban Transportation Conference, China Planning Network, Beijing, August 2007.

Urban Sprawl and the Built Environment,” Invited lecture, Beijing Municipal Institute of City Planning and Design, Beijing, August 2007.

Suburbanization, Sprawl, and the New Mobility,” Seventh International Symposium on Asia Pacific Architecture, School of Architecture, University of Hawai’i at Mānoa, June 2007.

Planeación Urbana y Políticas de Suelo: Puntos de Debate,” Seminario Internacional 10 Años de la Ley 388 de 1997: Sus Aportes al Ordinamiento Urbano y a la Consolidatión de Políticas de Suelo, National Capitol Building, Bogotá, Colombia, May 2007.

Housing and Poverty in the U.S.: New Evidence on What, Who and Why,” Institute of Urban and Regional Development, UC Berkeley, April 2007.

U.S. Housing Affordability and Crowding Trends, 1985-2005,” Annual Meeting of the Association of American Geographers, San Francisco, April 2007.

Is the Gender Gap History?,” University of California Thirteenth Annual Transportation Research Conference, UCLA, February 2007.

Sex, Lies, and Commuting in the US: 1985-2005,” University of Toronto, February 2007.

“New Research on the Journey to Work,” Department of Urban & Regional Planning, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, January 2007.

“Sex, Lies, and the Built Environment,” Department of City & Regional Planning, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, January 2007.

“Growth, Growth Impacts, and Planning for Growth,” Aquarium of the Pacific, Long Beach, December 2006.

“Integrating Land Use and Transportation Planning,” presentation to the Director of the Beijing Municipal Planning Bureau, November 2006.

“Public Economics for Planners,” ACSP Conference, Ft. Worth, Texas, November 2006.

Local Public Finance Reform in China,” Second Annual International Symposium on Urban Planning and Land Policy, Lincoln Institute, Shenzhen, China, October 2006.

Public Finance Concepts for Planners,” Fiscal Dimensions of Planning Seminar, Lincoln Institute of Land Policy, Cambridge, Massachusetts, July 24, 2006.

Housing and Poverty in the USA, 1985-2005,” World Planning Schools Congress, Mexico City, July 14, 2006.

The Rapid Development of China’s Urban Transportation Systems: Opportunities, Challenges and Policies,” China Planning Network 3rd Annual Conference, Beijing, June 14, 2006.

Smart Growth in the U.S. and the Pearl River Delta Region,” World Planning Scholars Lecture 1, China Planning Network, Zhongshan University, Guangzhou, China, June 12, 2006.

Lectures on Land Use,” Lincoln Institute of Land Policy and PRC Ministry of Land Resources, Qingdao, China, June 10-11, 2006.

“Public Finance and Urban Development Strategies in China,” invited, Symposium on Important Issues in the Era of Rapid Urbanization in China, Lincoln Institute of Land Policy, Cambridge, Massachusetts, May 22, 2006.

Formal/Informal: A Perspective on China,” invited, Center for Architecture and People’s Architecture, New York City, May 16, 2006.

“Growth and Growth Impacts in the South San Francisco Bay Area,” invited, Social Science Dimensions Workshop: Identifying Political, Economic, and Social Obstacles and Opportunities, South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project, Mountain View, California, April 18, 2006.

“Sex, Race and Roads: New Research on Shelter and Travel,” invited, Department of City Regional Planning, Cornell University, April 12, 2006.

“Suburbanization and Its Discontents: What We Do and Don’t Know About How to Plan the Built Environment,” invited, Department of Urban Planning, Columbia University, April 10, 2006.

“The American University of Cairo/UCLA Environmental Studies Initiative,” American University of Cairo, Egypt, April 3, 2006.

Smart Growth with Chinese Characteristics,” invited, Changsha University of Science and Technology, Xiantang, and Chinese Academy of Urban Planning and Design, Beijing, China, December 2005.

“Four Lectures on Sprawl, Suburbanization, and Alternatives,” Lincoln Institute of Land Policy Workshop, Changsha, Hunan Province, China, December 2005.

