Fernando Torres-Gil

Fernando M. Torres-Gil’s multifaceted career spans the academic, professional, and policy arenas.  He is a Professor of Social Welfare and Public Policy at UCLA, an Adjunct Professor of Gerontology at USC, and Director of the UCLA Center for Policy Research on Aging.  He has served as Associate Dean and Acting Dean at the UCLA School of Public Affairs, and most recently Chair of the Social Welfare Department.  He has written six books and over l00 publications, including The New Aging: Politics and Change in America (1992) and Lessons from Three Nations, Volumes I and II (2007).  His academic contributions have earned him membership in the prestigious Academies of Public Administration, Gerontology and Social Insurance.  His research spans important topics of health and long-term care, disability, entitlement reform, and the politics of aging.

Professor Torres-Gil is more than an academic.  He has an impressive portfolio of public service and national and international recognition as a leading spokesperson on demographics, aging, and public policy.  He earned his first presidential appointment in 1978 when President Jimmy Carter appointed him to the Federal Council on Aging.  He was selected as a White House Fellow and served under Joseph Califano, then Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (HEW), and continued as a Special Assistant to the subsequent Secretary of HEW, Patricia Harris.  He was appointed (with Senate Confirmation) by President Bill Clinton as the first-ever U.S. Assistant Secretary on Aging in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS). As the Clinton Administration’s chief advocate on aging, Torres-Gil played a key role in promoting the importance of the issues of aging, long-term care and disability, community services for the elderly, and baby boomer preparation for retirement.  He served under HHS Secretary Donna Shalala, managing the Administration on Aging and organizing the 1995 White House Conference on Aging, in addition to serving as a member of the President’s Welfare Reform Working Group.

In 2010 he received his third presidential appointment (with Senate Confirmation) when President Barack Obama appointed him as Vice Chair of the National Council on Disability, an independent federal agency that reports to the Congress and White House on federal matters related to disability policy.  During his public service in Washington, D.C., he also served as Staff Director of the U.S. House Select Committee on Aging under his mentor, Congressman Edward R. Roybal.

At the local level, Torres-Gil has served as the Vice President of the Los Angeles City Planning Commission and a member of the Harbor and Taxi Commissions for the city of Los Angeles.  He currently serves Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa as an appointed member of the Board of Airport Commissioners.  At the state level, he was appointed by former Governor Gray Davis to the Governor’s Blue Ribbon Task Force on Veterans’ Homes and by Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger as a delegate to the 2005 White House Conference on Aging.

He continues to provide important leadership in philanthropy and non-profit organizations as a board member of the AARP Foundation, and he is a former board member of The California Endowment, National Steinbeck Center in Salinas, California and the Los Angeles Chinatown Service Center.

Dr. Torres-Gil was born and raised in Salinas, California, the son of migrant farm workers.  He earned his A.A. in Political Science at Hartnell Community College (1968), a B.A. with honors in Political Science from San Jose State University (1970), and an M.S.W. (1972) and Ph.D. (1976) in Social Policy, Planning and Research from the Heller Graduate School in Social Policy and Management at Brandeis University.

SELECTED BOOKS & PUBLICATIONS

California, Where Brown and Gray America Collide
TIME magazine, June 24, 2015

Policy, Politics and Aging: Crossroads in the 1990s
Torres-Gil, F. (1998) in J.S. Steckenrider and T.M. Parrott (Eds.), New Directions in Old-Age Politics, Albany: State University of New York Press, 75-87

The New Aging: Politics and Change in America
Torres-Gil, F. The New Aging: Politics and Change in America. Westport, CT: Auburn House, 1992

The Emerging Nexus of Aging and Diversity: Implications for Public Policy and Entitlement Reform
Torres-Gil, F. and Bickson-Moga, K., Elder’s Advisor: The Journal of Elder Law and Post-Retirement Planning, Vol. 4, No. 1, Summer 2002

Social Policy and Aging
Torres-Gil, F. and Villa, V., in J. Midgley, M. Tracy and M. Livermore (Eds.), The Handbook of Social Policy, 2000, Sage Publications

The Art of Aging Well: Lessons From Three Nations
Carmel, S., C. Morse, and F. Torres-Gil (Eds.). Volume I. Amityville, New York: Baywood Publishing Company, Inc., In Press

The Art of Caring for Older Adults
Carmel, S., C. Morse, and F. Torres-Gil (Eds.). Volume II. Amityville, New York: Baywood Publishing Company, Inc., In Press

Vinit Mukhija

Vinit Mukhija is a Professor and Department Chair of Urban Planning in the Luskin School of Public Affairs at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA).

