James Lubben

James Lubben is Professor Emeritus at UCLA where he taught for 20 years and was Associate Dean and Department Chair. He is also Professor Emeritus at Boston College where he was the Louise McMahon Ahearn Endowed Professor in Social Work for 15 years. During his 35 years in the academy, Dr. Lubben mentored over 200 doctoral students and junior faculty. He served on over 50 doctoral dissertation committees and secured dissertation research funding for over 150 doctoral students. He has published over 125 peer reviewed articles and chapters and edited 7 books. He has been a principal investigator or collaborator on over $35 million (direct costs) of research and training grants.

The primary aim of his research examines social isolation as a behavioral health risk among older populations. To carry out this research, he developed the Lubben Social Network Scale (LSNS), an abbreviated measure designed for both research and clinical use among older populations. The LSNS has been translated into many languages and employed in studies throughout the world. Scores on the LSNS have been associated with a wide array of health indicators including mortality, morbidity, psychological distress and loneliness, cognitive impairment, and health care use.

Dr. Lubben served many years as a consultant to the World Health Organization regarding health and welfare systems development for aging societies.  He also served as a Fulbright Senior Specialist to Chile. Dr. Lubben served four terms (12 years) on the congressionally mandated Gerontology and Geriatrics Advisory Committee for the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. He was elected to three different national boards for social work education: Society for Social Work and Research, Council on Social Work Education, and the Group to Advance Doctoral Education. He also served two terms (6 years) on the Executive Committee for the Grand Challenges in Social Work Initiative sponsored by the American Academy of Social Work and Social Welfare. Dr. Lubben is a Fellow in the American Academy of Social Work and Social Welfare and also a Fellow of the Gerontological Society of America.

Selected Publications

Chi, I., Chappell, N. L., & Lubben, J.   (2001). Elderly Chinese in Pacific Rim Countries – Social Support and Integration. Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press.

Lubben, JE, Blozik, E, Gillmann, G, Iliffe, S, Kruse, WR, Beck, JC, Stuck, AE. (2006). Performance of an Abbreviated Version of the Lubben Social Network Scale among Three European Community-Dwelling Older Adult Populations. The Gerontologist, 46(4):503–513.

Crooks, VC, Lubben, JE, Petti, DB, Little, D & Chiu, V. (2008). Social Network, Cognitive Function and Dementia Incidence in Elderly Women. American Journal of Public Health. 98:1221-1227.  PMCID: PMC2424087

Lubben, JE. (2009). Cultivating a New Generation of Scholars: The Hartford Doctoral Fellows Program.  In NR Hooyman (Ed.), Transforming Social Work Education: The First Decade of the Hartford Geriatric Social Work Initiative. (pp. 79-97). Alexandria, VA: Council on Social Work Education Press.

Sabbath, EL, Lubben, JE, Goldberg, M, Berkman, LF (2015). Social engagement across the retirement transition among young-old adults in the French GAZEL cohort. European Journal of Ageing 12(4): 311-320.  PMCID: PMC5549155

Lubben, J. (2017).  Addressing social isolation as a potent killer! Public Policy & Aging Report. 27(4):136-138.

Fong, R., Lubben, J. & R. Barth, R.P. (Eds.). (2018). Grand Challenges for social work and society: Social progress powered by science. New York and Washington, DC: Oxford University Press.

Vilar-Compte, M; Vargas-Bustamante, A & Lubben, J. (2018). Validation study of the abbreviated version of the Lubben Social Network Scale Spanish translation among Mexican and Mexican-American older adults. Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology. 33:83-99.

