• Second Year Placement Process

    UCLA Social Welfare Placement Fair 2019

The UCLA Department of Social Welfare Field Education Team congratulates to reaching this pivotal point in your career.  Your second year placement should help you build skills, knowledge, and values about social work practice and yourself.  It should propel you towards professional growth through personal reflection of work habits, biases, and knowledge development.  Use this process to reflect your interests, values, and professional goals.

Each year the department works with approximately ninety agencies to place the second year interns.  A myriad of specialties, concentrations, and populations are available to meet your interests and learning needs.  The placement process is a specific and well-thought out event that is meant to provide you with the best learning/teaching opportunity.

On January 15, the field education team hosted an orientation to the second-year placement process.  The recording of orientation is available above.  A timeline is available below for easy navigation.

We encourage you to use this website as a resource and a starting point to learn more about the latest development in the second year placement process.  Please do not hesitate to contact Carmen Mancha, cmancha@luskin.ucla.edu for further information or suggestions.

Second Year Placement Process

After completing your generalist-base first year in the MSW program, you will select an Area of Concentration (AoC) as a focus for your second-year practice, leadership, and theory curriculum and field practicum.  Each AoC will host an informational session in February to provide more in-depth information. The three AoC options are:

All MSW courses are scheduled on Tuesdays and Thursdays and you are expected to be available for classes on those days

Field Education (402ABC) 

The field course provides the student with an opportunity to practice, develop, and enhance professional experiences within the field of Social Work. Clients, field instructors, agencies, and communities join with the field liaison and academic faculty in providing learning experiences and challenges to the social work student. The field placement experience is a critical part of the students learning process. It is the point of interaction between the university, the community, and the student. Field Placement provides a laboratory-type experience for testing practice skills and theory while simultaneously allowing for a set of real-time experiences to assess the value of that knowledge in the lives of people in the community.  Field instruction is scheduled for Mondays, Wednesdays, and Friday.  Unlike your first year internship, you are expected to complete 20 hours per week.

9 Steps to Secure a Field Placement

  1. Research! Look at all the available agencies hosting students.   IPT is a great starting point that provides information about field placement agencies. Part of research also included reading about stipends available, credential programs, AoCs, etc.
  2. Meet with Agency Liaison and assigned Field Liaison.  They can give you insight on the program.  Availability and best method of communication is posted in the Field Faculty section below.
  3. Attend Placement Fair.  It is a great opportunity to ask questions to agency representatives.  This is the only opportunity students can communicate with agencies prior to choosing the two agencies students will interview.
  4. Submit your Interview Choice Form.  This form notifies the department where you will schedule your interviews.  Carmen Mancha, Field Advisor, notifies agencies which students will contact them to schedule interviews or attend Open Houses.  The form is due Thursday, February 25. When you submit the form, if the agency has specific instructions on their interview process, an email will be sent to you with that information.
  5. Schedule your Interview with Field Placement Agency.  Students can begin scheduling interviews starting on Friday, February 26.   The interview window is from Friday, February 26 to Friday, April 30.  Do not schedule any interviews until you have submitted the interview choice form.  The department notifies agencies who will be reaching out to schedule an interview.
  6. Interviews & Open Houses. Prepare for your interviews by researching information agencies provide on IPT.  Visit the Luskin’s Career Center.  MSW students from other programs are also interviewing for open slots.  Remember when you’re interviewing with a company/organization that you are interviewing them, as much as they are interviewing you.  Send a follow-up email after the interview.  After this, please do not continue your communication with agencies.
  7. Submit the Student Agency Choice Response sheet.  This form indicates your rankings on where you’d prefer to complete your second year internship.  Students and agencies submit a similar form indicating their rankings on Friday, April 30.
  8. Matching Process. After agencies and students submit rankings, the field education team begins the matching process.  The sooner we receive all submissions from students, the faster we are able to confirm matches.  Once we have around 85% confirmed, Carmen will send a confirmation email to agency and student.
  9. MATCHED! Congratulation you are matched! This is a great time to ask the agency what their onboarding process looks like and whether you should block out any dates during summer break for trainings.

Placement Process Overview

Research

The first step towards securing an internship for your second year in the MSW is to conduct research.  Students are only able to interview for two agencies.  Performing research to make an informed decision is imperative.  The research process of the placement process should consist of the following:

  • Review Agency’s IPT profile
  • Meet with Agency/Field Liaison
  • Attend events that will provide more information on programs, AoCs, etc.
  • Read about stipends available
  • Go to the Placement Fair

*If you are interested in a Summer Block placement, please see section below.

