Career Counseling

Make a 30- or 45-minute appointment with a Luskin Career Counselor for Public Affairs-specific guidance on your career and internship search, in-person and digital branding (including elevator pitch, resume, cover letter, and LinkedIn), networking, offer negotiation, and other career-related topics. If you are interested in an appointment to discuss your resume, we highly recommend first using UCLA’s VMock prior to your appointment.

VMock will offer preliminary suggestions on your resume so we are able maximize your career counseling appointment to take your resume to the next level.

Please attach your resume to your appointment in CareerHub. If you choose to make an appointment first and email your resume later, please do so no later than 24 hours in advance of your appointment so that we have ample time to provide intentional feedback on your resume.

If you do not send us your resume in advance to your appointment, we will cancel your appointment and ask you to reschedule at a later time.

To sign up for a career counseling appointment with either career counselor, follow the instructions below: 

  • Login to CareerHub using your UCLA login credentials.
  • Click “Appointments” on the left-hand navigation bar.
  • You are assigned a Career Counselor based on your last name to ensure an equitable caseload.
  • Select a time block that has your preferred time in it, which works for your schedule.
  • Click “Book Appointment” and you’ll be prompted to select the appointment type, select the time, and attach any relevant documents (resume/cover letter) directly to the appointment.

Note: Appointment availability is updated on CareerHub one week prior to the beginning of the subsequent academic quarter.

If you want us to conduct a secondary review of your resume or cover letter after your career counseling appointment with us, you are welcome to make a follow-up appointment with us OR you can email us your updated resume or cover letter with the incorporated edits from our first appointment. We will provide our feedback on your updated resume via email within three business days.

What is VMock?

  • VMock is a 24-7 online resume review tool
  • Leverages data science, machine learning, natural language processing, criteria gathered from employers to provide instant personalized feedback on your resume
  • The system analyzes three areas – impact, presentation, and soft skills and offers feedback on highlighted areas to help make your resume stronger
  • Use the SMART Resume Editor to build a resume from scratch, or to edit a resume after receiving feedback. This feature is recommended only for those who are at the beginning stages of resume development

Why use VMock?

  • Receive an aggregate resume score to assess the strengths of your resume benchmarked against your own UCLA peer group
  • Improve the overall content of your resume with actionable and targeted bullet-by-bullet feedback

Additional Information on VMock

  • Focus on the feedback, not the score your resume is given. While the system will help you develop your resume with concrete feedback, the scoring is subjective
  • Students have 10 opportunities to upload a resume or rescore a resume each academic year
  • VMock is only able to process PDF files that were created using conventional word processing applications such as Microsoft Word

Events and Programs

UCLA Luskin Career Services offers programs and resources that are tailored to areas of interest within the fields of Public Policy, Social Welfare, and Urban Planning. Please see below for our upcoming workshops and additional information about the workshops we offer every academic year. If you are interested in more general career services topics (e.g. resume & cover letter workshops, LinkedIn workshops), please see the workshops held by UCLA’s Central Career Center.

Upcoming Luskin Professional Development Events and Workshops*

Visit CareerHub for more information and to RSVP (RSVP will open September 19). 

October 4 & 5: Professional LinkedIn Photos

October 20 12:30-1:30pm: State of California DGS Employer Information Session

October 26: 8-10am Senior Fellows Breakfast (by invitation only)

November 15 4-6:30pm: Fall Internship & Career Fair

*Luskin Graduate Student Professional Development Events and Workshops are posted one week prior to the subsequent academic quarter.

Alumni Career Panels (1x/quarter)

We invite Social Work, Urban Planning, and Public Policy alumni to speak with current students about their career trajectories and the processes involved when applying for public and private sector positions.

Career & Internship Fair (2x/year)

Typically held in Fall and Spring quarters, we invite over 50 employers to come discuss their graduate-level internships and opportunities post graduation exclusively with UCLA Luskin graduate students.

Career & Internship Search and Career Fair Preparation (2x/year)

These workshops shed light on best practices to search for an internship and to navigate our upcoming career fairs.

Career Planning and Management Course: M297F (1x/year)

A 2-unit graduate level course that covers professional branding, job search strategies, networking, and interviewing all with a public affairs lens and is typically offered in fall quarter.

City Hall Day

Each year, a City Hall legislator hosts UCLA Luskin graduate students to study an urban social policy issue important to his/her constituents.  The purpose of this event, co-sponsored by UCLA’s Office of Local Government Relations, is to promote careers in politics and public service as well as to engage UCLA with local government.

Conference of Mayors

Recipients of the Bohnett Fellowship are invited to participate in the annual United States Conference of Mayors’ Winter Meeting in Washington, D.C.

DEI in Career Development workshops (1x/quarter)

We partner with D3 initiative to offer culturally responsive career development workshops. (e.g. salary negotiations as a woman of color, navigating the workplace as a first generation professional, etc.)

Employer Information Sessions (4x/year)

Organizations and agencies that are of interest to our graduate students are invited to campus to talk about internship and career opportunities.

LinkedIn Headshots (1x/year)

We host a professional photographer to take our graduate students’ photos to use for their LinkedIn profiles and for graduate student research presenters to use at professional conferences, symposia, etc.

Professional Development Certifications, Societies and Pipelining Programs (1x/quarter)

Student learn about opportunities for post graduate fellowships and certifications.

Senior Fellows Brunch (1x/year)

The kick-off to the Senior Fellows mentoring program- the premiere mentoring program connecting UCLA Luskin graduate students to executive-level professionals in the public affairs field. This occurs in Fall Quarter.

Summer Career Bootcamp (1x/year)

Graduating students are invited to a two day event during the summer to jump start their job search. Topics covered include: Job search, Networking, Interviewing, and Offer Negotiation.

Yearlong & Summer Fellowship Information Sessions (2x/year)

Students will learn about yearlong fellowship opportunities (Bohnett Fellowships & Office of Child Protection) summer internship and fellowship funding opportunities, including the Michael S. Dukakis Internship, Public Service Fellowship, Liberty Hill Foundation Fellowship, Climate Resolve Internship, and the US Conference of Mayors Fellowship.

UCLA Central Career Center Events

Luskin Graduate Students may also attend events from UCLA’s Central Career Center. These tend to cover generalist topics from resume/cover letter to interview strategies; salary negotiations to “how to best use your first 90 days on the job.” To view their upcoming events and to register please visit: https://career.ucla.edu/events

To view other events hosted by other UCLA Luskin departments that may be of interest, please visit: https://luskin.ucla.edu/events 

Job and Internship Search

CareerHub is Luskin’s career management system. You will find internship and job opportunities specifically for Public Affairs graduate students. You can also register for workshops and programs in CareerHub.

Handshake is UCLA’s campus-wide platform that connects Bruins with internships, jobs and career opportunities. Use Handshake to find workshops, events, other career development programs hosted by the UCLA Career Center and to schedule counseling appointments with Career Center advisors.

Log-in Handshake, click on ‘Career Center’ and select ‘Resources’ to access GoinGlobal. This is a resource for job/internship search throughout the US and abroad. Obtain expert advice on CV, resume, work permit & visa requirements for work abroad. Identify companies who have submitted H1B visa applications.

The University of California system and UCLA has licensing to access a variety of business databases to help students research companies for academic use. The following are ones that may be useful for students to learn more about specific organizations.

AtoZ databases: Target Company Lists
Creates custom lists from more than 30 million US business profiles filtered by geography, industry, public/private ownership, employee size, annual revenue, and more. The database also includes more than 2.3 million job listings, 1.1 million healthcare professionals, 2 million new businesses, and much more. Users must be connected to UCLA VPN in order to access the database for free.

Uniworld Online
Information on multinational firms operating around the world. The database may be searched by country, state, keyword, zipcode or postal code, industry code, revenue, and the number of employees. Users must be connected to UCLA VPN in order to access the database for free.

Glassdoor
Read reviews of companies and their management from current and former employees.

International/NGO

DevEx

NGO Job Board 

Worldwide NGO Directory

Non-Profit

Dan’s List

Idealist

IMDiversity

Nonprofit Career Network

Opportunity Knocks

Social Work

API Social Work Council

Delta-T Group

NASW JobLink 

School Social Work jobs

Social Work Job Bank

Philanthropy

Council on Foundations

Philanthropy News Digest

Public Policy

Public Service Careers

Urban Planning

APA American Planning Association

Dayaway

Ecojobs

Environmental Career

Environmental Defense Fund

Geography Jobs

Green Jobs

Green Jobs Network

GreenBiz Jobs

The Nature Conservancy

Planetizan

Green Dream Jobs

Urban Land Institute

USGBC (US Green Building Council)

Getting a Public Sector Job

General

Career Builder Job search site

Indeed Job search site

Koya Leadership Partners Executive searches

LinkedInJobs 

Zip Recruiter

Government

Federal

USA Jobs

State

CalCareers

ICMA International City/County Management Association

NCSL Jobs National Conference of State Legislature

Regional 

ABAG (Association of Bay Area Governments)

Bay Area Careers

DC Jobs Jobs in the Washington, D.C. area

SACOG Sacramento Area Council of Governments

SANDAG (San Diego Association of Governments)

SCAG (Southern California association of Governments)

County

Los Angeles

Orange

Riverside

San Bernardino

Ventura

Other California Counties California State Association of Counties

Counties in other States National Association of Counties

City Governments

Beverly Hills

Culver City

Inglewood

Long Beach

Los Angeles

Santa Monica

West Hollywood

Other California Cities CA League of Cities

Other US Cities National League of Cities (NLC)

ONET Online
A tool for career exploration and job analysis.

Occupational Outlook Handbook Career and industry trends, salaries, and job outlook

StrengthsFinder Understand your strengths and unlock your potential

Life Values Inventory  Clarify values and guide decision making

MBTIonline Careers Find career satisfaction by matching your MBTI results to occupations that best fit your unique personality, and predicting how likely it is that you’ll be satisfied in those occupations.

Imagine PhD
A career exploration and planning tool for PhD students in the Humanities and Social Sciences.