Lachman, M. E., Lipsitz, L., Lubben, J., Castaneda-Sceppa, C., & Jette, A. M. (2018). When Adults Don’t Exercise: Behavioral Strategies to Increase Physical Activity in Sedentary Middle-Aged and Older Adults. Innovation in Aging, 2(1), gy007. http://doi.org/10.1093/geroni/igy007. PMCID: PMC6037047

Gary Orren

Gary Orren is a Visiting Professor of Public Policy at UCLA’s Luskin School of Public Affairs. He teaches and writes on public opinion, politics, and persuasion. He has worked in the United States and abroad as a pollster and strategist for government agencies, corporations, non-profits, candidates, and news organizations, including the Washington Post and the New York Times. He took a leading roll in creating the first national media poll, The New York Times/CBS News Poll. He helped draft the rules for the U.S. presidential nomination process and has assisted ABC News in its election night forecasting. On leave from Harvard, he worked for three years at the youth corps program City Year as a team leader and director of national policy and planning, and he served for 10 years on City Year’s National Board of Trustees.   His books include Equality in America: The View from the Top; Media and Momentum: The New Hampshire Primary and Nomination Politics; The Electronic Commonwealth: The Impact of New Media Technologies on Democratic Politics; and Media Polls in American Politics. He received his bachelor’s degree summa cum laude from Oberlin and his Ph.D. from Harvard. String instruments are his thing: playing some (violin, guitar) and playing with others (a tennis racket).

Steven H. Nemerovski

Steven H. Nemerovski is a Visiting Professor of Public Policy at UCLA’s Luskin School of Public Affairs. He is currently teaching “Advocacy and The Legislative Process”, a course designed to provide students with an understanding of the legislative process, the role of advocacy and the tools needed to navigate successful outcomes.

Professor Nemerovski has spent the greater part of his career in law, government and politics. He was the Parliamentarian for the Illinois House of Representatives (1995-96) and is an expert in legislative process. As an attorney in government service, Professor Nemerovski was General Counsel to the Illinois Housing Development Authority (1986-92), Special Counsel to The Speaker of the Illinois House of Representatives (1996-97) and outside general counsel to various state agencies in Illinois. He also served as Special Counsel to the Chief Executive Officer of Chicago Public Schools (1997-2000). His political experience includes serving as campaign manager for three campaigns for candidates seeking election to the Illinois House of Representatives and he has consulted on many other campaigns.

He is currently the President of Knell Consulting, Inc., a consulting firm specializing in advocacy at the state level in Illinois and at the Federal level in D.C. Professor Nemerovski has represented a wide variety of clients while generally specializing in healthcare. He is best known for his work representing hospitals that disproportionately serve Medicaid patients, including the Association of Safety-net Community Hospitals, an organization that he created and has represented since 2004.

Professor Nemerovski is actively engaged in efforts to confront and develop solutions for political dysfunction and polarization in the American political system. He produces the “None of The Above” television programming on Grassroots TV in Aspen, CO. He also produces the None of the Above website. Finally, he is the author of the “Third Party” series of political novels.

Hugo Sarmiento

Hugo Sarmiento is an instructor in the urban planning department.

His research considers emerging urban, housing and land use strategies for climate change adaptation. Relying on political economy, and political ecology, he examines the role of housing markets, social mobilization and grassroots resistance in shaping these strategies.

His most recent work has focused on the resettlement, and displacement, of communities vulnerable to the effects of climate change in Colombian cities. Hugo has a special interest in Latin American urban geographies having completed projects in Brazil, Colombia, El Salvador, Guatemala and Mexico.

V. Kelly Turner

V. Kelly Turner’s research addresses the relationship between institutions, urban design, and the environment through two interrelated questions: (1) How does urban design relate to ecosystem services in cities? and (2) To what extent do social institutions have the capacity to deliver those services? Her approach draws from social-ecological systems frameworks to address urban planning and design problem domains. In recent work she has used this approach to investigate microclimate regulation through New Urbanist design, water and biodiversity management through Homeowners Associations, and stormwater management through green infrastructure interventions.

Dr. Turner’s training is highly interdisciplinary. She received a Ph.D. in geography from the School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning at Arizona State University, where she was an IGERT Fellow in urban ecology. Her work is funded by the National Science Foundation and the interdisciplinary National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center. She recently chaired the Human Dimensions of Global Change specialty group of the American Association of Geographers. Dr. Turner deploys interdisciplinary pedagogy in the classroom and teaches courses in environmentalisms, urban sustainability, and urban ecology.