Each year the number of agencies taking interns fluctuates due to a myriad of reasons.  Start your search on IPT.  The site will list all of the agencies who are taking students for the 2021-2022 cycle.  Agency’s request will continuously be updated so make sure to check often.  The sorting function on IPT will facilitate searching using different parameters.

Access the following information on the Agency’s IPT page:

  • Location
  • Agency Liaison
  • Number of Intern they are taking
  • Stipends available
  • Agency description
  • Agency website
  • Requirements
  • Agency Field Liaison
  • Population served

How to use the sorting function:

  1. Log into IPT
  2. Click on the “Agency List” tab available on the home page
  3. A list of all affiliated agencies will populate.  This list reflects all of the agencies that have an existing affiliated agreement with UCLA Social Welfare.  It does NOT reflect the agencies that are able to host students for the 2021-22 academic year.
  4. Click on “Sort” option available on left hand side.
  5. Three different sorting options will be available.  The first one must be “How Many 2nd Yrs for 2021-22” or “Will you accept summer students” (for dual degrees or summer block students”.  Choose your preference for the other two options.
  6. A list will populate.  Click on the last page to review the options.

Agencies

In December, all of our affiliated agencies received an invitation to participate in the 2021-2022 UCLA placement process for the second year. Agencies then send their request to Carmen who inputs the information onto IPT or the agency directly updates their page.  IPT holds the most up-to-date information on internship requests. Agency descriptions are continuously updated on IPT, check back often.  Each year agencies’ ability to host interns fluctuates.  When agencies send in their request, they provide vast information on their internship program, requirements, stipends (if available), and contact information.  Please review the entirety of the agency page to get a better understanding.  

Because this is the first year where we have to undergo the placement process entirely online, the department encouraged agencies to send in additional recruitment information.   Flyers, videos, and other recruitment advertisements are available below.  Because of the limitations of IPT, they could not be included in their IPT profile.

  

Santa Monica Malibu Unified School District

The Santa Monica-Malibu Unified School district serves K-12 public school students in the cities of Santa Monica and Malibu. Under the supervision of the Coordinator of Mental Health Counseling, PPS students will provide school-based mental health counseling (individual and groups), case management, and advocacy for a caseload of about 10 students of diverse backgrounds at two different age groups/ sites throughout Santa Monica. Weekly individual supervision will be provided to interns, as well as biweekly group supervision or clinical trainings. Interns will have the opportunity to work with staff from school counseling, school psychology, and school administration in a team approach to support student success. The start of the school year will also include participation in attendance recovery outreach and ongoing training activities will be provided to ensure completion of requirement for the CWA and PPS credentials.

Phoenix House

Phoenix House offers a continuum of services to meet the individualized needs of our patients ages 13-17 years old for our residential program and 5 to 18 for our outpatient programs . The length of the residential portion of treatment and outpatient program is determined on an individual basis and is affected by patient needs, patient and family preferences, the patient’s progress in treatment and by other stake holders input including court orders.
Interns will be exposed and trained to the following Evidenced Based Practices including Cognitive Behavioral Interventions for Substance Abuse (CBI-SA), Managing and Adapting Practices (MAP), Seeking Safety and Trauma Focus CBT. Interns will have the opportunity to provide case management, individual and family therapy and co-facilitate groups.

Children’s Hospital, Division of Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine

The Division of Adolescent Medicine and Young Adult Medicine at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles provides a single resource for comprehensive and integrated medical, psychological and related services that address the special needs of today’s young people.

Our expert, interdisciplinary staff focus on both treatment and prevention using a model of positive youth development to reach out to and engage teens with an entire system of care.

Depending on program, age of clients range from 12 to 25 years of age. Target populations in programs accepting social work interns include youth and young adults with mental health and substance use disorders, transgender, gay and bisexual young men, HIV+, youth experiencing homelessness, pregnant and parenting teens, TAY with complex medical issues.

CHLA Division of Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine (DAYAM) has many community partnerships in order to better serve young people. Many DAYAM interns provide services in community locations (such as homeless drop in centers and shelters, HIV testing locations, high schools and middle schools) and come to CHLA for supervision and training.

LIFT- Los Angeles

Founded in 1998, LIFT is a national nonprofit that empowers families to break the cycle of poverty. We operate program sites in four major cities _ Chicago, Los Angeles, New York and Washington, D.C. _ where we connect hardworking parents and caregivers of young children to the people, tools and resources they need to achieve greater economic security and well-being. We believe that by investing in families during children’s earliest years, we can break the cycle of intergenerational poverty. We are looking for entrepreneurial, results-driven relationship builders who are committed to LIFT’s mission and values. To learn more, visit www.liftcommunities.org.