For a Few Dollars Less: Estimating and Regulating the Costs & Benefits of Wal-Mart,” invited, Economic Impact Research Conference: An In-Depth Look at Wal-Mart and Society, Washington DC, November 2005. (with D. Chatman)

“3 Questions for the American Housing Survey, 1985-2003,” invited, Ziman Center for Real Estate, UCLA, November 2005.

“Is the Gender Gap History? Commuting in America,” ACSP, Kansas City, October 2005.

Emerging Planning Trends in Retail: The Case of Wal-Mart,” invited, Urban Growth Seminar, USC, September 2005. (with M. Manville)

“Housing Affordability, Regulatory Obstacles, and Smart Growth,” invited, Annual Real Estate Conference, Ziman Center for Real Estate, UCLA, September 2005.

“Traffic and Mobility: FAQ,” 2005 Corporate Partners Summit, Bren School of Environmental Science & Management, UC Santa Barbara, May 2005.

Urban Development & Foreign Models in the New China,” ChinaPlan Conference, MIT, May 2005.

 

Selected Publications

People or Place?
Author: Crane, Randall and Michael Manville
Subtitle: Revisiting the Who Versus the Where of Urban Development
Description: One of the longest standing debates in community economic development is between “place-based” and “people-based” approaches to combating poverty, housing affordability, chronic unemployment, and community decline. Should help go to distressed places or distressed people?
Publication Link: PDF

Planning for accessibility
Description: “Planning for accessibility,” in G. Hack, E. Birch, P. Sedway and M. Silver, eds., Local Planning: Contemporary Principles and Practice, ICMA, 2009. (with L. Takahashi)
Publication Link: ICMA

Counterpoint: Accessibility and sprawl
Description: “Counterpoint: Accessibility and sprawl,” Journal of Transport and Land Use 1:1, Summer 2008.
Publication Link: Journal of Transport and Land Use

 

Other Publications

Public Finance Concepts for Urban Planners,” in S. White and N. Kotval, eds. Financing Economic Development in the 21st Century, M.E. Sharpe, 2013.

The Oxford Handbook of Urban Planning, Oxford University Press, 2012 (Co-edited with Rachel Weber)

Planning as Scholarship: Origins and Prospects,” in R. Weber and R. Crane, eds., The Oxford Handbook of Urban Planning, Oxford Univ. Press, 2012 (with R. Weber)

Toward a Second Generation of Land-Use/Travel Studies: Theoretical and Empirical Frontiers,” in N. Brooks, K. Donaghy and G. Knaap, eds., The Oxford Handbook of Urban Economics and Planning, Oxford Univ. Press, 2012 (with Z. Guo)

Planning for Climate Change: Assessing Progress and Challenges,” Journal of the American Planning Association 76, 2010, pp. 389-401(with J. Landis)

Sex Changes Everything: The Recent Narrowing and Widening of Travel Differences by Gender,” Public Works Management & Policy 13, 2009, 328-337. (with L. Takahashi)

 

“Is there a quiet revolution in women’s travel? Revisiting the gender gap in commuting,” Journal of the American Planning Association 73, Summer, pp. 298-316, 2007.

Public finance challenges for Chinese urban development,” in Y. Song and C. Ding, eds. Urbanization in China: Critical Issues in an Era of Rapid Growth. Cambridge: Lincoln Institute of Land Policy, 2007

Emerging planning challenges in retail: The case of Wal-Mart,” Journal of the American Planning Association 71, Autumn 2005. (with M. Boarnet, D. Chatman and M. Manville).

Central-local transfers in Kenya – Options for incremental reform,” International Development Planning Review 26 (1), February 2004.

Supercenters and the Transformation of the Bay Area Grocery Industry: Issues, Trends, and Impacts. San Francisco: Bay Area Economic Forum. (with M. Boarnet, D. Chatman and M. Manville), 2004.

“Transport in the urban core,” in D. Hensher, et al., eds. Handbook of Transport Geography and Spatial Systems. Elsevier, 2004. (with E. Blumenberg)

“Job sprawl and the journey to work in the USA,” in Chang-Hee Christine Bae and Harry W. Richardson, eds. Urban Sprawl in Western Europe and the United States. London: Ashgate, 2004. (with D. Chatman)

“Decentralizing Indonesia in 2004: Implications and recommendations for basic education,” RTI/USAID Report, November 2004.

