Dana Cuff

Dana Cuff is a professor, author, and scholar in architecture and urbanism at the University of California, Los Angeles where she is also the founding director of cityLAB, a think tank that explores design innovations in the emerging metropolis (www.cityLAB.aud.ucla.edu).

Since receiving her Ph.D. in Architecture from UC Berkeley, Cuff has published and lectured widely about postwar Los Angeles, modern American urbanism, the architectural profession, affordable housing, and spatially embedded computing. Two books have been particularly important: Architecture: the Story of Practice which remains an influential text about the culture of the design profession, and The Provisional City, a study of residential architecture’s role in transforming Los Angeles over the past century.

Her urban and architectural research now span across continents to Sweden, China, Japan, and Mexico. In 2013 and 2016, Cuff received major, multi-year awards from the Mellon Foundation for the Urban Humanities Initiative, bringing design and the humanities together at UCLA.

Link to Professor Cuff’s Citylab website:  http://www.citylab.aud.ucla.edu/cuff.html

 

Matthew Drennan

Matthew Drennan has been a Visiting Professor in the department since 2004.   He is an Emeritus Professor, City and Regional Planning, Cornell University.

His recent book “Income Inequality: Why It Matters and Why Most Economists Didn’t Notice” was published by Yale University Press in November, 2015. It was reviewed in the Sunday New York Times Book Review, December 20, 2015.

His current research focuses on how minimum wage increases in big cities affect consumption expenditures of low-wage workers in the metropolitan area. Most of his past work has been in urban and regional economics. In the “Encyclopedia of New York City” he wrote the history of the city’s economy from colonial times to the present.

Articles:

“Do Agglomeration Economies Decay over Short Distances? Are They Stable in the Face of Shocks? Evidence From Manhattan,” International Journal of Urban Sciences, Vol. 22, No. 1, 2018

“Does Public Transit Use Enhance the Economic Efficiency of Urban Areas?” with Charles M. Brecher, Journal of Transport and Land Use, Vol. 5, No. 3, 2012.

“Measuring Urban Agglomeration Economies with Office Rents,” with Hugh Kelly, Journal of Economic Geography, Vol. 11, No. 3, 2011.

“Falling Behind: California’s Interior Metropolitan Areas,” with Michael Manville,Berkeley Planning Journal, Vol. 21, 2008.

“Economics: Diminishing Marginal Utility” Challenge, September-October, 2006

“Possible Sources of Wage Divergence among Metropolitan Areas of the United States,” Urban Studies, Vol. 42, No. 9, 2005.

“Unit Root Tests of Sigma Income Convergence Across U.S. Metropolitan Areas,” with Jose Lobo and Deborah Strumsky, Journal of Economic Geography, Vol. 4, No. 5, 2004.

“Transition and Renewal; The Emergence of a Diverse Upstate Economy,”with Rolf Pendall and Susan Christopherson. Center on Urban and Metropolitan Policy, the Brookings Institution, January, 2004.

“The Economic Benefits of Public Investment in Transportation: A Review of Recent Literature,” Journal of Planning Education and Research, Vol. 22, No. 3, 2003.

“Sectoral Shares, Specialization, and Metropolitan Wages in the United States, 1969-1996,” with Shannon Larsen, Jose Lobo, Deborah Strumsky, and Wahyu Utomo. Urban Studies, Vol. 39, June, 2002.

Book Chapters:

“What’s Wrong With Los Angeles, and What Could Fix It?” California Policy Options, Daniel J.B. Mitchell, ed., UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs, 2017.

“Economy,” The encyclopedia of New York City, 2nd Edition, Ed. Kenneth T. Jackson, New Haven:  Yale University Press, 2010.

“The Economic Cost of Disasters- Permanent or Ephemeral?” in Economic Costs and Consequences of Terrorism, Peter Gordon and Harry Richardson, eds, Edward Elgar, 2007.