Jewish Family Service LA

Since 1854, Jewish Family Service (JFS) has provided vital services to people of all ages, ethnicities and religions. JFS’ nationally recognized programs provides personal growth opportunities for people of all ages, counsel families and individuals, support the elderly and the recent immigrant, house the homeless and abused, and feed the hungry. JFS’ staff of more than 400 includes licensed clinical social workers, psychologists, public health experts, physical therapists, gerontologists, nurses, chefs, drivers and more. They, along with more than 1,000 dedicated volunteers serve more than 60,000 people every year. JFS is a non-profit and non-sectarian agency.

JFSLA Website

https://www.jfsla.org/

JFS Family Portrait – Shannon – New Moms Connect

JFS 2019 Gala Video

Shelter & Supporting Survivor of Domestic Abuse in a Time of Quarantine

A Very Important Message About Domestic Violence

Centinela Valley Union High School District

Centinela Valley Union High School District (CVUHSD) provides academic instruction to roughly 7,000 students in grades 9-12. We serve the areas of Lawndale, Lennox, Hawthorne and portions of Inglewood. We are currently in our fourth year as a Field Placement site for MSW and BASW students. Partnering with our feeder schools (Hawthorne School District), we offer secondary grade-range placement options (both elementary and middle school) for students pursuing their PPSC in School Social Work. We offer micro, mezzo and macro-focused placement opportunities however.

https://vimeo.com/user131357295/review/501092864/65165c81fc

Providence Saint John’s Child and Family Development Center

CFDC has always maintained a deep commitment to the education of social work graduate interns and is well known for providing a varied and rich training program. This is illustrated in part by the longevity of CFDC’s social work training program which has been training interns since the 1960s. The training program involves child and family outpatient mental health services with efforts made to ensure that trainees receive a varied caseload in terms of age, gender, culture, and diagnoses. We are strongly oriented to child-centered family focused treatment. Interns can expect to receive a good experiential grounding in clinical work with children, adolescents and their parents utilizing a wide range of evidence based brief therapy treatment modalities and treatment venues (i.e. school, community and home-based, as well as the Center).

Pasadena Unified School District

This field placement offers the dual opportunity to learn County DMH requirements and earn a PPSC. PUSD has a contract with LA County DMH to provide mental health services for PUSD students with mental health problems from kindergarten through high school. Interns will have their own student client caseload of six to eight clients, on average. Interns will provide all services for these clients that an employed Clinical Social Worker provides. Interns will provide bio-psycho-social-cultural assessments including complete mental status exams and will make DSM-5 and ICD-10 diagnoses. Interns will develop treatment plans with specific behavioral objectives and time-frames. Interns will provide individual, collateral and family treatment. Interns will collaborate with school personnel and will participate in Student Study Team and Individual Education Program meetings. Interns will collaborate with mental health treatment team including psychiatrist and nurse practitioner and behavior specialist and support staff. Interns will learn an evidence based practice approved by DMH, Managing and Adapting Practice (MAP) and outcome measures as required by DMH. Interns will have the opportunity to become certified as MAP therapist, which is paid for by PUSD MHS if completed within the internship year. Interns will learn and provide clinical documentation as required by DMH. Interns will be trained in and will use electronic health record system to document services. Interns will also participate in the Attendance Project and/or other PPSC project, if applicable.

Para Los Niños

Mission

Para Los Ninos raises children out of poverty and into brighter futures through positive educational opportunities and wrap-around support.

What We Do

Founded on Skid Row in 1980, Para Los Ninos is a nonprofit social services and education organization dedicated to the success of L.A.’s neediest children and families. With six early education centers and three charter schools serving some 1,570 low-income children (ages 6 months to 14 years), Para Los Ninos places education at the core of its mission to break the cycle of poverty. The organization provides a comprehensive social services model that incorporates: high-quality education, family support and mental health services, parent engagement and community building opportunities to thousands of children living in at-risk neighborhoods in Los Angeles County. Para Los Ninos serves 5,100 children, youth and families each year.

Social & Emotional Wellness Initiative (SEWI)

The Social & Emotional Wellness Initiative (SEWI) is a three-prong organization which strives to better the lives of the youth we serve, along with their families, their social & emotional wellness. ​Originally born out of a Boys & Girls Club, SEWI has grown to become its own independent organization which serves the Greater Los Angeles County area by providing MSW Interns to youth serving organizations, training staff and other company employees, and developing curriculum to meet the needs of youth today. ​MSW Interns are trained in Restorative Circles facilitation and Solution Focused Therapy, and will have opportunities for individual and group counseling, crisis intervention, behavioral support, and related experiences.