As jobs sprawl, whither the commute?Access 23, 2003 (with D. Chatman)

Traffic and sprawl: Evidence for U.S. commuting, 1985 to 1997,” Planning & Markets 6 (1), September 2003. (with D. Chatman)

Transport and sustainability: The role of the built environment,” Built Environment 29 (3), 2003. (with L. Schweitzer)

Travel by Design: The Influence of Urban Form on Travel, Oxford University Press, 2001. (with M. Boarnet)

The influence of land use on travel behavior: Estimation and specification issues,” Transportation Research A 35, 2001. (with M. Boarnet)

The impacts of urban form on travel: An interpretive review,” Journal of Planning Literature 15, pp. 3-23, August 2000.

“A study to prepare urban development and management strategies for the City of Taiz, Yemen,” Ministry of Housing, Construction and Urban Planning, Government of Yemen and the World Bank, August 2000.

“A study to prepare urban development and management strategies for the City of Sana’a, Yemen,” Ministry of Housing, Construction and Urban Planning, Government of Yemen and the World Bank, August 2000.

Public finance and transit-oriented planning: Evidence from Southern California,Journal of Planning Education and Research 17, 1998. (with M. Boarnet)

Who are the suburban homeless and what do they want? An empirical study of the demand for public services,” Journal of Planning Education and Research 18, 1998. (with L. Takahashi)

Travel by Design?Access 12, 1998.

L.A. Story: A reality check for transit-based housing,” Journal of the American Planning Association 63, Spring 1997. (with M. Boarnet)

The contributions of environmental amenities to low income housing: A comparative study of Bangkok and Jakarta,” Urban Studies 34, pp. 1495-1512, 1997. (with A. Daniere and S. Harwood)

Does neighborhood design influence travel? A behavioral analysis of travel diary and GIS data,”Transportation Research D: Transport and Environment 3, pp. 225-238, 1998. (with R. Crepeau)

Measuring access to basic services in global cities: Descriptive and behavioral approaches,” Journal of the American Planning Association 62, Spring 1996. (with A. Daniere)

The influence of uncertain job location on urban form and the journey to work,” Journal of Urban Economics 39, 1996.

Cars and drivers in the new suburbs: Linking access to travel in neotraditional planning,” Journal of the American Planning Association 62, Winter 1996.

Efficient local charity with self selection,” Public Choice 86, 1996.

On form versus function: Will the New Urbanism reduce traffic, or increase it?,” Journal of Planning Education and Research 15, 1996.

The market value of environmental improvements in alternative fiscal regimes,” Journal of Regional Science 35, 1995.

Mexico City’s Water Supply: Improving the Outlook for Sustainability, A National Research Council Report of the Joint Academies Committee on the Mexico City Water Supply. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press, 1995.

Water markets, market reform, and the urban poor: Results from Jakarta, Indonesia,” World Development 22, 1994.

Chris Tilly

Chris Tilly studies labor markets, inequality, urban development, and public policies directed toward better jobs.

He is particularly interested in understanding how combinations of institutions and markets generate unequal labor outcomes, and in how public policy and collective action can successfully be directed toward improving and equalizing such outcomes. Within this framework, Professor Tilly has examined part-time and contingent work, gender and racial disparities, job mobility, and other issues.

While continuing to conduct research on workplace issues in the United States, Professor Tilly has increasingly undertaken comparative research on countries including Brazil, China, India, Korea, Mexico, and South Africa, along with several European countries.  His areas of greatest expertise are the United States, Mexico, and Latin America.

In addition to conducting scholarly research, he served for 20 years (1986-2006) as a coeditor of Dollars and Sense, a popular economics magazine, and frequently conducts research for advocacy groups, community organizations, and labor unions. He served on the Program Committee and later the Board of Directors of Grassroots International from 1991-2003, ending that time as the Chair of the Board.

Before becoming an academic, he spent eight years doing community and labor organizing.

For more about Tilly’s current research, view his web page.