  • ACLU of Northern California
  • Alliance for a Better Community (ABC)
  • Alliance for Children’s Rights
  • Alzheimer’s Los Angeles
  • American Planning Association
  • American Red Cross
  • Amigos de los Rios
  • Anaheim Unified High School District
  • Anthem Inc.
  • Anti-Eviction Mapping Project
  • Bank of China
  • Buro Happold
  • Bytedance
  • California Charter Schools Association
  • California Community Colleges
  • California Conservation Corps, State of California government
  • California Department of Finance
  • California Home Builders
  • California Housing Partnership (CHPC)
  • California Policy Lab
  • Caltrans
  • Caltrans District 7
  • Capital Fellows Program
  • Capital One
  • CARE
  • Centinela Valley Union High School District
  • Children’s Defense Fund
  • China Central Television Station
  • City and County of San Francisco
  • City of Chicago
  • City of Culver City, Transportation Department
  • City of Dublin
  • City of Fremont
  • City of Long Beach
  • City of Los Angeles
  • City of Mountain View
  • City of Oakland Department of Transportation
  • City of Santa Monica
  • City of West Hollywood
  • Climate Resolve
  • Communities for a Better Environment
  • Communities in Schools of Los Angeles & United American Indian Involvement
  • Congressional Hispanic Caucus
  • Consulting Firm
  • Consumer Reports
  • Cottie Petrie-Norris for Assembly 2020
  • County of Marin
  • County of San Mateo
  • Crete Academy
  • DCFS
  • DDOT (District Department of Transportation)
  • Domestic Abuse Center
  • Downtown Women’s Center
  • Dulce Vasquez for LA City Council Campaign
  • Edelman Outpatient (DMH directly operated
  • Education Pioneers
  • ELP Advisors
  • Environmental Defense Fund
  • Estolano Advisors
  • Evolve Treatment Center
  • Family Service of Santa Monica
  • Fehr & Peers
  • Fellowship at the Los Angeles Mayor’s Office
  • Freedom for Immigrants
  • Harbor UCLA AOP
  • Harbor UCLA Medical Center
  • Harbor UCLA Medical Center FSP
  • Hawthorne High School
  • Here LA
  • Housing Authority of the City of Los Angeles
  • HR&A Advisors Inc.
  • iACT
  • Internship with Global Lab for Research in Action
  • Jamboree Housing Corporation
  • JETRO Los Angeles
  • Jewish Family Service of Los Angeles
  • JUNTOS Wellness Center
  • Kimberlina Whettam & Associates
  • Kimley Horn & Associates
  • Kittelson @ Associates
  • Kounkuey Design Institute
  • LADOT (same as full-time job)
  • LA LGBT Center (Policy Dept)
  • LAUSD
  • LAUSD City of Angels
  • LAUSD school mental health
  • LAUSD School Social Work
  • L.A Food Policy Council
  • LA Metro
  • LA Voice
  • Liberty Hill Foundation
  • Lift to Rise
  • Los Angeles Alliance for a New Economy
  • Los Angeles Business Council
  • Los Angeles City Council
  • Los Angeles County Supervisor’s Office
  • Los Angeles County Department of Arts and Culture
  • Los Angeles County Women and Girls Initiative
  • Los Angeles Department of Transportation
  • Los Angeles Dept of Veteran’s Affairs
  • Los Angeles LGBT Center and CASA LA
  • Los Angeles Office of the Mayor
  • Main Street America (through the National Trust)
  • Mayors GRYD office
  • Mayor’s Office of City Services
  • Microsoft – D.C.
  • Million Dollar Hoods
  • Motion Picture and Television Fund
  • National CAPACD
  • National Center for State Courts
  • National Park Service
  • NASW
  • NASW California
  • New Earth
  • NCCTS
  • NRDC
  • OC Public Works
  • Office of Congressman Tony Cardenas (CA-29)
  • Office of Mayor Garcetti
  • Olive View UCLA Medical Center
  • Pacific Clinics, Asian Pacific Family Center
  • Pacific Clinics, Monrovia
  • Para Los Ninos
  • Partnership for Los Angeles Schools
  • Post Authority of New York & New Jersey
  • Prevention Institute
  • Public Counsel Center for Veteran’s Advancement and Keystone Treatment Center
  • RAND Corporation
  • Robert & Patricia Switzer Foundation
  • Rural Investment to Protect our Environment (RIPE)
  • Saban Community Clinic
  • Santa Monica Office of Sustainability
  • SAJE
  • Shanghai Pudong Development Bank
  • Sherman Oaks Business Improvement District
  • SolveEducation!
  • Southern California Association of Governments
  • Southern California Edison
  • Southern California Grantmakers
  • Stantec Consulting
  • St. John’s Child and Family Development Center
  • Steer
  • Step Up on Second
  • TASC (Think Tank for Action on Social Change) Dublin, Ireland
  • The Advancement Group
  • The Alliance for Children’s Rights
  • The Clinton Foundation
  • The Greenlining Institute
  • The Trust for Public Land
  • UCLA Black Policy Project
  • UCLA Harbor Medical-Financial Partnership Program
  • UCLA Hospital (Gender Health Program)
  • UCLA Institute of Environment and Sustainability Impact Fellow
  • UCLA Residential Life
  • Union Station Homeless Services
  • U.S. Conference of Mayors
  • U.S. Office of Management and Budget
  • Urban Land Institute Los Angeles
  • US Department of Commerce
  • US Government Accountability Office
  • VA WLA
  • Venice Family Clinic
  • Vicus Planning
  • Walt Disney Global Public Policy Department
  • West End Family Counseling Services
  • White House Fellows Program
  • William S. Hart Union School District and DCFS
  • World Bank
  • World Resources Institute
  • World Trade Center, Los Angeles
  • YouthBuild

Mentoring and Networking Opportunities

Then, Congresswomen Karen Bass with her then mentee, Veronica Calkins (MSW candidate in 2015).

The Senior Fellows Program is the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs’ premier mentorship and networking program. Established in 1997, the Senior Fellows Program connects current graduate students in the Public Policy, Social Welfare, and Urban Planning masters programs to prominent community,  government, and business leaders in the public service arena. These influential executive-level professionals provide graduate students with: industry-specific guidance on preparing for a career in public service, an expanded professional network, access to professional spaces they may not have otherwise had access to, and opportunities to apply, synthesize, and critique the theory they learn in the classroom to the real-world.

Opportunity Examples

Each fellow-mentee relationship is different, as each mentee’s needs differ. However, some sample activities of past mentorship relationships included:

  • Discussing the Fellow’s career path/ informational interview
  • Shadowing the Fellow at work/committee meeting(s) or conference(s)
  • Seeking career development advice on resume, cover letter, job searching, elevator pitch, interviewing, and/or negotiating
  • Discussing leadership, management, and/or influence approach
  • Discussing identity/community specific issues (e.g. being a woman of color in a leadership role at the organization, discussing starting an LGBTQ employee resource group, etc.)
  • Discussing their professional response to current events and how that may differ from their personal response
  • Meeting additional individuals in your Senior Fellow’s network

Timeline

Exact dates for 2022-2023 academic year are TBD. 

  • September: Application will open! (Will be available on CareerHub and sent via email)
  • late September: Application closes
  • early October: Luskin staff and faculty match graduate students with Senior Fellows (space may be limited- not everyone is guaranteed a spot)
  • mid October: Mentors and Mentees are matched!
  • October 26 8am: Senior Fellows Brunch
  • October 26-June 2023: Mentors and Mentees meet either monthly or every other month

Expectations

  • Meet with your Fellow at least once/quarter.
  • Notify Kevin Medina (kmedina@luskin.ucla.edu) if you encounter any issues or would like to particularly highlight an unexpectedly positive experience.
  • Be engaged, inquisitive, and ready to learn and contribute.
  • Approach this learning in an open manner which includes dialoging across difference.

UCLA Luskin alumni often return to campus to share specialized skills or areas of expertise with current Luskin students. Topics of recent career panels include Careers in Transportation, Long Beach Management Training, Capital Fellows, Careers in Education Policy, Careers in Social Welfare, and Environmental Sustainability. Check Programs and Events for any upcoming alumni Panels.

UCLA ONE (Opportunity, Network and Experience) is your ONE-stop-shop for your professional needs and to connect with UCLA. Created to engage UCLA alumni and students, UCLA ONE serves as a resource for opportunities, events and professional development for Bruins worldwide. Please join the Luskin School of Public Affairs Group once you register.

Join the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs LinkedIn Group to network, post jobs, and meet alumni and current students.

Business Cards

As Luskin graduate students, you can order UCLA branded business cards! You must display your relationship with UCLA on the business card for your card to be approved.

Start your order with UCLA’s business card vendor

  • Register and create your design.
  • Print the quote that includes the amount of cards, total, and card design.
  • Bring this to your department (PP, SW, UP) along with a check payable to “UC Regents.” Please ask your department if they accept an alternative method payment.
  • Your business cards will take about 1-2 weeks to process for pick up.

Below are links to professional organizations we encourage you to research and potentially join. Being a part of a professional organizations allows you to network with folks in your field, get your name out there for potential job opportunities, stay abreast to changes in your field, find mentors, access resources, amongst other benefits.

https://faculty-resources.waldenu.edu/library/public-policy-administration/professional-organizations Provides a list of Public Policy and Public Administration professional organizations given below:

Public Policy & Public Administration Professional Organizations

Nonprofit Management Professional Organizations

https://www.socialworkers.org/ National Association of Social Workers site provides access to membership, career opportunities, advocacy, and more.

https://www.planning.org/ The American Planning Association provides access to membership, a career center, professional development conferences, policy and advocacy, and much more.

Career Development Resource Library

Networking

Networking is one of the most important skills that job seekers need to master to be truly effective in their job  searches.  It has been reported that upwards of 60% of all jobs are secured through networking.  A well-developed career network can provide support, information and job leads.  There are a number ways to develop a career network – joining professional associations, attending industry-specific social events and conferences, setting up informational interviews, or even just meeting colleagues for lunch. Getting involved with your alumni association, participating in volunteer opportunities and actively utilizing LinkedIn are additional ways to expand your circle.

On-campus networks: Get involved to meet people with similar interests, different backgrounds, inspiring life paths and networks of their own. Consider joining student organizations, get to know your faculty advisor, and attend lectures and talks within your department, Luskin, and across campus.

Mentoring programs: Consider applying to the Senior Fellows program.

Professional associations: Become a member of professional associations for your field and concentration, consider attending conferences and local meetings.

An informational interview is a type of networking you conduct with an individual in a job or profession to gain a better understanding of the your field of interest. What you can gain from informational interviewing:

  • Learn how to best approach a job application
  • Learn how best to present yourself to a particular job or profession
  • Make professional connections and tap into the large hidden job market
  • Gather “inside information” to use when honing your resume and cover letter
  • Build your confidence in your ability to discuss your interests and how they match with a potential employer’s needs

Types of questions to ask:

  • What attracted you to the field?
  • Describe a typical day on the job.
  • What do you enjoy most/least about the work you do?
  • What personal and professional characteristics do you feel are important to this position or industry?
  • What trends and opportunities are developing?
  • What would be the best types of stepping stone positions I could take in order to gain the experience I need to do this job well?
  • What type of courses or education would you recommend?
  • What professional associations have you found useful?
  • What advice would you give to someone entering the field?

After the informational interview, write a thank you letter and contact anyone you were referred to for more information.