His research focuses on informal housing and slums in developing countries and “Third World-like” housing conditions (including colonias, unpermitted trailer parks, and illegal garage apartments) in the United States. He is particularly interested in understanding the nature and necessity of informal housing, and strategies for upgrading and improving living conditions in unregulated housing. His work also examines how planners and urban designers in both developing and developed countries can learn from the everyday and informal city.

Four research questions and objectives guide his research. First, what is the nature of informal housing, including its prevalence, characteristics, heterogeneity, determinants, rationale, advantages and disadvantages? Second, how can living conditions within slums and informal housing be improved, and what is the role of different institutional actors, including state, civil society, and market actors, within this process? Third, how should conventional planning and urban design approaches change in response to the prevalence of informality, particularly informal housing? Fourth, how do policy ideas in housing and land development travel and spread in a globalized world? The broad objective of his work is to help identify and improve strategies for increasing access to decent housing among the urban poor as a planning pathway to social and spatial justice.

Professor Mukhija’s current and past major projects include research on slum upgrading and redevelopment in Mumbai (Bombay), India; research on colonias, infrastructure-poor neighborhoods, and unpermitted trailer parks in California; evaluation of inclusionary housing requirements in Southern California; research on legal and illegal garage apartments or “Backyard Homes” in Los Angeles as a form of affordable housing and stealth density; and research on the nature of informality in U.S. cities. He is the author of one book, Squatters as Developers? Slum Redevelopment in Mumbai (Ashgate, 2003), and co-editor of a recently published volume, The Informal American City: Beyond Taco Trucks and Day Labor(MIT Press 2014, with Anastasia Loukaitou-Sideris).

Professor Mukhija trained as an urban planner (Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology), urban designer (MUD, University of Hong Kong), and architect (M.Arch., University of Texas, Austin, and B.Arch., the School of Planning and Architecture, New Delhi). He also has professional experience as an urban designer and physical planner in India, Hong Kong, and Kuwait with new town design proposals and projects in India, China, and the Middle East. Before coming to UCLA he worked as a post-doctoral researcher for the Fannie Mae Foundation in Washington, D.C., and developed neighborhood upgrading and renewal strategies for American cities. Some of his past projects have been funded by the Haynes Foundation, the California Policy Research Center, the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy, the United Nations Development Program (UNDP), and the World Bank.

Professor Mukhija has won multiple awards for his teaching at UCLA (2007, 2009 and 2013), and his teaching portfolio includes courses on informality in U.S. cities, housing policies in the majority world, and planning studios. Recent neighborhoods for his studios have included Downtown Los Angeles (2014), Atwater Village (2012), East Hollywood (2011), the City of Bell (2010), East Los Angeles (2009), Pacoima (2008), and Hyde Park (2007).

Professor Mukhija has also advised the newly formed Indian Institute of Human Settlements, Bangalore, on course and curriculum development. His other community and public service contributions include membership on the Board of Directors of the Los Angeles Area Neighborhood Initiative (LANI), a non-profit focused on community-based urban revitalization strategies; service as the Co-Chair of the Global Planning Educators Interest Group (GPEIG) within the Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning (ACSP); and as an editorial advisory board member of the Journal of the American Planning Associationand the Journal of Planning Education and Research.

 

Books

The Informal American City: Beyond Taco Trucks and Day Labor
Mukhija, V. and A. Loukaitou-Sideris, 2014, Cambridge, MIT Press.
[Reviewed in Planning (2014), Journal of the American Planning Association (2014),and Environment and Urbanization (2015, online)]

Squatters as Developers? Slum Redevelopment in Mumbai, Ashgate, Aldershot, England
Mukhija, V., 2003, Studies in Development Geography Series of King’s College and School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London
[Reviewed in European Journal of Development Research (2005), Habitat International (2005), Urban Studies (2005), Architectural Science Review (2004), and Journal of the American Planning Association(2004)]

 

Journal Papers & Book Chapters

Reading the Informal City: Why and How to Deepen Planners’ Understanding of Informality
Mukhija, V. and A. Loukaitou-Sideris, Journal of Planning Education and Research.

From Neglect to Action: Responding to Informality through Urban Design
Loukaitou-Sideris, A. and V. Mukhija, Journal of Urban Design.

Learning from Invisible Cities: The Interplay and Dialogue of Order and Disorder
Mukhija, V., Environment and Planning A.

Rehousing Mumbai: Formalizing Slum Land Markets through Redevelopment in Informal Real Estate Markets
Mukhija, V., Editors E. Birch, S. Chattaraj, and S. Wachter, University of Pennsylvania Press, Philadelphia.

The Tradeoffs of Inclusionary Zoning: What Do We Know and What Do We Need to Know?
Mukhija, V., A. Das, L. Regus, and S. Slovin Tsay, 2015, Planning, Practice & Research, Vol. 30(2), 222-235.