Abel Valenzuela

Abel Valenzuela is Professor of Chicano Studies and Urban Planning and Director of UCLA’s Institute for Research on Labor and Employment.  He has authored numerous research articles, books, and reports on immigrant settlement, work, and urban poverty.  His research on day labor and immigrant labor markets have helped frame national public and policy narratives on immigrant and low-wage workers.

Los Angeles occupies a central focus of his research and teaching and guides the Institute’s research directions. Abel was born and raised in Los Angeles, earned his bachelor’s degree from the University of California at Berkeley and his M.C.P. and Ph.D from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

He has published numerous articles and technical reports on low-wage workers, including co-editing (with Lawrence Bobo, Melvin Oliver, and Jim Johnson) Prismatic Metropolis: Inequality in Los Angeles published by the Russell Sage Foundation in 2000, Immigration and Crime: Race, Ethnicity, and Violence (with Ramiro Martinez Jr.). He has also published in American Behavioral Scientist, Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, Annual Review of Sociology, New England Journal of Public Policy, Working USA: A Journal of Labor and Society, International Journal of Comparative Sociology, and Regional Studies.

Abel lives in Venice Beach with his wife and three sons.

 

Selected Publications

Paul Apostolidis and Abel Valenzuela Jr.  2014.  “Cosmopolitan Politics and the Migrant Day Labor Movement.”  Politics, Groups, and Identities.  Vol. 2(2):222-244.

Valenzuela Jr., A.  2014.  “Regulating Day Labor: Worker Centers and Organizing in the Informal Economy.”  In The Informal City: Settings, Strategies, Responses (Eds) Vinit Mukhija and Anastasia Loukaitou-Sidris.  Cambridge, MA:  MIT Press.  Pgs 261-276.

Bostic, R.W., A. M. Kim, and A. Valenzuela Jr. 2016.  Guest Co-editors.  Symposium: Contesting the Streets.  Cityscape: A Journal of Policy Development and Research. Volume 18, Number 1: Pgs, 3-122.

Theodore, N., D. Blaauw, C. Schenck, A. Valenzuela Jr., C. Schoeman, E. Melendez.  2015.  “Day Labor, Informality and Vulnerability in South Africa and the United States.”  International Journal of Manpower.  Vol. 36 No. 6: 1-18.

Areas of Expertise: economy, jobs low-wage workers, day labor, immigration, urban poverty, urban planning, inequality

Goetz Wolff

Goetz Wolff’s research and teaching interest center on equity and economic development issues—in particular the reciprocal roles of industries and regions in shaping each other.

His current work identifies and promotes economic development policies that address the consequences of economic restructuring in the Southern California region. He works extensively with organized labor, as well as community organizations, public and non-profit agencies, and the private sector.

Wolff teaches courses on Sectoral Analysis, The Southern California Regional Economy. He has taught two courses focusing on Wal-Mart and “walmartization.” The first course analyzed Wal-Mart’s success and impacts, and the second dealt with responses by labor, community, environmental, and small businesses to Wal-Mart. The courses culminated in a major conference “Is Wal-Mart Good for America?” with over 500 participants.

 

RECENT PUBLICATIONS

Policy and Community in Los Angeles Economic Development
chapter in David Sloan (ed.) Planning Los Angeles.  Chicago:  American Planning Association, 2012.

What Aspect of Critical Planning Should We Be Concerned With?
Critical Planning Vol 15, 2008.

 

CURRENT PROJECTS

Social Media, Insecure Work and New Conceptions of Labor Solidarity
a joint UCLA/UC-Davis research project funded by UC-Humanities Network.

Revitalizing Manufacturing Industry and Jobs in Los Angeles
an 18 month research project in collaboration with USC Program for Environmental and Regional Equity (PERE)], LAANE, and Green for All (Surdna Foundation)

From Farms to Waste and/or Recycling:  Assessing and Improving the Jobs in the California Food Chain
For the California Labor Federation and the LA Food Policy Council.

Clean Up / Green Up:  Developing Green Zones for the City of Los Angeles
For Liberty Hill Foundation

 

PREVIOUS WORK

From 1999-2004 he served as the Research Director of the 800,000 member Los Angeles County Federation of Labor, AFL-CIO and director of the Center for Regional Employment Strategies (CRES).