When attending networking functions, it is helpful to have your “elevator pitch” or “sound byte” prepared. This is a 20‐30 second statement that succinctly summarizes who you are, what you do (and what the value is),  what makes you unique, and your immediate goals.


Developing the Pitch

Imagine that you are standing in the elevator with a potential employer or business contact and you have 20 seconds to make an impression.   What would you like them to take away from the interaction?

Consider the following while preparing your pitch:

  1. What are your key strengths and positive qualities?
  2. What do you have to offer?
  3. Why are you interested in this company or this industry?
  4. How do you work to meet the types of problems/challenges facing this industry or position?
  5. What unique contributions will you make?

Example: My name is Sarah.  I’m a community builder and housing developer with GIS training.  I’m currently pursuing my master’s degree in urban planning at UCLA.  I’m bilingual and my experience includes designing multi-purpose residential units in small communities. Not only do I hire local talent, I recruit community leaders as volunteer project co-managers so I have the input of the neighborhood.


Continuing the Conversation

After the initial introduction, it is helpful to ask questions to keep the conversation flowing. Here are some questions that you can ask if your conversation comes to a lull:

  1. Tell me about what you What has your experience been like working there?
  2. What advice do you have for someone [that is getting ready to graduate from a master’s program; that is looking to transition into “x” field, etc.?]
  3. Would you mind telling me about the professional atmosphere at “x” company?
  4. How did you get involved in “x?” or What made you decide to do “y?”
  5. What do you like most about what you do?
  6. What do you see as the current trends in your field?
  7. What would make someone the ideal employee for your company/industry?
  8. Why did you choose this profession?
  9. What projects are you working on?
  10. What can you tell me about “x” firm?

Resumes and Cover Letters

Resume Content and Formatting Tips

A resume is a forward-thinking advertisement – it is marketing your successes and value to your target audience/department and not just describing tasks that you performed on a daily basis. It is NOT a laundry list of past responsibilities; it is promoting your transferable.

Content, Action, Result (C-A‐R)
Write accomplishment statements focusing on achievements, rather than just describing the situation. Focus on:

  • New processes or programs you implemented or initiated
  • Goals you accomplished
  • Problems you solved

Prove that you added value by showing results whenever possible. Demonstrate that you are contribution-focused.

Start bullets with action verbs as opposed to more generic phrases such as “responsible for,” “worked with,” “assisted,” etc. (See Action Verbs list on the following page)

Prioritize bullets based on their relevance to targeted company/position (most important at top).

Strategize: What are the five to seven key skills you are marketing that are relevant to your audience? Determine whether each bullet is clearly selling one of these

Update your resume regularly – make sure it is current. Include new events, awards, projects, responsibilities.

Bullet points are most effective when limited to only one to two lines of

Be concise and avoid redundancies. Consolidate related bullet points when possible. Every word counts. Are you expressing your point as concisely as possible?

Formatting: Keep it simple and clean. Style is important, but do not overuse italics, underlines or bold font. Avoid decorative bullets and

Watch for consistency throughout each section of the resume both in terms of format and content. For example, if the months are spelled out, then make sure all of the dates listed follow this same format.

For additional sample templates and action verbs, see the UCLA Graduate Student Career Preparation Toolkit.

If you want to meet with a career counselor to have your resume reviewed, we recommend that you upload your resume into VMock before your appointment. VMock will give you instant feedback on how you can improve your resume.  This will make the time you spend with a career counselor more productive.

MPP sample resume



A CV is primarily used when applying for academic and research positions. It may also be used as part of the fellowship and grant application package. A CV should include your academic background, teaching and research experience, publications, presentations, awards, honors, affiliations, among others.

Header & Footer

  • Include your name, address, phone number, and email address. If you plan to move while the CV is in use, include your current address and permanent address.
  • Number each page and include your name

Education

  • Include your PhD, institution, date expected, major or area of specialization
  • MA or MS, institution, date of degree, major and minor
  • BA or BS, institution, date of degree, major and minor

Dissertation

  • State the title and your dissertation chair
  • Include a four- or five-sentence abstract or summary addressing both the content and methodology

Research and Teaching Interests

  • Briefly describe your research and teaching interests, areas of specialization including areas outside your field

Honors and awards

  • Special distinctions associated with passing the MA and PhD exams
  • Fellowships, scholarship, grants-in-aid, etc.
  • Honorary awards received including those received at the bachelor’s level (avoid irrelevant non-academic awards)

Teaching experience

  • Position and institution
  • Descriptive titles of courses taught
  • Extent of experience (number of sections and quarters, semesters or years)

Research experience

  • Position, location, dates
  • Brief description of work conducted as it relates to the desired position

Publications

  • List all publications you are willing to show to a search committee; include URLs to papers accessible online
  • Include work in progress or submitted but not yet accepted

Other possible headings

  • Conference papers/research reports
  • Academic service (committee work)
  • Professional memberships (attendance at conferences/meetings can be noted)
  • Language skills – describe skill level (“reading knowledge,” or “fluent speaking ability”)
  • Additional work experience including research, consultation, and other experiences relevant to the type of position
  • Miscellaneous categories when relevant to teaching/research

For additional information and CV sample, see the UCLA Graduate Student Career Preparation Toolkit. See section for PhD students for additional resources.

Well‐written cover letters/emails are an extremely important part of the job search process. They are your opportunity to grab the employer’s attention, highlight relevant skills, experience and education, and illustrate what you know about the employer and the position.  Cover letters also provide an opportunity  for you to showcase your excellent writing and communication skills.

Before you start writing, consider the following:

  1. Know your Understand the value that you bring to the organization.
  2. What relevant skills, experience and education do you want to highlight for this particular position and organization?
  3. Know your Who will be reading this letter? What skills will they be looking for?
  4. Research the company. Show familiarity/understanding of the department and why your background would be of value to the role that you’re targeting.

Focus on the following:

  1. Customize/personalize your letters. Tailor EVERY cover letter you write to the organization and specific position. Always address the letter to an individual, not “to whom it may concern” unless you are unable to find this information. Use “Dear Hiring Manager” when the name is not available.
  2. Be positive and contribution-focused. Focus on what you have to offer.
  3. Be concise – in most cases, cover letters should be no longer than one page.
  4. Proofread! Mistakes or typographical errors convey a lack of attention to detail.
  5. Use action verbs when possible.
  6. Clearly express why you are a strong fit for the position and how you will contribute to the organization.


Interview Preparation

  • Prepare for your interview by getting your career goals in focus, identify your main strengths related to the job, and gather specific accomplishments to back up your skills.
  • Research the organization and review in advance the most common interview questions and behavioral interviewing techniques.
  • Find out the dress code in advance and dress appropriately.  Here are some guidelines.
  • Practice by yourself, a career counselor, or with a friend.
  • Use InterviewStream to practice interviewing anytime from a computer or mobile device and access over 7,000 general and industry-specific interview questions. Log-in to Handshake, select Career Center from the toolbar, then Resources.
  • For additional tips on successful interviewing, see the UCLA Career Guide and 10 Types of Interviews (and How to Ace Them).
  • First impressions count so be on time or a little bit early to allow yourself time to relax and feel comfortable.
  • Begin on a positive note.  Listen for open-ended questions and respond with your main strengths and skills plus examples to back them up.  For example:
    • “I think the most important thing I can offer you is…(main strength).”
    • “One example of this is…(specific proof).”
  • Send the right body language by relaxing and being yourself.  Sit erect, use gestures if they come naturally, and maintain good eye contact.
  • Speak clearly and concisely.  Keep your responses specific.  Ask for clarification if needed.
  • Let the interviewer set the tempo but be prepared to take the initiative if you’re not getting the opportunity to make your points.
  • Ask relevant questions to increase your understanding of the job.
  • Ask about their timetable.
  • Close positively, end the interview as you started it by emphasizing your main strength.
  • Write a thank you letter or email to all you interviewed with.  Add any pertinent information you might have left out of the interview and reiterate your interest in the job.  See a sample thank you note.
  • Keep an organized log of names and contact information along with interview dates.
  • Take any additional steps suggested by the interviewer, (completing an application, talking to others, sending a transcript or portfolio).

In addition to the in-person interview, it is common for organizations to conduct a phone or video interview as a first-round screening to determine if you’re a fit to come in for a full interview. You prepare for it just as you would for an in-person interview with some key adjustments to accommodate technology.

  • Rehearse. Ask a friend or colleague to do a mock interview with you so you can feel comfortable responding as you would in an in-person interview.
  • Prepare in advance. Be ready at least 5 minutes prior to the time the employer is scheduled to call you. Relax and review your materials as you wait for the call. Have water nearby in case you need
  • Prevent interruptions. Silence phones and find a quiet place to conduct the interview. If you share a living space, post a “Do Not Disturb” sign. Test your Skype/video platform, headset, and internet connection beforehand.
  • Use your notes. This is one main benefit to phone or video interview.
  • “Dress” for an interview. Putting on smart, interview-style clothes before your scheduled telephone or video interview can help you to focus and get into a professional mindset.
  • Smile. If you make yourself smile during the conversation, you physically become more relaxed and, as a consequence, your voice will sound more confident, friendly and assertive. You will come across much better when speaking.
  • Lighting and surroundings. Pay attention to lighting and glare when you are doing a video interview. You do not want the interviewer to be distracted from your responses.

For additional tips on successful interviewing, see the UCLA Career Guide and 10 Types of Interviews (and How to Ace Them).

Questions That Your Resume and/or Cover Letter Should Answer

  • Why do you think you’ll be a good fit for this company? What are your qualifications for this position?
  • What personal and professional qualifications do you possess that have allowed you to be successful in your field?
  • What specific strengths did you bring to the table?
  • What has been your most important work-‐‐related contribution? What were your most significant accomplishments in your last job?
  • What is the most important thing you’ve learned from your previous experience that will enable you to be successful in your next position?
  • What personality traits do you possess that you think are necessary to succeed in this field?
  • What is the most significant improvement in (your field or area of expertise) that you have achieved in the last year?
  • What can you do for us if we hire you?

Questions for Recent Graduates

  • What made you choose this field?
  • Why did you attend this particular school?
  • How does your degree prepare you for a career in this industry?
  • What natural skills do you possess that made this the ideal academic and career choice? How will your education help you to excel at a job here?
  • What qualifications do you have, beyond your academic achievements that will enable you to excel or succeed within our company?
  • Do you think your grades are a good indicator of your ability to succeed here?
  • What other types of positions and companies are you considering right now?

Questions for Assessment

  • What are your long-range and short-range goals and objectives and how are you preparing yourself to meet them?
  • What rewards are the most important to you in your chosen occupation?
  • What expectations do you have in terms of earnings in five years?
  • What do you consider to be your strengths and weaknesses?
  • How would you describe yourself?