Eric Avila

Eric Avila’s research interests include (1) History: 20th century, United States, urban, cultural, History of Los Angeles and the U.S. West, historiography; (2) Ethnic Studies: Chicano Studies, race and racialization, spatial segregation, identity formation, Ethnic Communities – Latino American; and (3) Architecture and urban planning: built environment studies, Los Angeles/Southern California.

His research has won various awards and prizes, including the recent inclusion of his article, “Popular Culture in the Age of the White Flight: Film Noir Disneyland, and the Cold War (Sub)Urban Imaginary” published in the Journal of Urban History, within a new publication by the Organization of American Historians featuring the ten best articles in American history written between the summers of 2005 and 2005. He has begun research for a book entitled, The Folklore of the Freeway: A Cultural History of Highway Construction.

SELECTED BOOKS & PUBLICATIONS

The Chicano Studies Reader: An Anthology of Aztlán
Noriega, Chon, Avila, Eric, Sandoval, Chela, Pérez Torres, and Dávalos, Mary Karen, 2001, The Chicano Studies Reader: An Anthology of Aztlán, 1970-2000 (Los Angeles: UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center).

Popular Culture in the Age of White Flight: Fear and Fantasy in Suburban Los Angeles
Avila, Eric, 2004, Popular Culture in the Age of White Flight: Fear and Fantasy in Suburban Los Angeles (University of California Press).

Popular Culture in the Age of White Flight: Film Noir, Disneyland and the Cold War (Sub)Urban Imaginary
Avila, Eric, 2004, “Popular Culture in the Age of White Flight: Film Noir, Disneyland and the Cold War (Sub)Urban Imaginary,” Journal of Urban History (Sage Publications).

Evelyn Blumenberg

Evelyn Blumenberg is the Director of the Lewis Center for Regional Policy Studies and an Urban Planning professor within the Luskin School of Public Affairs.

Her research examines the effects of urban structure — the spatial location of residents, employment, and services — on economic outcomes for low-wage workers, and on the role of planning and policy in shaping the spatial structure of cities.

Professor Blumenberg’s recent projects include analyses of trends in transit ridership, gender and travel behavior, low-wage workers and the changing commute, and the relationship between automobile ownership and employment outcomes among the poor.

Professor Blumenberg was honored in 2014 as a White House Champion of Change for her research on the links between transportation access, employment, and poverty.

Professor Blumenberg holds a bachelor’s degree in political science from the University of California, Berkeley, and a master’s degree and Ph.D. in urban planning from the University of California, Los Angeles.

She teaches courses on planning history and theory, research design, poverty and inequality, transportation and poverty, and urban policy.

RECENT WORK

Journal Articles

1) Giamarino, Chris, Evelyn Blumenberg, and Madeline Brozen (forthcoming). “Who lives in vehicles and why? Understanding vehicular homelessness in Los Angeles,” Housing Policy Debate. https://doi.org/10.1080/10511482.2022.2117990

2) Blumenberg, Evelyn and Madeline Wander (forthcoming). “Housing affordability and commute distance,” Urban Geography. https://doi.org/10.1080/02723638.2022.2087319

3) Blumenberg, Evelyn and Fariba Siddiq (forthcoming). “Commute Distance and Jobs-Housing Fit,” Transportation. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11116-02210264-1

4) Giamarino, Chris, Madeline Brozen, and Evelyn Blumenberg (2023). “Planning for and against vehicular homelessness: Spatial trends and determinants of vehicular dwelling in Los Angeles,” Journal of the American Planning Association, 89(1): 80-92.

5) Schouten, Andrew, Evelyn Blumenberg, and Martin Wachs (2022, December). “Driving, Residential Location, and Employment Outcomes among Older Adults,” Journal of Applied Gerontology, 41(12): 2447-2458. https://doi.org/10.1177/07334648221120081

6) Blumenberg, Evelyn, Andrew Schouten, and Anne Brown (2022). “Who’s in the Driver’s Seat? Gender and the Division of Car Use in Auto-Deficit Households,” Transportation Research Part A, 162: 14-26.