Video: https://ucla.box.com/s/uh62acranxs8oyp1txs0z5d69vkoyar0

LA Co., DMH, Edelman MH - Adult

Directly operated Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health Adult Outpatient clinic. The programs offered at our clinic include: FSP, Dual Diagnosis, Community Outreach, Outpatient Case Management, Individual & Group Therapy. Edelman Community Mental Health Center is a directly operated L.A. County Department of Mental Health program serving the severely and persistently mentally ill population of the Westside community. This is an Adult Outpatient clinic providing crisis evaluation, brief treatment, case management, medication management, group therapy and individual counseling.

Video: https://ucla.box.com/s/hltshjpcht106jraw5yun5ocvahpm0h9

LAUSD PSA

Pupil Services mission ensures the all LAUSD students are enrolled, attending, engaged and on track to graduate.  There are six programs under Pupil Services.  If you would like to receive more information on the following programs, please visit the website link displayed on the screen.

SSG/Asian Pacific Counseling & Treatment Centers

The mission of APCTC is to meet the continuously growing mental health needs of our diverse Asian Pacific and other ethnic communities through the development and efficient management of culturally and linguistically appropriate mental health services. To maximize the student’s experience and to achieve the required traineeship hours, candidates should speak an Asian language or Spanish.

Prospective Intern Letter 1-29-19

MSW Internship Description 1-12-21

Aviva Family and Children’s Services

Aviva Community Mental Health Services (CMHS) provides outpatient clinical and case management services to children and families within the  metropolitan Los Angeles area.  Aviva CMHS treatment services are available to children, adolescents, and adults (and their families) that present with a mental health diagnosis and functional impairments.

Meeting with Agency/Field Liaison

Each agency has an assigned field liaison.    They are assigned to the field faculty who has the most experience on the agency, population served, and area of concentration.  They have vast and intimate information on what the agency and the internship. Ask them questions on what type of supervision and support the field instructor offers, incentives not listed on IPT, or the agency’s culture.

Meetings with agency liaisons are meant to help you refine your choices. Be prepared to share a little about your goals and what attracted you to that specific agency/internship.  They can provide insight on the program and even suggest other agencies that align better with your vision.  Students must meet with the assigned agency liaison before submitting the Interview Choice form (due Thursday, February 25).

Below is the list of the field faculty and their preferred method of communication.

Field Education Faculty

Laura Alongi

CalSWEC Public Child Welfare Project Coordinator

Child & Family Well-Being

Best way to contact her is via email: alongi@luskin.ucla.edu

Specialization: Child & Youth, Mental Health, Public Child Welfare, Military Social Work

Larthia Dunham

Social & Economic Justice

Best way to contact him is via phone call (310) 429-4930.  He takes appointments.

Specialization: Child & Youth, Mental Health, Community Policy, Public Child Welfare, International Social Work

Toby Hur

Social & Economic Justice Chair

Best way to contact him is via email: thur@luskin.ucla.edu

Office Hours: luskin.ucla.edu/book-toby

Specialization: Community Policy, Governmental Settings

Tranishia James

Child & Family Well-Being

Best way to contact her is via email: tjames@luskin.ucla.edu

Specialization: Children, Youth and Families and Public Child Welfare

Gerry Laviña

Director of Field Education

Health & Mental Health Across the Lifespan

Best way to contact him is via email: glavina@g.ucla.edu

Specialization: Mental Health Stipend, GSWEC Stipend

Hector Palencia

Child & Family Well-Being Chair

Best way to contact him is via email hpalencia@luskin.ucla.edu to schedule an email.

Specialization: School Social Work

Michelle Talley

Health & Mental Health Across the Lifespan Chair

Best way to reach her is via email talley@luskin.ucla.edu to schedule an appointment.

Specialization: Child & Youth, Mental Health, Juvenile Justice, Public Child Welfare

Placement Fair

0Weeks0Days0Hours0Minutes0Seconds

The objective of the placement fair is for you to learn about potential internship sites and enhance your research you have already started on potential second year internships.  You will the opportunity to interact one-on-one with agencies of interest while discovering a myriad of internships.  You can gain awareness of agencies and ask questions that are not answered in their IPT profiles.  

The event is not meant to schedule/ receive invitations for an interview.  Please do not share your resume or contact agencies until you have submitted your Interview Choice Form (due Thursday, February 25).