Questions for Fit

  • What qualifications do you have that make you think you will be successful in this field?
  • What do you think it takes to be successful in our organization?
  • In what ways can you contribute to our organization?
  • Describe the relationship that should exist between a supervisor and employee.
  • What factors are most important to you in your job?

Knowledge of Employer Questions

  • Why are you interested in working for us?
  • What do you know about our organization?
  • Do you prefer a small, medium, or large organization?
  • What criteria are you using to evaluate the organization for which you want to work?
  • Do you have a geographical preference?  Why?

Behavioral Questions within Themes

Champion the Mission

  • Understands the Mission: What makes you optimistic that our organization will continue to Thrive?
  • Motivated to work for our mission: Outside the role you’re interviewing for, why are you interested in being at this organization?
  • Participates in a community of culture: Tell me about a time that you’ve felt the most motivated or successful. Why?
  • Prioritizes a mission over self-interest: What is something you’ve worked hard towards in the past for no other reason than you were passionate about it?
  • Cares for others: What’s the most compassionate thing you have done for someone else in the last 6 months?
  • Encourages participation: Tell me of a time you championed someone else’s work?
  • Listens and communicates: Tell me about a time you disagreed with someone. How did you resolve it?

Entrepreneur

  • Bold: Tell me about a time you’ve done something you consider risky in either your personal or work life?
  • Imagines the ideal outcome: What’s one big problem in the world that you are passionate about solving? How?
  • Resourceful: If you woke up tomorrow and didn’t have to worry about money for a year, how would you spend your time?

Embrace the Adventure

  • Curious: When is the last time you had a big change in perspective? Who changed your mind?
  • Owns and learns from mistakes: What is something that’s challenging for you that you’re still working on?
  • Optimistic: Tell me about a time something important to you didn’t go as planned. What did you do?

Questions Job Candidates May Want to Ask During Interviews

  • What do you see as this position’s primary responsibilities on a daily/weekly basis?
  • How, if at all, do you see these responsibilities changing over time? What do you feel are the most important responsibilities of this position?
  • What are some additional aspects of this position that are unique to your company? What are this company’s current challenges?
  • What do you view as this company’s greatest goals and missions?
  • Has this company experienced a downsizing at any time in its history, and if so, when? What do like the most about your position here?
  • What is the work environment like day to day?
  • Is there anything else I should know about this company?
  • Are there any aspects of my skills or background that you would like to hear more about?
  • How would my performance be measured and how is successful performance usually rewarded? Can you describe your organizational culture?
  • Where does this position fit into the organization? What kind of person are you looking for?
  • What problems might I expect to encounter on this job? Tell me about promotions and advancement in this company.
  • What are your expectations of the person hired for this position?
  • What are the three most significant things that need to be accomplished in this position in the first year and what do you foresee as the major hurdles?
  • Describe the performance evaluation procedures you use.
  • When can I expect to hear from you about the next stage in the interviewing process?

Resources

InterviewStream is an online platform to practice interviewing anytime from a computer or mobile device and contains over 7,000 general and industry-specific interview questions. Log-in to Handshake, select Career Center from the toolbar, then Resources.

Salary Negotiation

Understand your base requirements, which can be calculated using the following:

1. Your living wage – the minimum income requirements you need in order to cover basic requirements such as rent or mortgage, utilities, groceries, and car/transportation.

2. Your current worth – research pay scales for individuals at your current skill and qualification level, position, industry, location, and business climate.

3. Top of the scale – for your position, industry, location, and business climate.

Once you have determined your worth based on the job market and your salary requirements, decide on an amount that you want and what you’ll accept before starting negotiations. See the UCLA Career Guide: Negotiating a Compensation Package for the monthly worksheet and more detailed tips for negotiating salaries.

PayScale
Information based on salary surveys, salary and compensation information and analysis. Includes evaluations for job offers or raises, and salary in your current position.

The Occupational Outlook Handbook
Statistics on targeted position or potential career path, including educational requirements, national salary levels, working environment, and more.

Salary.com
Compare what positions are paying in your choice of industry and location based on years of experience and education.

SalaryExpert.com
A leading provider of online compensation data, including salary comparison, serving both individual employees and HR/Compensation professionals.

UCLA Salary Calculator and Resources
Enables students and alumni to estimate anticipated salary levels for several occupations, factoring in career titles, geographical location, education, and more.

Professional Associations and Journals

CareerOneStop Professional Association Finder
Locate national professional associations by occupation or industry served.

Directory of Associations
Search for over 36,000 associations worldwide

Company Research

AtoZ databases: Target Company Lists
Creates custom lists from more than 30 million US business profiles filtered by geography, industry, public/private ownership, employee size, annual revenue, and more. The database also includes more than 2.3 million job listings, 1.1 million healthcare professionals, 2 million new businesses, and much more. Users must be connected to UCLA VPN in order to access the database for free.

Uniworld Online
Information on multinational firms operating around the world. The database may be searched by country, state, keyword, zipcode or postal code, industry code, revenue, and the number of employees. Users must be connected to UCLA VPN in order to access the database for free.

Vault
Access in-depth information on what it’s like to work in an industry, company or profession and gain insight on how to position yourself to land a job or internship. To access Vault, log-in into your Handshake account, click on ‘Career Services’ and go to ‘Resources.’

Resources for Supervisors

Below are resources on how to be culturally sensitive, not perpetuate cycles of inequity, and make the workplace more equitable for all employees.

HiresDS Resource/service for inclusion and accessibility for people with disabilities. 

AskJAN Job accommodation resource for people with disabilities.

 Catalyst Equity for women.

Out & Equal Resources for LGBTQ+ inclusion in the workplace.

2023 CEI Criteria Evolution: Toolkit and FAQ Allies / Support.

NCDA  Career development support for those with psychiatric disabilities.

Identity & Community Specific Career Development Resources

UCLA Luskin Career Services is committed to taking a holistic approach to career services. We understand that we must be culturally responsive in order to provide the best career preparation support possible to Luskin graduate students with myriad intersectional identities and experiences. We are partnering with Luskin’s D3 Initiative in order to offer robust resources and workshops. Please regularly check back on this tab in order to view our ever-growing resource library for traditionally under-resourced communities. Please see our “events and programs” tab to view our upcoming equity, diversity, and inclusion centered programs related to career services. We also encourage you to reach out to your Luskin Career Counselor for an appointment to discuss identity/community specific issues that may be affecting your job/internship search, interview, etc. (e.g. approaching salary negotiations as woman and/or person of color, navigating the job search process as a first generation student/professional, reconciling authenticity with professionalism, etc.). Lastly, please do not hesitate to reach out if there is an idea that you have for us to bolster our commitment to providing holistic career services at UCLA Luskin.

BIPOC Students

Network/Hiring:

African American Professional Associations provides students and job seekers a list of the top 21 professional associations.

The Black Perspective provides resources, networking, jobs, and awareness to issues facing minority professionals.

Black Career Women’s Network is a career service organization designed to assist Black women find, thrive, and progress in their professional careers.

African American Hires is a job search tools and career resources for African American and Black professionals.

Corporate Minority is a professional career resource site assisting companies diversify their businesses, while providing resources  jobs search tool for minority job seekers.

Network/Hiring:

Hispanic and Latino Professional Associations provides students and job seekers a list of the top 15 professional associations.

Hispanic-Latinx Hires provides career services, job search tool, and networking events for Hispanic and LatinX job seekers.

iHispano provides career service events and a job search tool for job job seekers.

LatPro connects Hispanics and Latinx folks with employers seeking to diversify their businesses.

Networking/Hiring:

National Council of Asian Pacific Americans Provides networking resources for 38 API organizations, around the country.

Asian Career Network is a career service site that provides career events for networking, a list of companies seeking to hire API individuals, and a job search engine. 

AAPI Hires is a job board for both employers and potential employees. 

National Association of Asian American Professionals is a job search engine “connecting talent with opportunity.”

Network/Hiring:

Native American Professional Organizations Provides a list of top Native American organizations and professional associations.

National Congress of American Indians – Provides job opportunities by entities considered to be American Indian, Native Hawaiian or Alaska Native owned/operated, and also opportunities by organizations looking to hire Native American employees.

Native & Indigenous Hires Consists of career events and networking opportunities, community resources, and a job search tool.

NativeAmericanJobs.com is a career site providing resources and a job search tool. 

Nativehire Provides career resources, including employment preparation, workshops and career events, as well as a job search tool.

Network/Hiring:

Diversity Professional Associations A list of diversity professional associations in a multitude of industries.

IMDiversity.com Focuses on career and self-development for all minorities.

INSIGHT Into Diversity  Consists of resources for organizations focused on equal opportunity to find and hire diverse, qualified candidates. Provides a job board for candidates in fields, including academia, business, healthcare, and the government.

NACE Diversity Resources The National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) has a list of resources for students, and connects career services professionals to active recruiters and employers seeking to diversify their organizations.

DACA Students

There are many resources that can help Dreamers navigate transitioning from students to career professionals. Below are some helpful resources in which you can get legal advise, access funding for businesses and education, network with other DACA recipients, and find employment

Networking

DREAMer Jobs is a Facebook group featuring job opportunities for DACA recipients.

Hiring

DACA-Friendly Employers is a list of DACA friendly employers.

Immigrants Rising provides resources for Dreamers who are looking to start their own businesses. Those DACA recipients can access information regarding entrepreneurship, business plans, worker cooperatives, and financing.

MyVisaJobs database provides employment opportunities for Dreamers.

Legal Support

TheDream.US offers legal, educational resources, and more.

National Immigration Law Center (NILC) answers frequently asked questions about DACA and employment. Dreamers with questions regarding their work permits may find answers on this page.

DACA Worker’s Rights Guide provides resources for common questions regarding DACA recipients and their rights in the workplace.

Undocumented Graduate and Professional Students Handbook Please visit the UCLA undocumented graduate and professional students handbook for additional resources.

Career Readiness

Gaining Experience This site, hosted by Eastern Washington’s career center, provides information for DACA recipients and undocumented workers who want to gain work experience but aren’t legally permitted to work.

UCLA ESL Writing Program ha resources for English as a Second Language (ESL) students.

Support

Undocu-Grad School Guide A guide to pursuing, financing, and navigating graduate school as undocumented students.

My Undocumented Life Information and resources for undocumented students.

Immigrants Rising provides immigrant focused services and resources.

International Students

While at UCLA, there are various opportunities for graduate students to obtain employment on campus such teaching and research assistantships, as well as reader and tutor positions. To learn more about the types of positions, visit the Graduate Division page.  Additionally, many offices and departments offer part-time employment opportunities to students. Log-in to your Handshake account to see on-campus job postings.

If you want a Teaching Assistantship, go to the Graduate Education Website to view opportunities by department. Subscribe to the TA Positions Group to receive alerts when there are TA vacancies. As an international student, if English is not your first language, you must take and pass the Test of Oral Proficiency (TOP).

