Juan C. Jauregui

Juan C. Jauregui, MSW, MPH is a first-year doctoral student in the Department of Social Welfare at the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs. His research interests are focused around addressing LGBTQ+ mental health inequities both in the U.S. and low- and middle-income countries, specifically by targeting LGBTQ+ minority stressors through structural-level interventions. Juan is passionate about conducting research using a community-based participatory research approach to ensure that decision-making power is shared with community members throughout the research process. 

Before entering the doctoral program at UCLA, Juan worked with the Resilience + Resistance Collective at the University of Michigan School of Public Health where he was involved in LGBTQ+ mental health projects in the U.S., Kenya, and Zambia. He also worked with the Heinz C. Prechter Bipolar Research Program at Michigan Medicine where he focused on examining health inequities for LGB people with bipolar disorder. Juan’s previous professional experiences also include working as a Research Associate for the UCLA Adolescent Trials Network and as a Crisis Worker for a national suicide hotline. 

Juan earned his BS in Psychobiology from UCLA in 2017 and Master of Social Work and Master of Public Health from the University of Michigan in 2021.

Selected Publications: 

Jauregui, J. C., Rucah, C., Crawford, J., Jadwin-Cakmak, L., Concehla, C., Onyango, D. P., Harper, G. W. (In Press). Experiences of Violence and Mental Health Concerns among Sexual and Gender Minority Adults in Western Kenya. LGBT Health.

Loeb, T. , Jauregui, J. C., Wyatt, G. E., Chin, D., Hamilton, A., Zhang, M., Holloway, I. W., Patron, D. J. (2021). Does Gender Role Conflict Moderate the Relationship between Lifetime Adversity and HIV Stigma in a Community Sample of HIV-Seropositive Black Men? Journal of Men and Masculinities. 

Lynn Zimmerman

Lynn Zimmerman has over 30 years of LCSW experience working in Los Angeles.

Her interests include mental health issues with a focus on early childhood mental health (Birth to Five), children and families, trauma, and women’s issues. She has a special interest in attachment and neurodevelopmental issues, assessment, treatment and reflective supervision.

 

Lynn has worked as a Clinical Mental Health Supervisor with Los Angeles Department of Mental Health (LA DMH) and Community Mental Health clinics including: Providence Saint John’s Child and Family Development Center (CFDC) and Didi Hirsch Community Mental Health Clinic. She worked as a Clinical Supervisor and Program Coordinator with the Child Abuse Prevention, Intervention and Treatment Program (CAPIT) and Partnerships for Families (PFF) with Providence Saint John’s / CFDC and Child Alert Program with Didi Hirsch Community Mental Health Center.

Lynn has additionally holds a Master Public Administration from University of San Francisco.

 

Lynn specialized in psychotherapy and clinical supervision with adults, young adults, adolescents, birth to five and also with parents focusing on postpartum and perinatal issues, attachment, trauma, anxiety and depression.

 

Currently Lynn has a private practice and offers clinical supervision and consultation to agencies, and licensed and unlicensed clinicians. She is endorsed by the California Center for Infant-Family and Early Childhood Mental Health as an Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health Specialist (IECMHS) and as a Reflective Practice Facilitator II (RPF-II

 

www.LynnZimmerman.com

Javier Garcia-Perez

Javier Garcia-Perez is a Doctoral Student in the department of Social Welfare in the Luskin School of Public Affairs. He is a Eugene V. Cota-Robles Fellow, a fellowship for doctoral students from underrepresented backgrounds. Broadly, Javier’s research interests include LGBTQ+ Latinx youth mental health, LGBTQ+ Latinx experiences, Latinx mental health, identity-based trauma and mental health, trauma, LGBTQ+ mental health, intersectionality, youth development, multiple minority identity and inequities. The specific aim of his research is to better understand the lived realities or LGBTQ+ Latinx youth at the intersection of their multiple identities and the reality of their daily experiences.  

Prior to UCLA, Javier obtained his BA in Chicana/Chicano Studies from the University of California, Davis and completed his MA in Sociocultural Anthropology from Columbia University. He received a dual MSW/MS in Nonprofit Leadership from the University of Pennsylvania, School of Social Policy & Practice (SP2). Previously, he served as the program director for an ExpandED learning Time program working to achieve educational equity for low-income and marginalized middle school students in Harlem, New York.  Javier has served as a member in the Doctoral Student Committee for the Society of Social Work and Research (SSWR) and as the doctoral representative for the Social Welfare department Doctoral Committee. 

Currently, he is working on projects around mental health disparities, inequities, multiple minority identities, and identity-based trauma. 

Twitter: @GarciaPerezJavi

PUBLICATIONS

Garcia-Perez, J. (2020) Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer + Latinx youth mental health disparities: A systematic review, Journal of Gay & Lesbian Social Services, 32:4, 440-478, DOI: 10.1080/10538720.2020.1764896

Garcia-Perez, J. (2016). The Fear of Writing: How White Supremacy Normalized My Cognitive Distortions. Collectivist Journal Volume One, School of Social Policy & Practice, University of Pennsylvania. https://www.sp2.upenn.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/Collectivist-SP2-Journal-2016.pdf