Date: Friday, February 12

Time: 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

Location/Format: Zoom link will be emailed as date approaches.  The department will set up a Zoom Meeting Room for attendees.  Once joined, participants will be able to see a list of agencies who registered in the breakout room list.  This is the first year the fair will be online so expect some technical difficulties.

How to prepare for the Placement Fair

  • Research all agencies who have requested interns via IPT
  • View the list of all participating agencies
  • Make a list of agencies that you are interested in and research them.  Visit their websites, learn about their requirements, population served, stipends, and prepare questions.
  • Work on your elevator pitch
  • Consider using a neutral Zoom backdrop
  • For optimal performance, plan ahead to minimize any errors as best you can.  Keep in mind that this is the first time we host an online fair so everyone is more flexible and understanding.
  • Attend Donna’s “MSW 2nd Year Placement Fair Preparation Workshop” on February 5

Day of Placement Fair

  • It would be ideal for you to have your cameras on so the agency representative can connect with you but we understand that Zoom fatigue is real and we encourage you to show up in the way that feels comfortable to you.
  • I too have worn leisure wear since March 2020 but for the placement fair, it would be ideal to wear professional attire following your gender expression. 
  • Ensure that your name is visible when you login into Zoom.  Consider adding your preferred pronouns. (i.e. “Carmen| She/her”)
  • Have a list of questions for agencies you are interested in.  Your preparation will become evident in your interaction with organization representatives, helping you stand out.
  • Placement Fair is a great opportunity to visit agencies that you may not have an interest in.  They might surprise you.
  • Be positive and confident!

Note: Do not exchange contact information during the event.  It is meant more as an opportunity to research since you are not able to contact representatives.

Events

Share Day

Information session coordinated by Student Alliance for first year students to talk about the second year students about their placement and the process.

Date: Tuesday, January 19

Time: 12:30 – 1:45 pm

Professor Hector Palencia will provide more information on PPSC/SSW/CWA.  He will discuss expectations, class requirements, and placements.

Date: Thursday, January 21

Time: 12:30 – 1:45 pm

The David Bohnett Fellowship Program was established as a hands-on working experience in the City of Los Angeles Mayor’s Office for exceptionally promising public policy, social welfare, and urban planning students.

Date: January 19

Time: 12:30 – 1:30 pm

The David Bohnett Fellowship Program was established as a hands-on working experience in the City of Los Angeles Mayor’s Office for exceptionally promising public policy, social welfare, and urban planning students. The Bohnett Fellowship Program will offer students first-hand experience in the highest levels of city government and will provide senior executives in the Mayor’s office with an outstanding cohort of policy interns. Three UCLA Luskin students will be selected. $35,000

Date: January 22

Time: 12:00 – 1:00 pm

UCLA Luskin Leadership Fellowship is a high-level apprenticeship program for exceptional public policy, social welfare and urban planning graduate students that serve within selected government agencies and nonprofit and civic organizations to work on research, policy, advocacy and applied projects tailored to the students’ tracks of study and consistent with the mission and goals of the organization. For 2021-2022, the host organization will be the Los Angeles County, Office of Child Protection. $30,000 (to be confirmed)

Date: January 26

Time: 12:30 – 1:30 pm

Learn about the Health and Mental Health Across the Lifespan AoC. To orient you to each of our Areas of Concentration, the Department has set up info sessions to help you decide which AOC you would like to follow in the Spring and for your second year in the program.

Co-chairs: Dr. Lené Levy-Storms and Michelle Talley

Date: Tuesday, February 2

Time: 12:30-2:00 pm

Learn about the Social & Economic Justice AoC. To orient you to each of our Areas of Concentration, the Department has set up info sessions to help you decide which AOC you would like to follow in the Spring and for your second year in the program.

Co-chairs: Dr. Ananya Roy and Toby Hur

Date: Tuesday, February 4

Time: 12:30-2:00 pm

This workshop will focus on how to present your best self at the virtual 2nd Year Placement Fair. Donna Lee Oda from Luskin Career Services will be sharing tips and tricks, including managing technical equipment, lighting, elevator pitches and more! This will only take 30 minutes of your time!

Date: Friday, February 5

Time: 11:00-11:30 am

RSVP

Learn about the Child and Family Well-Being AoC. To orient you to each of our Areas of Concentration, the Department has set up info sessions to help you decide which AOC you would like to follow in the Spring and for your second year in the program.