If you want to be a Teaching Assistant (TA) at UCLA, you must take and pass the Test of Oral Proficiency (TOP) before working as a TA in any department at UCLA. All non-citizens are considered international students. This includes permanent residents. However, international students who have earned a bachelor’s degree from a U.S. university are exempt from taking the TOP.

Students who plan to work as TAs must take the TOP before the quarter they plan to teach. For example, if you plan to work in the Fall, you must take and pass the exam during the summer exam dates or before. Only one exam may be taken per administration. Please consult your department for specific hiring deadlines.

The TOP is only offered once a quarter. You must register at least 24 hours prior to your desired exam time. Once you have registered for the exam, you will receive an email with detailed instructions about how to take the exam via Zoom. When the exam is held in person, it is held at 270 Powell Library (Instructional Media Lab). Please note that the exams are NOT administered at the TOP office.

Employment Authorization

F-1 Students
In general, all F-1 students are eligible for on-campus employment up to 20 hours per week during the academic year and full-time during winter and summer vacation. F-1 students can work on-campus without obtaining employment authorization from DCISS or the US Citizenship and Immigration Services. See DCISS for more detailed information.

J-1 Students
J-1 students may work on campus part time (up to 20 hours per week) during the academic year. In order to be employed, students must be in good academic standing and obtain on- campus work authorization from DCISS. This includes assistantships (TA, GSR) and fellowships.  See DCISS for more detailed information.

International students can be eligible to work part-time (up to 20 hours per week) during the academic year and full-time over winter and summer breaks.  Below is a brief summary of the employment authorization.  See the DCISS website for more detailed instructions and application process.


F-1 Students

F-1 students are eligible to obtain employment authorization for “practical training,” which is employment in their field of study.

INTERNSHIP: CPT – CURRICULAR PRACTICAL TRAINING

Curricular Practical Training, or CPT, is employment authorization before graduation, which is issued by the educational institution on the Form I-20 (a U.S. government document that verifies a student’s admission to a U.S. institution). Students pursuing unpaid internships are still required to apply for CPT. For more information regarding legal issues around unpaid internships, see NACE article.

Employment period: Up to 20 hours/week during the school year. During Summer, there are no limits to the number of hours students can work via CPT.

Employer’s Role: Provide students with a job offer letter

Student’s Role: Obtain work authorization from the UCLA Dashew Center for International Students and Scholars (DCISS). Since the authorization is approved by the educational institution, CPT is authorized according to the institution’s ability to approve that the off-campus internship is curricular, or directly related to the student’s field of study.

Cost and Processing Time: There is no cost to the employer. The processing and approval time for CPT is within 5 working days.

SHORT TERM FULL-TIME POSITIONS: OPT – OPTIONAL PRACTICAL TRAINING

F-1 students may also use OPT during the summer break but should consult with DCISS to determine if CPT or OPT is needed for their summer position.


J-1 Students

J-1 students are eligible to obtain employment authorization using “academic training” (AT) which is employment in their field of study.

Employment period: Academic training is available both before graduation (Pre-Completion AT) and after graduation (Post-Completion AT). Before graduation, AT is allowed part-time during the academic year and full-time during breaks, or if the student has advanced to candidacy. After graduation, AT is allowed either full-time or part time, but must be for a minimum of 20 hours per week. The total amount of time allowed depends on the duration of the exchange program up to 18 months. Students with Ph.D. degrees may be extended for a total of 36 months. Some J-1 students have a two-year home residency requirement that must be either waived or fulfilled before they can pursue other employment options such as H1-B or Permanent Residency.

Employer’s Role: Provide students with a job offer letter.  It is the student’s responsibility to apply for Academic Training prior to starting employment.

Student’s Role: Submit Academic Training requests before beginning employment and before the academic program completion date if applying for Post-Completion AT.  Students approved for academic training will receive an updated DS-2019 showing Academic Training Approval and an employment authorization letter. Both the letter and DS-2019 will show the duration of your academic training approval based on your application and job offer letter.

Cost and Processing Time: There is no cost to the employer. DCISS processes the student’s Academic Training documentation within 10-14 working days.

If you are graduating in June and want to work in the U.S. after graduating, please review the information found on the Dashew Center for International Students & Scholars website and be aware of the deadlines.

F-1 Students

SHORT TERM FULL-TIME POSITIONS: OPT – OPTIONAL PRACTICAL TRAINING

Optional Practical Training, or OPT, is employment authorization generally after graduation which is issued by the United States Citizenship & Immigration Services (USCIS) on an Employment Authorization Document (EAD card).

Employment period: After degree completion, up to 12 months of full-time or part-time

Employer’s Role: For the first 12 months of initial OPT, the employer does not have any paperwork responsibilities beyond hiring the employee.  It is the student’s responsibility to apply for OPT, which can be granted with or without an offer of employment.

Student’s Role: Follow OPT guidelines and application process as outlined by UCLA Dashew Center for International Students and Scholars.

Cost and Processing Time: There is no cost to the employer. DCISS requires 5 business days to process the student’s OPT documentation for submission to USCIS. The USCIS processing time for OPT takes an average of 90 days. It is highly recommended that students submit their OPT application to DCISS at least 3 months before their requested OPT start date. The new employee must have the EAD card in hand to start work and the start date of OPT (as indicated on the EAD) must have been reached.

LONG TERM FULL-TIME POSITIONS: H-1B VISA

Employers can continue employing international graduates beyond the 12-month OPT period by filing a Petition for a Nonimmigrant (temporary) Worker on behalf of the employee, the most common category being the H-1B visa.  Other visa options can be found at the USCIS website.

Employment period: H-1B petitions may be initially approved for three years but can be renewed for a total of six years.

Employer’s Role: The employer is responsible for filing the H-1B petition on behalf of the international employee. Many companies find that retaining an experienced immigration attorney is helpful to facilitate the process. Dashew can refer interested employers to law firms that have worked success-fully with our staff and faculty in the past.

Cost and Processing Time: Inclusive of the attorney fee and USCIS application fees, the total cost to apply for an H-1B visa is between $5,000-$7,000. The earliest date for filing a cap-subject H-1B petition is April 1. As there is high demand for H-1B visas, it is strongly recommended that applications arrive at USCIS on April 1. Approved H-1B visas become effective October 1.  The process for cap-exempt H-1B visas is slightly different.

Cap-Exempt H-1B: Only 65,000 H-1B visas are given out for candidates who have completed undergraduate degrees, and an additional 20,000 are available for those who have completed graduate degrees in the U.S. An exemption to the cap is available to U.S. employers that fall into one of the three exemption categories including:

  • Higher education institution
  • Non-profit organization associated with a higher education institution
  • Non-profit research or government research organization

Additional information can be found here.


J-1 Students

J-1 students are eligible to obtain employment authorization using “academic training” (AT) which is employment in their field of study.

Employment period: Academic training is available both before graduation (Pre-Completion AT) and after graduation (Post-Completion AT). Before graduation, AT is allowed part-time during the academic year and full-time during breaks, or if the student has advanced to candidacy. After graduation, AT is allowed either full-time or part time, but must be for a minimum of 20 hours per week. The total amount of time allowed depends on the duration of the exchange program up to 18 months. Students with Ph.D. degrees may be extended for a total of 36 months. Some J-1 students have a two-year home residency requirement that must be either waived or fulfilled before they can pursue other employment options such as H-1B or Permanent Residency.

Employer’s Role: Provide students with a job offer letter.  It is the student’s responsibility to apply for Academic Training prior to starting employment.

Student’s Role: Submit Academic Training requests before beginning employment and before the academic program completion date if applying for Post-Completion AT.  Students approved for academic training will receive an updated DS-2019 showing Academic Training Approval and an employment authorization letter. Both the letter and DS-2019 will show the duration of your academic training approval based on your application and job offer letter.

Cost and Processing Time: There is no cost to the employer. Dashew processes the student’s Academic Training documentation within 10-14 working days.

Utilize resources and networks to broaden potential employment opportunities.

Work Authorization and Visa Resources

  • Going Global is an online database with domestic and international job listings, job search resources, and more. View the H-1B section for a list employers that have sponsored visas by each state and major metro areas. Access through Handshake.
  • MyVisaJobs.com allows you to learn which employers have utilized H-1B visas for a three-year period and also provides other excellent resources
  • USCIS H-1B Cap will allow you to monitor the number of available H-1B visas and provides helpful information.
  • RedBus2US.com provides information and experiences for international students and professionals looking to study, work and live in the US.
  • VisaDoor is a central visa database of employment based green cards, H-1B visa, student visa, immigration attorneys, etc.

Job Search

  • Use Handshake and other job search tools to find job opportunities
  • Vault.com: provides in-depth information on specific industries, company, or profession.  Access through Handshake.
  • GoinGlobal: provides information on companies sponsoring H-1B visas, work permit & visa requirements, and job/internship postings.  Access through Handshake.
  • Glassdoor: Search job listings, anonymous salary details for any job or company.
  • Company Directories
    The University of California system and UCLA has licensing to access a variety of business databases to help students research companies for academic use. The following are ones that may be useful for students to learn more about specific organizations.

    • AtoZ databases: Target Company Lists
      Creates custom lists from more than 30 million US business profiles filtered by geography, industry, public/private ownership, employee size, annual revenue, and more. The database also includes more than 2.3 million job listings, 1.1 million healthcare professionals, 2 million new businesses, and much more. Users must be connected to UCLA VPN in order to access the database for free.
    • Uniworld Online
      Information on multinational firms operating around the world. The database may be searched by country, state, keyword, zipcode or postal code, industry code, revenue, and the number of employees. Users must be connected to UCLA VPN in order to access the database for free.
  • Lockin Job: Online platform to learn about companies and jobs in China.

Interviewing Strategies

During the interview, you will be expected to verbally communicate your interest in the position. For advice and resources for interviewing, please review the Interviewing Section for more information. Also, consider the following tips:

  • Don’t apologize for your accent. Work to improve your English skills if you are a non-native speaker but practice your interviewing skills to build your confidence.
  • Emphasize positive aspects of your international background. Certain employers are seeking to expand to global markets. Your international background may be an asset to these employers.
  • Practice, record and get feedback using InterviewStream (access through Handshake) or through mock interviews with a career counselor.

Additional Resources

Dashew Center for International Students & Scholars (DCISS) website has a lot of information that will be helpful for you. Read the information on Programs & EventsResources, and F-1 Students. If you want to start working on your internship hours, go to the Employment tab on the Currently Enrolled section of the DCISS website to read more about CPT and the forms you will need to complete.