Publications

Ye, X., Turner, VK., and She, B. 2018. Automating land subdivision database cleaning and merging for neighborhood-scale urban analysis. International Journal of Digital Earth: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17538947.2018.1502370

Turner, V.K. and Kaplan, DH. 2018. Geographic Perspectives on Urban Sustainability: Past, Current, and Future Research Trajectories. Urban Geography. Online: https://doi.org/10.1080/02723638.2018.1475545

Mapes, J., Kaplan, D., Turner, VK., and Willer, C. 2017. Building ‘College Town’: Economic Redevelopment and the Construction of Community. Local Economy, 32(7).

Turner, V.K. and Galletti, C. May 24, 2017. Addressing Climate Change through Design: A Land Systems Science Approach to Assessing Microclimate Regulation in New Urbanist Developments. Public Square: A CNU Journal. Available Online: https://www.cnu.org/sites/default/files/2017_NewUrbanResearch_AddressingClimateChangeThroughDesign_TurnerGalletti.pdf

Turner, V.K. 2017. Developing Sustainable Cities: The Real Estate Rigidity Trap. Ecology and Society, 22(2):1.

Turner, V.K., Jarden, K.*, and Jefferson, A. 2016. Resident perspectives on green infrastructure in an experimental suburban stormwater management program. Cities & the Environment, 9(1): 4.

Turner, V.K. 2016. How do conventional master planning processes facilitate or constrain sustainable urbanism? An environmental management perspective. Society & Natural Resources, 29(12):1483-1500.

Shook, E. and Turner, V.K. 2016. The Socio-Environmental Data Explorer (SEDE): A Social Media Enhanced Decision Support System to Explore Risk Perception to Hazard Events. 2016. Cartography and GIS. DOI:10.1080/15230406.2015.1131627

Minn, M., Cutts, BB., Greenberg, JA., Fraterrigo, JM., and Turner, VK. 2015. Detection of Foreclosure-related Landscape Management Changes Using Landsat. Applied Geography, 62: 217-224.

Turner, V.K. and C.S. Galletti. 2015. Do sustainable urban designs generate more ecosystem services? A Case Study of Civano, Tucson, Arizona, USA. The Professional Geographer, 67(2):204-217.

Turner, V.K., K. Benessaiah, S. Warren, and D. Iwaneic. 2015. Essential Tensions in Interdisciplinary Environment-Society Research Centers. Higher Education, 70 (4):649-665.

Turner, V.K. 2014. Institutional Barriers to Sustainable Urban Development: A Case Study of Civano in Tucson, Arizona. Cities and the Environment, 7(2): 5.

Lerman, S.B., V.K. Turner, and C. Bang. 2012. Biodiversity in suburban developments: Homeowners Associations as a vehicle for promoting urban biodiversity. Ecology and Society, 17(4):45.

Turner, V.K. and D.C. Ibes. 2011. The Impact of Homeowners Associations on Residential Water Demand Management in Phoenix, AZ. Urban Geography, 32(8):1167-1188.

Elin, N. and V.K. Turner. 2010. Recycling the City: Darning Downtown Phoenix. Critical Planning, 17:155-173.

 

Liz Koslov

Liz Koslov is assistant professor of Urban Planning and the Institute of the Environment and Sustainability at UCLA, where she studies the social, cultural, and political dimensions of urban climate change adaptation.

Her current book project, “Retreat: Moving to Higher Ground in a Climate-Changed City,” is an ethnographic account of “managed retreat,” the process of relocating people and unbuilding land exposed to extreme weather and sea level rise. The book is based on fieldwork in the New York City borough of Staten Island, where residents organized in favor of home buyouts after Hurricane Sandy. A related article, The Case for Retreat, appears in Public Culture. Koslov has spoken about this research in outlets that include The New YorkerWWNO New Orleans Public Radio, and Scientific American.

Prior to coming to UCLA, Koslov was a Mellon postdoctoral fellow in the humanities at MIT.

Amada Armenta

Amada Armenta’s research examines the connections between the immigration enforcement system and the criminal justice system, and the implications of this connection for immigrants, bureaucracies, and cities.

Her award-winning book, “Protect Serve and Deport: The Rise of Policing as Immigration Enforcement” (University of California Press, 2017), analyzes the role of local law enforcement agencies in immigration enforcement in Nashville, Tennessee. Currently, she is working on her second book project, an examination of the legal attitudes of unauthorized Mexican immigrants in Philadelphia.