7) Manville, Michael, Brian D. Taylor, Evelyn Blumenberg, and Andrew Schouten (2022). “Vehicle Access and Falling Transit Ridership: Evidence from Southern California,” Transportation. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11116-021-10245-w

8) Schouten, Andrew, Martin Wachs, Evelyn Blumenberg, and Hannah King (2022). “Cohort Analysis of Driving Cessation and Limitation Among Older Adults,” Transportation. 49: 841-865. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11116-021-10196-2

9) Schouten, Andrew, Evelyn Blumenberg, Martin Wachs, and Hannah King (2022). “Keys to the Car. Driving Cessation and Residential Location Among Older Adults,” Journal of the American Planning Association, 88(1): 3-14.

10) Schouten, Andrew, Evelyn Blumenberg, and Brian D. Taylor (2021). “Rating the Composition: Deconstructing the Demand-side Effects on Transit Use Changes in California,” Travel Behaviour and Society, 25: 18-26.

11) Blumenberg, Evelyn, Miriam Pinski, Lilly A. Nhan, and May C. Wang (2021). “Regional Differences in the Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Food Sufficiency in California, April-July, 2020: Implications for Food Programs and Policies,” Public Health Nutrition. 24(11): 3442-3450, doi:10.1017/S1368980021001889

12) Blumenberg, Evelyn and Hannah King (2021). “Jobs-Housing Balance Re-Re-Visited,” Journal of the American Planning Association, 87(4): 484-496, doi:10.1080/01944363.2021.1880961

13) Blumenberg, Evelyn, Julene Paul and Greg Pierce (2021). “Travel in the Digital Age: Vehicle Ownership and Technology-Facilitated Accessibility,” Transport Policy, 103: 86-94.

14) Schouten, Andrew, Brian Taylor, and Evelyn Blumenberg (2021). “Who’s on Board? Examining the Changing Characteristics of Transit Riders Using Latent Profile Analysis,” Journal of the Transportation Research Board, 2675(7): 1-10, https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0361198120987225

15) Pollard, Jane, Evelyn Blumenberg, and Stephen Brumbaugh (2021). “Driven to Debt: Social Reproduction and (Auto)mobility in Los Angeles,” Annals of the Association of American Geographers, 111(5): 1445-1461, doi:10.1080/24694452.2020.1813541

Paul Ong

Professor Ong has done research on the labor market status of minorities and immigrants, displaced high-tech workers, work and spatial/transportation mismatch, and environmental justice. He is currently engaged in several projects, including an analysis of the relationship between sustainability and equity, the racial wealth gap, and the role of urban structures on the reproduction of inequality.

Previous research projects have included studies of the impact of defense cuts on California’s once-dominant aerospace industry, the impact of immigration on the employment status of young African Americans, and the influence of car ownership and subsidized housing on welfare usage.

Dr. Ong is the Director of the Center for Neighborhood Knowledge and editor of AAPI Nexus, and has served as an advisor to the U.S. Bureau of the Census, and to the California Department of Social Services and the state Department of Employment Development, as well as the Wellness Foundation and the South Coast Air Quality Management District.

He received a master’s in urban planning from the University of Washington, and a Ph.D. in Economics, University of California, Berkeley. Along with his quantitative research, his professional practice includes teaching and applying visual forms of communication.

SELECTED BOOKS & PUBLICATIONS

Set-Aside Contracting in S.B.A.’s 8(A) Program
Paul Ong, Review of Black Political Economy Vol 28, No. 3, Winter 2001, pp. 59-71.

Car Ownership and Welfare-to-Work
Paul M. Ong, Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, Vol. 21, No. 2, Spring 2002, pp. 255-268.

Impacts of Affirmative Action: Policies and Consequences in California
Paul Ong, editor,  Alta Mira Press, 1999.

The State of Asian Pacific America: Transforming Race Relations
Paul M. Ong, editor, Asian Pacific American Public Policy Institute, LEAP and UCLA AASC, Los Angeles, CA, 2000.

The New Asian Immigration in Los Angeles and Global Restructuring
Paul Ong, Edna Bonacich, and Lucie Cheng, editors, Temple University Press, 1994.