Co-chairs: Dr. Carlos Santos and Hector Palencia

Date: Tuesday, February 11

Time: 12:30-2:00 pm

Placement fair gives you an opportunity to meet agency representatives, establish professional relationships, and discuss internship opportunities.  A list of all agencies who RSVP’d is available.

Date: Friday, February 12

Time: 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

Stipends

  • Geriatric Social Work Education Consortium (GSWEC)

    GSWEC (Geriatric Social Work Education Consortium) is a collaboration among eight Graduate Schools of Social Work and eleven community agencies specializing in services for older adults. It was established in 1999 to provide aging-focused 2nd year field placements and competency­ driven geriatric social work field education.

    GSWEC field placements are structured to provide students with a well-rounded experience of social work with older adults.

    GSWEC Student Guide 2021

    The GSWEC consortium includes:

    Eight Southern California Graduate Schools of Social Work

    • Azusa Pacific University
    • California State University, Dominguez Hills
    • California State University, Fullerton
    • California State University, Long Beach
    • California State University, Los Angeles
    • California State University, Northridge
    • University of California, Los Angeles
    • University of Southern California

    Eleven Centers of Excellence in Geriatric Social Work Field Education:

    • AltaMed
    • Alzheimer’s Greater Los Angeles
    • Beach Cities Health District
    • Huntington Senior Care Network
    • Jewish Family Service
    • Motion Picture and Television Fund
    • Pacific Clinics
    • Partners in Care Foundation
    • Special Service for Groups/SIL VER
    • VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System
    • WISE & Healthy Aging

    Stipend amount: $4,000-6,000

    Years of Funding: 1 year (second year only)

    Post-degree Work Commitment: None

    Application Due: Wednesday, February 5

    Mandatory Orientation: Wednesday, February 17 | 1:00-4:00 pm GSWEC Agency Orientation 2021 Flyer

    Application: GSWEC 2021-22 Application

    Agency Choice Response Sheet: GSWEC Form 21-22 Student Agency Choice Response Sheet. pdf

  • LA Co., DMH, Mental Health Stipend

    The LACDMH stipend is for graduate students who are in their second year of field placement, who will graduate in May 2022, and who are interested in pursuing a social work career in the public mental health field.

    • Stipend Amount: $18,500
      Years of Funding: 1 year (second year only)
      Post-degree Work Commitment: 1 year
    • **Priority area isBilingual candidates

    Applications will be emailed to all students in eligible placements once your second year field education internship is confirmed.

    Please note: this stipend program is dependent of the availability of county funds.

  • UCLA Luskin Schoolwide Fellowships

    UCLA Luskin offers a limited number of yearlong fellowships with nonprofit organizations, government and public service agencies.  Placement opportunities include public health, child welfare, education policy, social justice, environmental policy, city/county government, and other public service organizations. Currently enrolled first-year Public Policy, Social Welfare, and Urban Planning students are eligible to apply for awards. The fellowships are full-time during the summer and part-time during the 9-month academic year (fall 2021 through spring 2022).

    Below are awards available for the 2021-22 school year:

    David Bohnett Fellowship in the City of Los Angeles Mayor’s Office 

    The David Bohnett Fellowship Program was established as a hands-on working experience in the City of Los Angeles Mayor’s Office for exceptionally promising public policy, social welfare, and urban planning students. The Bohnett Fellowship Program will offer students first-hand experience in the highest levels of city government and will provide senior executives in the Mayor’s office with an outstanding cohort of policy interns. Three UCLA Luskin students will be selected. $35,000

    Luskin Leadership Fellowship at the Office of Child Protection, Los Angeles County

    UCLA Luskin Leadership Fellowship is a high-level apprenticeship program for exceptional public policy, social welfare and urban planning graduate students that serve within selected government agencies and nonprofit and civic organizations to work on research, policy, advocacy and applied projects tailored to the students’ tracks of study and consistent with the mission and goals of the organization. For 2021-2022, the host organization will be the Los Angeles County, Office of Child Protection. $30,000 (to be confirmed)

    Application Process

    1. Please submit your application to associated job posting in Luskin CareerHub.
    2. Applications can be submitted between Monday, January 11 at 5 pm PT and Friday, February 12 at 5 pm PT. No applications will be accepted after the Friday, February 12th deadline. Check back for the specific links to the job postings.
    3. Students may apply for both awards, but if applying to both, students need to submit an individual application for each.
    4. Your application will include a letter of interest prepared as a two-page cover letter, not a personal statement and your resume. Address cover letter to: “Dear Selection Committee”
    5. The applications will first be reviewed by the academic departments for merit and to determine if the applicants’ academic program is a good match to the organization. For the Bohnett Fellowship, the Mayor’s Office may also prescreen applications to help select finalists to be interviewed.
    6. Finalists will be interviewed in March/April and will be asked to provide a 2-5 page (maximum) writing sample prior to the interview.
    7. The Bohnett Fellowship will select three Luskin students for the Office of the Mayor; the Office of Child Protection will select one Luskin student.