Dr. Armenta’s research has been published in journals of sociology, law and society, and policy. She has received research funding from the American Sociological Association, the National Science Foundation, the American Society of Criminology, and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Prior to joining Luskin as a faculty member, she was an assistant professor of sociology at the University of Pennsylvania.

Amy Ritterbusch

Dr. Ritterbusch has led social justice-oriented participatory action research initiatives with street-connected communities in Colombia for the last decade and recently in Uganda. Her work involves the documentation of human rights violations and forms of violence exerted against homeless individuals, sex workers, drug users and street-connected children and youth, and subsequent community-driven mobilizations to catalyze social justice outcomes within these communities. Throughout her research and teaching career she has explored different approaches to engaging students and community leaders through critical and responsible interaction between classroom and street spaces in Colombia and Uganda through the lens of social justice-oriented PAR. Her research has been funded by the Open Society Foundations, the National Science Foundation, the Fulbright U.S. Program and other networks promoting global social justice.

 

Selected Publications:

Ritterbusch, A, Correa, C. & Correa, A. (2018). Stigma-Related Access Barriers and Violence Against Trans Women in the Colombian Healthcare System Global Public Health doi:10.1080/17441692.2018.1455887

Ritterbusch, A. (2016).  Mobilities at Gunpoint: The Geographies of (Im)mobility of Transgender Sex Workers in Colombia. Annals of the Association of American Geographers 106(2), 422-433. doi: 10.1080/00045608.2015.1113112

Ritterbusch, A. (2016).  Exploring Social Inclusion Strategies for Public Health Research and Practice: The Use of Participatory Visual Methods to Counter Stigmas Surrounding Street-Based Substance Abuse in Colombia. Global Public Health 11(5-6), 600-617.

doi:10.1080/17441692.2016.1141971

Ritterbusch, A. (2012).  Bridging Guidelines and Practice: Toward a Grounded Care Ethics in  Youth Participatory Action Research. The Professional Geographer 64(1), 16 – 24.            doi:10.1080/00330124.2011.596783

Garcia, S. & Ritterbusch, A. (2015). Child Poverty in Colombia: Construction of a Multidimensional Measure Using a Mixed-Method Approach. Child Indicators Research 8(4), 801-823. doi: 10.1007/s12187-014-9274-2

 

Selected Advocacy and Collective Writing Initiatives in Latin America:

I have also supported social justice-oriented publications in both global human rights networks and policy circles in Colombia, including a human rights shadow report on violence against homeless communities and their right to the city in Bogotá and policy briefs written with community-based collaborators presenting recommendations for the protection of homeless communities and sex workers’ fundamental human rights:

Ritterbusch, A, Correa, A, Leon, S, Salamanca, J & Lanz, S. (2016). Ni aquí ni allá: las geografías emocionales de las trabajadoras sexuales transgénero, víctimas del conflicto armado. Nota de Política No. 25, Bogotá: Agosto de 2016. Available online:

https://egob.uniandes.edu.co/images/2016/publicaciones-np25-digital.pdf

Ritterbusch, A, Cubides M.I & Navarro, A. (2014). De la estigmatización de los consumidores de bazuco y pegante hacia la inclusión de sus voces en la política pública. Nota de Política No. 19, Bogotá: Noviembre de 2014. Available online:

https://egob.uniandes.edu.co/images/np19.pdf

 

Writing on Social Justice-Oriented PAR in Global Media Spaces:

https://theconversation.com/who-are-the-real-targets-of-bogotas-crackdown-on-crime-83949

 

Community Partnerships for Current PAR Initiatives:

*Red Comunitaria Trans (Bogotá, Colombia)

*Casa Diversa, Comuna 8 (Medellín, Colombia)

 

Global Action Research Networks:

HENA – UCLA:

CPC: http://www.cpcnetwork.org/partners/countries/colombia/

Chris Zepeda-Millán

Biography:

Born and raised in the East Los Angeles barrio of Boyle Heights, Chris Zepeda-Millán was the first Chicano to receive a Ph.D. from the Department of Government at Cornell University. His research has been published in top political science and interdisciplinary academic journals, such as the American Journal of Political Science (AJPS), Political Research Quarterly (PRQ), Politics, Groups and Identities (PGI), Critical Sociology, the Chicana/o Latina/o Law Review, Social Science Quarterly (SSQ), and the Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies (JEMS). His first book, Latino Mass Mobilization: Immigration, Racialization, and Activism (Cambridge University Press) received multiple national honors, including the prestigious Ralph J. Bunche “Best Book on Ethnic and Cultural Pluralism Award” from the American Political Science Association (APSA), the “Best Book on Race and Immigration Award” from the Race, Ethnicity, and Politics (REP) Section of the APSA, and the coveted “Charles Tilly Distinguished Contribution to Scholarship  Book Award” from the American Sociological Association’s Section on Collective Behavior and Social Movements.

As a publicly engaged scholar, Professor Zepeda-Millán has been interviewed by several local, national, and international media outlets. His public intellectual work includes working with local and national community organizations, publishing op-eds in local newspapers across the country, and being an invited contributor to NBC News, Latino Decisions, the London School of Economics’ USA blog, The Progress magazine, and The Huffington Post. Professor Zepeda-Millan has also been involved in various social movements related to environmental and global justice, labor, student, immigrant, and indigenous rights.

Prior to joining the Departments of Public Policy and Chicana/o Studies and becoming the Director of Faculty Research for the Latino Policy & Politics Initiative (LPPI) at UCLA, Professor Zepeda-Millán was a Provost Postdoctoral Scholar in the Department of Political Science at the University of Chicago, as well as a faculty member at Loyola Marymount University and UC Berkeley, where he chaired the Center for Research on Social Change.

Courses:

Immigration Policy
Latino Politics
Social Movements
Racial Politics
Interdisciplinary Research Methods
Urban Politics

Books:

Latino Mass Mobilization: Immigration, Racialization, and Activism (Cambridge University Press 2017).

Selected Articles & Book Chapters:

“Mobilizing for Immigrant Rights Under Trump.”
With Sophia Wallace. Charting the Resistance: The Emergence of the Movement Against President Donald Trump. Eds. Sidney Tarrow and David Mayer (Forthcoming, Oxford University Press).

“The Political Effects of Having Undocumented Parents: How Parental Illegality Impacts the Political Behavior of their U.S.-Born Children.”
With Alex Street and Michael Jones-Correa. Political Research Quarterly. Vol. 70 (4): 818-832, 2017.

“The Impact of Large-Scale Collective Action on Latino Perceptions of Commonality and Competition with African-Americans.”
With Michael Jones-Correa and Sophia Wallace. Social Science Quarterly (SSQ), Vol. 97 (2): 458-475, 2016.

“Weapons of the (Not So) Weak: Immigrant Mass Mobilization in the U.S. South.”
Critical Sociology, Vol. 42 (2): 269-287, 2016.

“Mass Deportation and the Future of Latino Partisanship.”
With Alex Street and Michael Jones-Correa. Social Science Quarterly (SSQ), Vol. 96 (2): 540-552, 2015.

“Perceptions of Threat, Demographic Diversity, and the Framing of Illegality: Explaining (non)Participation in New York’s 2006 Immigrant Protests.”
Political Research Quarterly (PRQ), 67(4): 880-888, 2014.

“Triangulation in Social Movement Research.”
With Phil M. Ayoub and Sophia J. Wallace. Methodological Practices In Social Movement Research. Donatella della Porta (Ed.), Oxford University Press, 2014.

“Spatial and Temporal Proximity:  Examining the Effects of the 2006 Immigrant Rights Marches on Political Attitudes.”
With Sophia Wallace and Michael Jones-Correa. American Journal of Political Science (AJPS), 58(2): 433-448, 2014.

“Racialization in Times of Contention:  How Social Movements Influence Latino Racial Identity.”
With Sophia Wallace. Politics, Groups, and Identities (PGI), 1(4): 510-527, 2013.

“Undocumented Immigrant Activism and Rights.”
Battleground Immigration: The New Immigrants, Vol. 2., Ed. Judith Warner, Westport, CT: Greenwood, 2008.