Leobardo Estrada

AREAS OF INTEREST

Ethnic Communities—Latino American
Geographic Information Systems
Race and Ethnicity

SELECTED BOOKS & PUBLICATIONS

The Dynamic Demographic Mosaic Called America: Implications for Education
Estrada, L. "The Dynamic Demographic Mosaic Called America: Implications for Education," Education and Urban Society 25, no. 3 (1993).
The Changing Profile of Mexican America, A Sourcebook for Policy Makers
Estrada, L. The Changing Profile of Mexican America, A Sourcebook for Policy Makers. Claremont, CA: Tomas Rivera Center, 1986.
The Politics of the Census: A Reflection of the Dilemmas in U.S. Society
Estrada, L. "The Politics of the Census: A Reflection of the Dilemmas in U.S. Society," Proceedings of the Joint Canada-United States Conference on Measurement of Ethnicity. Washington, DC: GPO, September, 1993
Associate Professor of Urban Planning
Urban Planning
Ph.D. in Sociology, Florida State University
(310) 825-6574 x 56574

Professor Estrada's areas of expertise include ethnic and racial demographic trends, particularly in the Latino population of the southwestern United States, inner city redevelopment, and social policy analysis and research methods.   He twice has been asked to provide his knowledge on methodologies related to ethnic and racial groups to the U.S. Bureau of the Census, serving as Special Assistant to the Chief of the Population Division and as Staff Assistant to the Deputy Director.   He has participated in numerous national studies, including an evaluation of the U.S. Standard of Live Birth for the U.S. National Center for Health Statistics.   

In recognition of his expertise, Dr. Estrada serves on advisory boards to numerous non-profit organizations, including the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials, the Pew Charitable Trust's Global Stewardship Initiative, the Urban Institute and the Southern California Association of Governments.   He also has been a consultant to such groups as the Ford Foundation and the Southwest Voter Registration and Education Project.  

In Los Angeles, he has served on the board of Rebuild LA and as a member of the Christopher Commission, whose recommendations in the wake of the 1991 Rodney King beating have become the basis of the ongoing reform of the Los Angeles Police Department. He also played a central role in the 1990 redistricting of the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors, which resulted in the election of the county's first Latino supervisor in more than a century.

Leobardo Estrada

Headshot: 
First Name: 
Leobardo
Last Name: 
Estrada
Position: 
Associate Professor of Urban Planning
Degrees: 
Ph.D. in Sociology, Florida State University
Bio: 

Professor Estrada's areas of expertise include ethnic and racial demographic trends, particularly in the Latino population of the southwestern United States, inner city redevelopment, and social policy analysis and research methods.   He twice has been asked to provide his knowledge on methodologies related to ethnic and racial groups to the U.S. Bureau of the Census, serving as Special Assistant to the Chief of the Population Division and as Staff Assistant to the Deputy Director.   He has participated in numerous national studies, including an evaluation of the U.S. Standard of Live Birth for the U.S. National Center for Health Statistics.   

In recognition of his expertise, Dr. Estrada serves on advisory boards to numerous non-profit organizations, including the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials, the Pew Charitable Trust's Global Stewardship Initiative, the Urban Institute and the Southern California Association of Governments.   He also has been a consultant to such groups as the Ford Foundation and the Southwest Voter Registration and Education Project.  

In Los Angeles, he has served on the board of Rebuild LA and as a member of the Christopher Commission, whose recommendations in the wake of the 1991 Rodney King beating have become the basis of the ongoing reform of the Los Angeles Police Department. He also played a central role in the 1990 redistricting of the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors, which resulted in the election of the county's first Latino supervisor in more than a century.

Phone Number: 
(310) 825-6574 x 56574
Email Address: 
For Admins Only