He served as Executive Director of the Harry Bridges Institute in San Pedro for three years, now serves as board member

His consulting practice, Resources for Employment and Economic Development, has included a variety of clients and projects:

Project Director, City of Los Angeles Community Development Department, “Industry Cluster Initiative for Employment Training;”

Assessing the status and trends of the Los Angeles garment industry for workers and contractors in the region, supported by the Rosenberg Foundation;

Developing a research program on Global Logistics (the new international web of production, transportation, distribution and sales that is reshaping the role and status of workers and communities) for the International Longshore and Warehouse Union (ILWU).

Industry/Labor Market Consultant for the California Labor Federation,  Workforce and Economic Development Program

Strategic Planning Consultant for the United Way of Greater Los Angeles Workforce Development Project.

Southern California Workplace Lead Project (UCLA LOSH)—providing guidance and strategy for identifying and analyzing sectors in which workers are exposed to high lead levels

Los Angeles Manufacturing Action Project (LAMAP)—of which he was cofounder—a multi-union effort to assist in the organizing of low-wage, largely immigrant Latino workers in the industrial core of Los Angeles

Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC)—providing sectoral research on the health industry which led to a multi-million dollar economic development initiative

MultiCultural Collaborative (MCC)—developing tools to support alternative economic development strategies for minority and disadvantaged communities in Los Angeles

City of Los Angeles—review and develop proposals for rationalizing economic development in the City

Southern California Edison (SCE)—developing the Apparel Industry Roundtable, and supporting sub-regional economic development cooperation among cities, agencies, and the private sector in a period of industrial restructuring.

 

COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT

Los Angeles Food Policy Council, and Co-Chair Good Food Economy Working Group

Southern California Library for Social Studies and Research [“The Peoples’ Library: Working for a world where all people have the ability, resources, and freedom to make their own histories”].  Emeritus Board member, including having served four years as President

AFL-CIO Labor Community Services, board member

United Way of Greater Los Angeles, Community Investment Cabinet member

Diane Middleton Foundation [ “to support fundamental change through struggles for economic justice and projects that address community and labor organizing, civil rights and civil liberties, labor education, and training a new generation of leaders”], board member.

 

COURSES TAUGHT

Sectoral Analysis

Urban and Regional Economic Development

Southern California Regional Economy

Labor and Economic Development

 

Special two-quarter courses:

Walmart and Walmartization (Community Scholars, 2005)

Roadmap to Green Manufacturing (Comp Project, 2012)

Evelyn Blumenberg

Evelyn Blumenberg’s research examines the effects of urban structure — the spatial location of residents, employment, and services — on economic outcomes for low-wage workers, and on the role of planning and policy in shaping the spatial structure of cities.

Her recent projects include analyses of the residential location and travel behavior of young adults, the travel behavior of immigrants, the relationship between automobile ownership and employment outcomes among the poor, and predatory auto lending.

Professor Blumenberg was honored in 2014 as a White House Champion of Change for her research on the links between transportation access, employment, and poverty.

Professor Blumenberg holds a bachelor’s degree in political science from the University of California, Berkeley, and a master’s degree and Ph.D. in urban planning from the University of California, Los Angeles.

She teaches courses on planning history and theory, research design, poverty and inequality, transportation and poverty, and urban policy.

LinkedIn profile

SELECTED BOOKS & PUBLICATIONS

A Driving Factor in Mobility? Transportation’s Role in Connecting Subsidized Housing and Employment Outcomes in the Moving to Opportunity (MTO) Program
Forthcoming in the Journal of the American Planning Association.

Brother Can you Spare a Ride? Carpooling in Immigrant Neighborhoods
Published in Urban Studies, 51(9), 2014.

Civil Liberties and the Regulation of Public Space: The Case of Sidewalks in Las Vegas
Blumenberg, Evelyn and Renia Ehrenfeucht (2008). “Civil Liberties and the Regulation of Public Space: The Case of Sidewalks in Las Vegas,” Environment and Planning A, 40(2): 303-322.