    Information Sessions

    All students interested in applying for one or both of yearlong fellowships are highly encouraged to attend one of the below information sessions to learn more and get your questions answered. Current fellows and/or representatives from the host organization will be in attendance.

    Yearlong Fellowships (Bohnett & Office of Child Protection) Info Session

    January 19 | 12:30 – 1:30 pm

    Bohnett Fellowship Information Session 

    January 22 | 12:00 – 1:00 pm

    Office of Child Protection (OCP) Fellowship Information Session

    January 26 | 12:30 – 1:30 pm

    Important Note: In some cases, final award amounts may be adjusted for indirect costs and/or taxes. Awards requested at the $30,000 level may be adjusted to approximately $27,050. Awards may also impact students’ financial aid packages. In all cases, students will be notified of final award amount and are strongly encouraged to discuss possible financial aid impact with UCLA Financial Aid Office.

    Deadline is Friday, February 12 by 5pm.

    Questions? Email Caroline Lee at leaders@luskin.ucla.edu.

Summer Block 2021

Traditional Full-Time MSW Students

Summer Block placements are arranged for any regular, full-time students in the MSW During the 2nd Year Placement Process, the student begins the consultation process with his/her current Field Faculty Liaison to identify potential summer block placements.  Summer Block placements are subject to agency availability.

These placements are not intended for a student who fails to maintain good standing in their First Year MSW field placement. Summer Block placements are designed to fulfill the requirements for a student’s 2nd Year Area of Concentration Placement.

Students in PCW stipend programs are not eligible for summer block placements.  Students also considering  the PPSC/SSW/CWA should consider a regular academic year placement since most school districts in southern CA do not have summer hours or Field Instructors working in the summer.

Placement Requirements 

  1. There are no designated summer block agencies. Agencies are approached and developed as Summer Block placements by the current Field Liaison for the approved agency in conjunction with the student’s Field Liaison and the Field Education team. In order for a site to be considered as a Summer Block placement, the agency must meet the same requirements as agencies in use by the Field Department during the regular academic year.
  2. Summer Block placements are considered full time placements. Students are expected to be in placement:
    • Minimum 608 hours over the summer months;
    • the Summer Block placement will begin after the successful completion of the first year field placement;
    • this would equal 17 weeks at 40 hours per week;
  3. Students will have 2 excused absences in addition to Independence Day (7/5), Labor Day Holiday (9/6) and Fall quarter classes (9/23, 9/28, 9/30, 10/4, 10/7).
  4. Start and End dates for the Summer of 2021 would typically be as follows:
    1. Start date: 6/14/21
    2. End date: 10/8/21
    3. Any other schedule would require written approval by the Summer Block Field Liaison and the Director of Field
    4. Overall the goal is to complete the hours required for summer block in a manner, which fits the placement site, the field instructor, the student, and the academic expectations. Agencies often need to modify the days and hours of field placement during the early September weeks to accommodate regular 1st or 2nd year internship students beginning their placements. Your field liaison will work with you around the schedule modifications that may be needed at your unique site during the last weeks of summer block
  5. The student’s Learning Agreement is due by the end of the 2nd week in
  6. There will be two (2) Evaluation Periods for the Summer Block Placement:
    1. there will be two (2) written evaluations of the student by the Field Instructor
      1. the first Evaluation is due mid-way through the placement, by the end of July,
      2. the second Evaluation is due the week prior to the last week of placement;
    2. the student will be expected to do two (2) Self Evaluations at the same time intervals as above;
    3. the Field Liaison will make two (2) placement visits during the Summer Block Placement.
  7. Because these placements are full time, compared to the regular academic year in which placements are 2-3 days per week, the supervision requirement for placement can be modified. These include:
    1. Students will be expected to receive up to 1-3 hours of individual supervision per week;
    2. 1 hour minimum of this supervision should be with the primary supervisor;
    3. the remaining supervision may be provided on an individual basis by one or more preceptors;
    4. group supervision-
      1. Good Supervision Guidelines
        1. group supervision cannot be used to replace the 1 hour of required primary individual supervision,
        2. group supervision can be used for all or part of the supervision above the 1 hour of individual supervision,
        3. group supervision may be designed for supervision and consultation purposes, a clinical or program team meeting in which there is a supervisory leader, seminars designed to improve skills or knowledge that enhances the student’s ability to engage in the work, and in some cases staff meetings or administrative meetings,
        4. students may be included in groups which include supervisors, staff, and trainees from other disciplines,
        5. the supervisory plan should be documented in the Learning Agreement and will be approved by the Summer Block Field Liaison
  8. The Field Instructor and the student will have access to UCLA IPT (Intern Placement Tracking) for documentation and evaluation forms.
  9. The Summer Block Field Instructor can access a copy of the Field Education Handbook online.
  10. Summer Block students must be enrolled in summer sessions.  Students must enroll in SOC WEL 402 ABC (12 units).  Estimated tuition cost $4,754.