Dashew has in-person lobby hours for general inquiries Monday – Friday 9:00 am – 12:00 pm and 1:00 – 4:00 pm. There are also virtual drop-in office hours Monday – Friday from 1:30 pm -4:00 pm (PST).

LGBTQIA+ Students

Networking:

HRC Student & Professional Associations A listing of LGBTQIA professional and student associations, broken down by industry.

Out Professionals – Largest LGBT networking organization “dedicated to advancing the careers of LGBTQ professionals by creating meaningful networking events and other career-building and life-enriching programming.”

Out & Equal – an LGBT workplace advocacy group designed to connect the LGBT community through resources, events, and support groups.

Hiring:

LGBTConnect job board for anyone seeking LGBT-friendly employers.

 Corporate Equality Index  connects jobseekers with LGBT- friendly companies.

The Capital Area Gay & Lesbian Chamber of Commerce – Identifies LGBT-friendly companies in the District of Columbia.

HRC Laws & Legislation Resources on employment rights and quality of workplace for LGBTQ+ professionals. 

Lamb da Legal- Workplace Discrimination A step-by-step guide for what to do if you experience discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity. 

Transgender Law Center Resource center for information on trans rights in the workplace, how to file a discrimination complaint with local, state, and federal agencies. 

Out At Work- Know Your Rights Resource center for legal knowledge of LGBT employment/workplace rights. 

LA LGBT Center TEEP Career development resources, legal assistance, and economic support for gender-diverse people.

Navigating Gender Identity and Expression During a Job Search An article offering insight into gender identity expression while looking for employment. 

Coming Out at Work A non-comprehensive guide to coming out in the workplace.

National Center for Transgender Equality A resource center for transgender employees. 

Transitioning at Work A checklist for preparing to transition in the workplace. 

Your Journey: A Career Guide for Trans and Nonbinary Students An interactive career guide for trans and nonbinary students. 

Introductions on Pronouns Resources on using pronouns.

PhD Students

In addition to working with your faculty advisor as you prepare for the academic job search market, below are some additional resources to help you.

Career Planning

A Guide to Academia: Getting into and Surviving Grad School, Postdocs, and a Research Job by Prosanta Chakrabarty (free access through UCLA VPN)

ImaginePhD is a free online career exploration and planning tool for PhD students and postdoctoral scholars in the humanities and social sciences.

The Professor is In: The Essential Guide to Turning your Ph.D. Into a Job by Karen Kelsky

UCLA Graduate Student Career Preparation Toolkit


Job Search

Academic Job Search is a list of job resources compiled by the UCLA Career Center.

Academic Job Search Process by Andrew Green, UC Berkeley


Interviews

Explore Your Options

ImaginePhD ins an online resource for graduate students in the humanities and social sciences.

The Versatile Phd is an online resource for graduate students in all field.


Conduct Your Search

HASTAC (“haystack”) is a network of humanists, artists, social scientists and engineers committed to new forms of collaboration across disciplines.

My Next Move is a free resource from the US Department of Labor.

Non-Academic Career Options for Humanities and Social Sciences (compiled by Columbia University Career Education)


Prepare Your Application Material

UCLA Graduate Student Career Guide


Articles and Books

Before Your Write a Cover Letter for a Nonfaculty Job, Try this Exercise by Erin Bartram (The Chronicle of Higher Education)

The Ph.D.’s Guide to a Nonfaculty Job Search by L. Maren Wood (The Chronicle of Higher Education)

“So What Are You Going to Do with That?”: Finding Careers Outside Academia by Susan Basalla and Maggie Debelius

The following list contains just a few organizations that offer internships for doctoral students. Additionally, many organizations offer internship programs. Visit the websites of organizations that interest you for internship and summer opportunities.

Internship Opportunities

Asian Development Bank

J.P. Morgan Summer Internships

RAND Graduate Student Summer Association Program

United Nations University PhD Internships

World Bank

Internship Listing Sites (compiled by UCB)


Fellowship and Postdoc Databases and Resources

ProFellow

UCLA GRAPES

Inside Higher Ed

Academic Jobs Wiki

Postdoctoral Fellowships in the Social Sciences (compiled by UCB)

Pregnant & Parenting Students

How To Search for a Job While Pregnant Guide for Job Search while expecting.

How to Job Search While You’re Pregnant Guide for Job Search while expecting.

How to Get a Job While Pregnant Guide and tips for Job Search and hiring process while pregnant.

FamilyEquality Provides family support, family building, and advocacy resources for LGBTQ+ families.

TheMomProject Has a job board to connect expecting parents with employers “who employers moms.”

The Pregnancy Discrimination Act of 1978 The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, the pregnancy discrimination act.

Family and Medical Leave (FMLA) The US department of Labor Family and Medical Leave Act.

Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) Guidelines Guide for Family and Medical Leave.

Facts About Pregnancy Discrimination The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission facts.

Paid Family Leave Resources National Conference of State Legislatures, paid family leave resources.

Students with Disabilities

People with disabilities continue to face barriers finding employment at higher rates than there able-bodied counterpart. This section provides links to services and resources to help close the gap.

Networking:

Lime Connect “represents the largest network of high-potential university students and professionals – including veterans – who have disabilities in the world.”

Disability Equality Index Provides networking for disability inclusion efforts.

Hiring:

DisabledPerson is a job board with more than 300,000 jobs available for searching and posted directly by employers.

Creative Spirit is a job search tool and assistance for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDDs).

Integrate Advisors is a job search tool and resources for autistic adults.

Ability Links Job search tool for job seekers with disabilities and inclusive employers.

“The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) prohibits discrimination against people with disabilities and guarantees equal opportunities for individuals with disabilities in employment, transportation, public accommodations, state and local government services, and telecommunications.”

Youth, Disclosure, and the Workplace Why, When, What, and How Provides policy and legal guidance around disclosing disability. 

Job Accomodation Network “provides free consulting services for all employees, regardless of the medical condition. Services include one-on-one consultation about all aspects of job accommodations, including the accommodation process, accommodation ideas, product vendors, referral to other resources, and ADA compliance assistance.”

American Association of People with Disabilities is a resource center for adults with disabilities that offers legal resources, job search tool, and networks.

Career Readiness/Support:

Georgetown University Resources provides career resources for disabled individuals.

Viscardi Center provides job readiness and education for adults with disabilities.

California Department of Rehabilitation has job resources for individuals with disabilities.

Students with Low Socioeconomic Status

Job Opportunities for Low-Income Individuals is a job search tool and provides links to resources for federal government grants and loans.

LA Promise Zone Resources Provides employment and housing assistance as well as networking events and other resources.

Low Income Workers Climbing Career Ladder article with list of programs helping low-income workers “climb the career ladder.”

Dress for Success provides professional clothing for those identifying as women.

Career Closet at UCLA Provides professional clothing for all UCLA students.

Students With Mental Health Concerns

Resources for Mental Health:

UCLA RISE Center offers “a variety of practices and curated resources to support your holistic success, mental health and well-being.” 

Career Readiness/Support:

Meaningful Work and Recovery Provides networking, peer support, advocacy, and other resources for those in need.

Work and Wellbeing A Job Guide for People with Mental Health Conditions.

A Practical Guide for People with Mental Health Conditions Who Want to Work.

Women-Identified Students

Networking:

Wonder Women Tech Provides access to career development, mentorship, job opportunities, and networking for Women, BIPOC, and the Underrepresented in Science, Technology, Engineering, the Arts, Math (STEAM) and Innovation.

Hiring

Career and Job Resources for Women Job-Seekers Career and job resources for women.

Women’s Job List Job search tool for women.

Feminist Jobs Job opportunities at leading feminist and progressive organizations.

Career Readiness:

The Best Strategies for Women to Negotiate a Higher Salary Woman’s guide and resources for salary negotiation.

Fellowships & Internship Funding

UCLA Luskin offers a limited number of prestigious and competitive yearlong fellowships with nonprofit organizations, government and public service agencies. Currently enrolled first-year Public Policy, Social Welfare, and Urban Planning graduate students are eligible to apply for awards. The fellowships are full-time during the summer and part-time (12-20 hours/week) during the 9-month academic year (fall through spring).  Applications typically open in late winter/early spring.

Bohnett Fellows, Bohnett Staff, and University Staff
at the 2022 United States Conference of Mayors in Washington D.C.

Below are the awards that are available for the 2022-23 school year. Applications for the 2023-2024 academic year will open in January 2023.

David Bohnett Fellowship in the City of Los Angeles Mayor’s Office

DEADLINE FOR 2022-2023 Bohnett Fellowship has passed. The application for 2023-2024 will reopen in Winter 2023. 

  • Award amount:  $38,500
  • Number of awards: 3 awards annually

The David Bohnett Fellowship was established in 2007 for outstanding Luskin graduate students to complete a yearlong fellowship in the Los Angeles Mayor’s Office. The Mayor’s Office provides students with access to high levels of city government in where they are supervised by the Mayor’s senior staff. The Fellows are matched to an office that coincides with the Fellows’ expertise and the needs of the Mayor’s Office. The assignments are fast-paced, rigorous, and may expand or change based on the evolving needs of the City. As such, the Bohnett Fellowship requires graduate students to have a high amount of professionalism, flexibility, and innovation. Past offices that hosted Fellows include: Budget & Innovation, City Services, Economic Opportunity, Homelessness Initiatives, Immigrant Affairs, Reentry, and Transportation. In addition to the academic  yearlong Fellowship, Fellows also receive the opportunity to attend the annual U.S. Conference of Mayors (USCM) winter meeting, typically held in Washington D.C.. At USCM, Fellows have access to city leaders from across the nation, and with the staff and Fellows from the other universities that also host the Bohnett Fellows program (NYU Wagner & U Michigan Ford). Further, Fellows join the many UCLA Luskin Cohorts that have participated in the Bohnett Fellowship Program. UCLA Luskin and the Bohnett Foundation regularly organize  events to encourage cross-cohort and sector networking. For more information about the current and former Bohnett Fellows from UCLA Luskin please visit: http://www.bohnettfoundation.org/ucla-luskin/.

Application Process

  1. Please submit your application in Luskin CareerHub by the deadline.
  2. Your application will include a resume and two-page cover letter. Address cover letter to: “Dear Selection Committee”
  3. Luskin selection committee will select nine finalists to interview with the Mayor’s Office and the Bohnett Foundation.
  4. The finalists will be required to submit a writing sample.
  5. Luskin will provide an offer to the selected Fellows in Winter Quarter.

The David Bohnett Foundation

This Fellowship is generously funded by the David Bohnett Foundation. David Bohnett is a philanthropist and technology entrepreneur. The mission of the David Bohnett Foundation is to improve society through social activism.

Luskin Leadership Fellowship at the Office of Child Protection, Los Angeles County

DEADLINE TO APPLY: Friday, March 4, 2022 at 5 pm PT. The application for 2023-2024 will reopen in Winter 2023. 