Dual Degree MSW Students

Summer Block placements are arranged for students in the MSW/PhD program after approval from the Chair of the Doctoral Program indicating that this is the field placement option that the student will complete. Through the MOU with MSW and MPP programs, combined MSW/MPP students will also complete a summer block placement. During the 2nd Year Placement Process, the student begins the consultation process with his/her current Field Faculty Liaison to identify potential summer block placements.

These placements are not intended for a student who fails to maintain good standing in their First Year MSW field placement. Summer Block placements are designed to fulfill the requirements for a student’s Second Year Concentration or Specialization Placement

Placement Requirements 

  1. There are no designated summer block agencies. Agencies are approached and developed as Summer Block placements by the current Field Liaison for the approved agency in conjunction with the student’s Field Liaison and the Field Education team. In order for a site to be considered as a Summer Block placement, the agency must meet the same requirements as agencies in use by the Field Department during the regular academic year.
  2. Summer Block placements are considered full time placements. Students are expected to be in placement:
    • Minimum 520 hours over the summer months;
    • the Summer Block placement will begin after the successful completion of the first year field placement;
    • this would equal 14 weeks at 40 hours per week;
  3. Students will have 2 excused absences in addition to Independence Day (7/5), Labor Day Holiday (9/6).
  4. Start and End dates for the Summer of 2021 would typically be as follows:
    1. Start date: 6/14/21
    2. End date: 9/17/21
    3. Any other schedule would require written approval by the Summer Block Field Liaison and the Director of Field
    4. Overall the goal is to complete the hours required for summer block in a manner, which fits the placement site, the field instructor, the student, and the academic expectations. Agencies often need to modify the days and hours of field placement during the early September weeks to accommodate regular 1st or 2nd year internship students beginning their placements. Your field liaison will work with you around the schedule modifications that may be needed at your unique site during the last weeks of summer block
  5. The student’s Learning Agreement is due by the end of the 2nd week in
  6. There will be two (2) Evaluation Periods for the Summer Block Placement:
    1. there will be two (2) written evaluations of the student by the Field Instructor
      1. the first Evaluation is due mid-way through the placement, by the end of July,
      2. the second Evaluation is due the week prior to the last week of placement;
    2. the student will be expected to do two (2) Self Evaluations at the same time intervals as above;
    3. the Field Liaison will make two (2) placement visits during the Summer Block Placement.
  7. Because these placements are full time, compared to the regular academic year in which placements are 2-3 days per week, the supervision requirement for placement can be modified. These include:
    1. Students will be expected to receive up to 1-3 hours of individual supervision per week;
    2. 1 hour minimum of this supervision should be with the primary supervisor;
    3. the remaining supervision may be provided on an individual basis by one or more preceptors;
    4. group supervision-
      1. Good Supervision Guidelines
        1. group supervision cannot be used to replace the 1 hour of required primary individual supervision,
        2. group supervision can be used for all or part of the supervision above the 1 hour of individual supervision,
        3. group supervision may be designed for supervision and consultation purposes, a clinical or program team meeting in which there is a supervisory leader, seminars designed to improve skills or knowledge that enhances the student’s ability to engage in the work, and in some cases staff meetings or administrative meetings,
        4. students may be included in groups which include supervisors, staff, and trainees from other disciplines,
        5. the supervisory plan should be documented in the Learning Agreement and will be approved by the Summer Block Field Liaison
  8. The Field Instructor and the student will have access to UCLA IPT (Intern Placement Tracking) for documentation and evaluation forms.
  9. The Summer Block Field Instructor can access a copy of the Field Education Handbook online.
  10. Summer Block students must be enrolled in summer sessions.  Students must enroll in SOC WEL 402 ABC (12 units).  Estimated tuition cost $4,754.

Looking Ahead

Contact

Send Carmen a Question