Award amount: $35,000

Number of awards: 1 annually

UCLA Luskin Leadership Fellowship is a high-level apprenticeship program for exceptional public policy, social welfare and urban planning graduate students that serve within selected government agencies and nonprofit and civic organizations to work on research, policy, advocacy and applied projects tailored to the students’ tracks of study and consistent with the mission and goals of the organization. For 2022-2023, the host organization will be the Los Angeles County, Office of Child Protection. The Fellow will completes 10 weeks of full-time (40 hours/week) over summer and 20 hours/week during the academic year and will receive $35,000. Link to full Fellowship Description.The application link is here.

Application Process

  1. Please submit your application in Luskin CareerHub by March 4 at 5pm
  2. Your application will include a two-page cover letter and your resume. Address cover letter to: “Dear Selection Committee”
  3. Luskin selection committee will select three finalists to interview with the Office of Child Protection.
  4. The Office of Child Protection will select one Luskin student.

The Anthony & Jeanne Pritzker Family Foundation

The Luskin Fellowship at the Office of Child Protection is generously funded by the Anthony & Jeanne Pritzker Family Foundation. The Foundation aims to enrich their community with a particular focus on health, higher education, the environment, and the arts. In 2014, the Foundation launched the Pritzker Foster Care Initiative to highlight its commitment to supporting transition age foster youth and the families that care for them.

iACT

DEADLINE TO APPLY: March 25, 2022. The deadline has passed. This award is specific to 2022-2023, it may be offered in 2023-2024, contingent on funding and various factors.

Award amount:  $35,000

Number of awards: 1

How to apply: CareerHub

Who We Are: 
iACT is a team of influential changemakers–refugees and non-refugees alike–with diverse backgrounds and
expertise who dream big and transform obstacles into opportunities. Our U.S.-based paid staff is small,
agile, creative, driven, and hopeful. iACT has a large, global volunteer team that significantly contributes to
programs, projects, campaigns, and events. iACT’s U.S.-based paid staff team’s role is to support a new
culture of participation that unites global volunteers to accompany communities impacted by and displaced
by violence. We are here to support the almost 200 refugee and displaced staff members abroad who in turn
lead the programs in their communities. iACT’s U.S.-based paid staff is a small team with the expectation
that everyone is willing to step in and contribute in any area as needed.

Role of the Fellow:
• Amplify and connect the voices of Refugees with the broader community.
• Provide essential support to staff members in order to ensure that iACT’s programs run smoothly
and efficiently.
• Execute details of projects and programs so that the team can achieve established goals and vision.
• Provide key support to all iACT team members, paid and volunteer, including short and long-term
projects, partnerships, campaigns, and programs.
• Develop and maintain positive working relationships with team members, partners, and other
stakeholders—during and after project completion.
• We are flexible in working with the fellow’s passions to develop and collaborate on projects they
may specifically be interested in.

Location: Flexible remote and in-person hybrid working environment with an office in Hermosa Beach, CA,
USA.

Application Process

  1. Please submit your application to associated job posting in Luskin CareerHub by April 8.
  2. Your application will include a two-page cover letter and resume. Address cover letter to: “Dear Selection Committee”
  3. UCLA Luskin will advance three students to interview with iACT.
  4. iACT will select one Luskin student.

Ralph M Parsons Foundation

The Luskin Fellowship at iACT is generously funded by the Ralph M parsons Foundation. The foundation improves the well-being of the residents of Los Angeles County through responsive grantmaking in human services, civic and cultural, education, and health.

Important Note for all fellowships:

In some cases, final award amounts may be adjusted for indirect costs and/or taxes. Awards requested at the $35,000 level may be adjusted to approximately $33,000. Awards may also impact students’ financial aid packages. In all cases, students will be notified of final award amount and are strongly encouraged to discuss possible financial aid impact with UCLA Financial Aid Office.

Questions? Email Kevin Medina at kmedina@luskin.ucla.edu

Important Notes:

1. Fellowships and internship funding opportunities vary annually based on available funding.

2. In some cases, final award amounts may be adjusted for indirect costs and/or taxes. The final amount for a $7,500 may be approximately $7,050. Awards may also impact students’ financial aid packages. In all cases, students will be notified of final award amount and are strongly encouraged to discuss possible financial aid impact with UCLA Financial Aid Office.

2022 Summer Internship Funding

Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Internship Award

Award amount:  $7,500

Number of awards: 2

How to apply: CareerHub (opens May 2, 2022)

Application due: May 9, 2022 at 5pm PT

This award was created to provide financial support to students from underrepresented backgrounds. The goal is to:

  • providing funding to a student for an unpaid internship centering equity, diversity, and inclusion
  • help diversify the fields of Public Policy, Social Welfare, and Urban Planning

To apply, write a one-page description of the internship and how it was secured, along with a one-page statement of interest that describes how the internship addresses equity, diversity, and inclusion. Include your name and Luskin department at the top of each page. Add your resume. To submit your application and resume, apply to the posting in CareerHub.

**if you applied to the public service internship award, your packet is already under consideration**

Michael S. Dukakis Internship Award

Award amount:  $6,000

Number of awards: 1 annually

How to apply: CareerHub (opens March 28 2022)

Application due: April 8, 2022 at 5pm PT

Professor Michael Dukakis spearheaded this privately funded internship program to provide UCLA Luskin masters’ students with first-hand public service experience in government. As power shifts from Washington, DC to the state and local level, the need for talented public servants has never been greater. The Michael S. Dukakis Internship Program provides stipends for UCLA Luskin masters’ students serving in non-partisan internships in government with a special emphasis on California. The focus for this 10-week (40 hours/week) summer internship is on government settings rather than non-profits or NGOs.

Students who have secured a government internship meeting the criteria above may apply. The internship must be in a policy-related, public service function in a non-partisan government setting. Working for an elected partisan official would not qualify. Non-partisan city council or county board of supervisors qualify, but senate, assembly, or congress do not, nor would working for a non-profit or NGO. The internship site would ideally be in local or state government in California. If the internship is in Washington, D.C. with a Federal agency, the focus of the internship must be on California. The internship is limited to UCLA Luskin graduate students pursuing the MPP, MSW or MURP.  Ph.D. students are not eligible.

To apply, write a one-page description of the internship and how it was secured, along with a one-page statement of interest that describes how the internship fits into your long-term career aspirations in public service.  Include your name and department at the top of each document.  To submit your description, statement of interest, and resume, apply to the posting in CareerHub.

Michael Dukakis Fund

Professor Michael Dukakis generously provided funding to provide UCLA Luskin students with e first-hand public service experience in government with a specific focus on California.

Yaroslavsky Internship Award

Award amount: $6,000.

Number of awards: 3 annually

How to apply: CareerHub

Application due: April 8, 2022 at 5pm PT

The Yaroslavsky Fellowship seeks to support graduate students at the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs with focusing on health or public health policy as it relates to Public Affairs. For 2022, this fellowship provides funding for health-related unpaid summer internships.

Please complete the attached application for award consideration consists of this form along with the attachments indicated below. The application asks for you to share your interest and passion for health, public health or health policy, share any experiences in health, public health, or health policy and note any particular communities served, and list your internship plans in health, public health or health policy.

Ideally, an internship will already be secured when you apply, but applications may be considered for those that are still in process of securing their health-related experience.

The Barbara Yaroslavsky Memorial Fund

The Barbara Yaroslavsky Memorial Fund was established to honor the lasting legacy of Barbara Yaroslavsky’s advocacy for and commitment to quality health care for everyone in our society.

Public Service Internship Award

Award amount: $5,000.

Number of awards: 1

How to apply: CareerHub

Application due: April 8, 2022 at 5pm PT

UCLA Luskin will provide one or two 2022 summer internship awards to a UCLA Luskin graduate student who will be accepting non-paid internships with organizations that are engaged in public service. The internship organization must be bi-partisan/non-partisan and can be a civic organization, non-partisan government agency or department, a community program or nonprofit organization, advocacy group or civic engagement. Internship will be ten weeks between June and September (400 hours).

To apply, write a one-page description of the internship and how it was secured, along with a one-page statement of interest that describes how the internship fits into your long-term career aspirations in public service. Include your name and Luskin department at the top of each page. Add your resume. To submit your application and resume, apply to the posting in CareerHub.

Summer Fellowships

Climate Resolve

Award amount:$6,000.

Number of awards: 1

How to apply: CareerHub (opens March 27 2022)

Application due: June 6, 2022 at 5pm PT

Description:

Climate Resolve UCLA Luskin Summer Intern Description.05.26.22

Application Process

To apply, submit your cover letter and resume.

This application process also includes an interview (via Zoom). Please hold 6/9 9am-10am & 4-5pm for interviews.

One $6,00 award will be made for each internship. Important Note:  In some cases, final award amounts may be adjusted for indirect costs and/or taxes.  Awards may also impact students’ financial aid packages.  In all cases, students will be notified of final award amount and are strongly encouraged to discuss possible financial aid impact with UCLA Financial Aid Office.

Liberty Hill Foundation

Award amount:$7,500.

Number of awards: 5

How to apply: CareerHub (opens March 25 2022)

Application due: April 8, 2022

Liberty Hill is a non-profit organization that advances social change through a strategic combination of grants, leadership training and campaigns. Liberty Hill is first to identify community leaders at the frontlines of change. They invest in changemakers and equip them with the skills and relationships they need to build power and advance social justice. With a near 40-year track record, Liberty Hill is uniquely positioned to bring together forces for change and forge a common agenda for equality and opportunity in Los Angeles.

Internship Positions Available

Liberty Hill is hiring Luskin interns to focus on one of the following areas: environmental justice, capacity building, public-private partnerships, housing justice, and youth justice.

To apply: One to two page cover letter and resume. Apply via CareerHub. A writing sample may be required if you are invited for an interview.

United States Conference of Mayors Intern (offered every three years)

 Award amount: $10,000

Number of awards: 1

How to apply: CareerHub (will open March 25, 2022)

Application due: April 8, 2022

The David Bohnett Foundation sponsors a graduate student to intern with the U.S. Conference of Mayors. The United States Conference of Mayors (USCM) is the official nonpartisan organization of cities with populations of 30,000 or more. There are over 1,400 such cities in the country today. Its chief elected official, the mayor, represents each city in the Conference.  The US Conference of Mayors is seeking applications from graduate students at the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs to be its 2022 Bohnett Foundation intern. The Bohnett Foundation annually supports a graduate student in urban public policy at the US Conference of Mayors.

The specific duties of the intern will be determined by 1) the intern’s interest in key urban policy issues (housing, environment, transportation, infrastructure, education, technology, public safety, livability, etc); and 2) the needs of the Conference during the summer months. Due to the ever-changing nature of mayors and their cities, issues often arise suddenly, so flexibility is required by our interns. The student will begin his/her work at the conclusion of UCLA’s academic year and run for a 10-week period.  The Bohnett Foundation intern will have the opportunity, at no cost, to attend the Conference’s 90th Annual Meeting in Reno, June 3-6,2022, where over 300 mayors will gather to discuss and debate national urban policy issues.  The intern will primarily be remote but may have the opportunity to work out of the USCM’s offices located in downtown Washington.

This opportunity is offered at UCLA Luskin every three years; other years, The Bohnett Foundation offers this opportunity through New York University or University of Michigan.

The David Bohnett Foundation

This Fellowship is generously funded by the David Bohnett Foundation. David Bohnett is a philanthropist and technology entrepreneur. The mission of the David Bohnett Foundation is to improve society through social activism.

TreePeople

Award amount:$7,500.

Number of awards: 1

How to apply: CareerHub (opens March 25 2022)

Application due: April 8, 2022

  • Draft and edit talking points related to extreme heat, drought, and other climate risks for interviews, TreePeople projects, and related meetings.
  • Research case study examples and literature review for climate change and resilience-related topics
  • Assist with any upcoming workshops and symposium as needed
  • Attend weekly departmental meetings with the Policy and Research Team as well as weekly check ins with the Policy and Research Associate
  • Attend public hearings and provide public comments representing TreePeople

Ralph M Parsons Foundation

The Luskin Fellowship at Freedom for Immigrants is generously funded by the Ralph M parsons Foundation. The foundation improves the well-being of the residents of Los Angeles County through responsive grantmaking in human services, civic and cultural, education, and health.

Freedom For Immigrants

Award amount $7,500.

Number of awards: 1

How to apply: CareerHub (opens March 25)

Application due: April 1, 2022

Freedom for Immigrants is devoted to abolishing immigration detention, while ending the isolation of people currently suffering in this profit-driven system. Since 2012, we have been monitoring conditions inside immigration detention facilities. Our network of 4,500 volunteers visits immigrants in ICE detention centers throughout the country, breaking their isolation and advocating for those in detention. Freedom for Immigrants also operates a national hotline, which people in detention can use free of charge to report abuses or request support. In the policy arena, we work alongside local and national partners to support federal and state-level policies that call on the government to divest from immigration detention and instead invest in systems of care that strengthen immigrant communities. Our community-based programming offers an alternative to detention by welcoming immigrants into the social fabric of the United States as part of the vision for how we build a world without detention.

This fellowship is fully remote and offers students the opportunity to work at a national immigrant rights nonprofit working to abolish immigration detention. The position may include monitoring detention conditions, working on issues of e-carceration post release, or working with our policy team to advocate for state and federal policy change.

Ralph M Parsons Foundation

The Luskin Fellowship at Freedom for Immigrants is generously funded by the Ralph M parsons Foundation. The foundation improves the well-being of the residents of Los Angeles County through responsive grantmaking in human services, civic and cultural, education, and health.

Luskin Center for Innovation

The Luskin Center for Innovation hires several graduate student researchers to conduct environmental policy research, support community organizations, and further their professional development. Interested students should visit their team page and contact the team member(s) most aligned with your interests about employment openings. They also offer Research Fellowships, Field Fellowships for Environmental Justice, and Graduate Research Grants

The Ralph and Goldy Lewis Center for Regional Policy Studies

The Lewis Center supports Luskin graduate students for capstone projects on topics that advance the center’s interests on the quality of life for residents in the Los Angeles region, with a focus on how people live, move, and work. Graduate student fellows are selected through a merit-based process during the year they intend to complete a capstone project. All projects must be geographically focused in the LA region and relate to one of the Lewis Center’s primary areas of interest: housing affordability, transportation equity, or jobs and the regional economy.

Luskin Institute on Inequality and Democracy

The Luskin Institute on Inequality and Democracy supports UCLA scholars who undertake collective work related to at least one of the Institute’s research themes. Products should demonstrate an explicit public orientation, i.e. an intent of speaking to public issues and/or addressing audiences that lie beyond the university. The Institute is especially interested in projects that organize knowledge to challenge inequality, be it by questioning established academic wisdom, contributing to public debate, or impacting policy decisions.

Latino Policy and Politics Initiative

The Latino Policy & Politics Initiative (LPPI) addresses the most critical domestic policy challenges facing Latinos and other communities of color through research, advocacy, mobilization and leadership development to propel policy reforms that expand genuine opportunity for all Americans. LPPI fellows are equipped with technical skills and hands-on experiences critical to being transformational elected officials, organizational leaders and community allies of today and tomorrow.

Institute of Transportation Studies

The Institute of Transportation Studies supports and advances cutting-edge research, the highest-quality education, and meaningful and influential civic engagement on the many pressing transportation issues facing our cities, state, nation and world today. Master of Urban and Regional planning students complete one of the following in their second year prior to graduation:

  • Applied Planning Research Project (Client Project): The Client Project is applied planning research on a real-world problem conducted by MURP students in their 2nd year in order to satisfy the capstone requirement for the degree.  See features on the top 2021 projects and four c/o 2020 students and their projects.
  • Community Scholars or Comprehensive Project: Community Scholars & the Comprehensive Projects are similar, in many respects, to the client project, but larger in scope and scale. These projects simulate real world planning practice in that they incorporate students from various areas of concentration working together to research a problem from multiple planning angles.
  • Masters’ Theses: The thesis focuses on posing and answering a research question in planning that has not previously been answered. Research is conducted by a MURP student in conjunction with a faculty committee.

Center for Neighborhood Knowledge (CNK)

The Center for Neighborhood Knowledge is dedicated to translating its research to inform actionable neighborhood-related policies and programs that contribute to positive social change. We specialize in empirical spatial analysis and emphasizes the study of diversity, differences, and disparities among neighborhoods, and explicitly cover immigrant enclaves, low-income neighborhoods and minority communities.

Latin American Cities Initiative

The mission of the Latin American Cities Initiative is to develop and deepen knowledge networks among students, educators and professionals in the arena of urban planning and policy in South, Central and North America. The Latin American Cities Initiative will provide funding for student capstone research on planning and urban policy in Latin America, as well as support in identifying clients and topics, beginning in 2019. If you are interested in applying, please contact ciudades@luskin.ucla.edu. The Latin American Cities Initiative will assist students at UCLA Luskin to find an internship in a planning or policy field in Latin America, in collaboration with Luskin Global Public Affairs.

The Global Lab for Research in Action

The Global Lab for Research in Action pursues evidence-based solutions to critical health, education and economic challenges faced by children, adolescents and women around the world. We conduct research that informs people, programs and policy to make a tangible impact on the lives of some of the world’s most vulnerable individuals. 

The UCLA Hub for Health Intervention, Policy and Practice

The Hub for Health Intervention, Policy and Practice connects the academy, community and policymakers to address health disparities among diverse communities in Los Angeles and beyond. The Hub engages community members in impactful, theory-driven and sustainable research that informs high-level policy and street-level social justice health outcomes. HHIPP’s work situates health policy within a social welfare and social justice framework.

The Gay Sexuality and Social Policy Initiative

The Gay Sexuality and Social Policy Initiative will conduct cutting edge research that centers gay male sexuality and gay men’s unique experiences related to sex. Investment in GSSPI will be an investment in the lives of gay men and will increase the effectiveness of ongoing efforts to improve quality of life for gay men around the world.

Berggruen Governance Index

The Berggruen Fellowship Program is a cornerstone of the Institute’s mission to nurture ideas that shape the future. It offers scholars the opportunity of flexible periods to live and work in both the United States and China. Berggruen Fellows produce books, scholarly workshops, deliver lectures, colloquia, and academic articles to disseminate the ideas cultivated throughout their fellowship. The themes of the fellowship range from global and technological development to philosophical and cultural change, with the focus varying within each program area.

Global Perspectives

Global Perspectives is an online-only, peer-reviewed, transdisciplinary journal seeking to advance social science research and debates in a globalizing world, specifically in terms of concepts, theories, methodologies, and evidence bases.

California Policy Lab

The California Policy Lab is a non-partisan research institute. Their mission is to improve the lives of Californians by generating evidence that transforms public policy. Their work is focused in six policy areas: education, criminal justice reform, poverty and the social safety net, labor and employment, health, and homelessness and high needs populations.

Center for Policy Research on Aging

Center for Policy Research on Aging studies the major policy issues affecting our aging society including Social Security, Medicare, long-term care and the societal implications that accompany the aging of the baby boom generation and its parents. CPRA conducts research, fosters  multidisciplinary collaboration among UCLA faculty,  and works closely with policy makers,  service  providers and community groups in meeting the challenges of an aging society.

The International Practice Pathway (IPP) of Global Public Affairs at Luskin provides financial support for first year students seeking summer placements in low and middle-income countries. GPA can assist students with information on potential summer internship placements, including contact information of summer employers, as well as second-year students and Luskin graduates who completed summer internships.

Summer internships are serious professional undertakings involving recognized international organizations. Professionalism, responsibility, and respect are required of all students participating in the program. Click here for more information on IPP Summer Fellowships.

Working at UCLA

Graduate programs at UCLA offer employment opportunities to graduate students including teaching and research assistantships.  Additional work resources are available here, such as special readers, departmental scholars, postdocs, and internships.

University-Wide scholarships, grants, and fellowships

Scholarship & Fellowship Search Engine

Search the GRAPES (Graduate & Postdoctoral Education Support) database for awards from among 625 scholarships, grants, fellowships, and postdoctoral awards.

Randall Lewis Health & Policy Fellowship

The purpose of the Randall Lewis Health & Policy Fellowship program is to ensure the development of public health and health administration, health policy, urban planning, and data professionals who possess the necessary skills to influence positive change in public policy, systems, and the built environment in our local communities. The Randall Lewis Health & Policy Fellowship is a prestigious and competitive fellowship for master and doctoral level students interested in health policy and related disciplines. Each fellow is matched according to skill sets needed by the hosting city, agency or business and the fellow’s interests and training. They accept applications from MPP, MSW, MURP and doctoral students. The fellowship is an 8-month (400 hour) commitment beginning in September through May. Applications will be accepted f until July 15, 2022.If you have questions or need an extension to apply through July 30, please inquire at jaynieboren@HC2strategies.com. A $6,500 stipend is paid to the fellows upon completion of hours, projects, and final deliverables.

The Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) Program is a federal program created for those in public service jobs, offering the opportunity to have their federal loan balances forgiven after 120 qualifying monthly payments. 

The 2023-2023 Luskin Yearlong & Summer Fellowship recipients can be found here.

The 2021-22 Bohnett Fellows report (including past Bohnett Fellows employment and current Bohnett Fellows work products/examples) can be accessed here.