Resident-Owned, Informal Mobile Home Communities in Rural California: Lessons from Rancho Don Antonio, Coachella Valley
Mukhija, V. and D. Mason, 2015, Housing Policy Debate, Vol. 25(1), 179-194.

The Value of Incremental Development and Design in Affordable Housing
Mukhija, V., 2014, Cityscape: A Journal of Policy Development and Research, Vol. 16(2), 11-20.

The Importance of Design in Affordable Housing: Lessons from Mutual Self-Help Housing in California
Mukhija, V. and J. Scott-Railton, 2013, Housing Policy Debate, Vol. 23(4), 765-780.

Reluctant Cities, Colonias and Municipal Underbounding in the U.S.: Can Cities be Convinced to Annex Poor Enclaves?
Mukhija, V. and D. Mason, 2013, Urban Studies, Vol. 50(14), 2959-2975.

Cities with Slums
Mukhija, V., 2012, in The Oxford Handbook of Urban Planning. Editors R. Weber and R. Crane, pp. 524-538, Oxford University Press, New York.

The 1970 Centers Concept Plan for Los Angeles
Mukhija, V., 2012, in Planning Los Angeles. Editor D. Sloane, pp. 36-44, APA Planners Press, Chicago.

Informal Housing: Colonias in the United States
Mukhija, V., 2012, in The International Encyclopedia of Housing and Home. Editor S. J. Smith, with M. Elsinga. L. F. O’Mahony, O. S. Eng, and S. Wachter, Elsevier, Oxford.

Urban Design for a Planet of Informal Cities
Mukhija, V., 2011, in Companion to Urban Design. Editors T. Banerjee and A. Loukaitou-Sideris, pp. 574-584, Routledge, New York.

N of One plus Some: An Alternative Strategy for Conducting Single Case Research
Mukhija, V., 2010, Journal of Planning Education and Research, Vol. 29(4), 416-426.

Can Inclusionary Zoning Be an Effective and Efficient Housing Policy? Evidence from Los Angeles and Orange Counties
Mukhija, V., L. Regus, S. Slovin, and A. Das, 2010, Journal of Urban Affairs, Vol. 32(2), 229-252.

Agricultural Prosperity, Rural Poverty and California’s Colonias
Mukhija, V., 2010, in The Colonias Reader: Economy, Housing and Public Health in U.S.-Mexico Border Colonias. Editors A. J. Donelson and A. X. Esparaza, pp. 72-85, University of Arizona Press, Tucson.

Property Readjustment in Mumbai: Tenement Redevelopment
Mukhija, V., 2009, in Urban Planning Methods: Land Readjustment and Urban Re-Development Projects (in English & Portuguese). Editor F.F. de Souza, pp. 161-165 (English edition), Japan International Cooperation Agency and Municipal Planning Secretariat of Sao Paulo.

How Is Housing Financed? The Case of a Group of Tenants Who Became Property Developers in Mumbai, India
Mukhija, V., 2008, in From Negations to Negotiations: Solving the Puzzles of Development. Editor P. Maiti, Pragun Publishers, New Delhi.

What’s in a Name? A Critique of Colonias in the United States
Mukhija, V. and P. Monkkonen, 2007, International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, Vol. 31(2), 475-488.

Federal Colonias Policy in California: Too Broad and Too Narrow
Mukhija, V. and P. Monkkonen, 2006, Housing Policy Debate, Vol. 17(4), 755-780.

Property Readjustment and a Tenants’ Cooperative in Mumbai: Some Lessons and Questions
Mukhija, V., 2006, Environment and Planning A, Vol. 38(11), 2157-2171.

Quantity versus Quality in Off-Street Parking Requirements
Mukhija, V. and D. Shoup, 2006, Journal of the American Planning Association, Vol. 72(3), 296-308.

Challenges for International Development Planning: Preliminary Lessons from the Case of the Cities Alliance
Mukhija, V., 2006, Cities: The International Journal of Urban Policy and Planning, Vol. 23(1), 56-62.

Decentralized Conflict
Mukhija, V., 2006, in The Mumbai Reader. Editors R. Mehrotra, P. Joshi, P. Shetty, and B. Menezes, pp. 202-219, the International Architecture Exhibition at the Venice Biennale, Urban Design Research Institute, Mumbai.

Collective Action and Property Rights: A Planner’s Critical Look at the Dogma of Private Property
Mukhija, V., 2005, International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, Vol. 29(4), 972-983.

The Contradictions in Enabling Private Developers of Affordable Housing: A Cautionary Case from Ahmedabad, India
Mukhija, V., 2005, in Urban Development Debates in the New Millennium (Volume IV). Editor K.R. Gupta, pp. 48-71, Atlantic Publishers and Distributors, New Delhi.

How Is Housing Financed? The Case of a Group of Tenants Who Became Property Developers in Mumbai, India
Mukhija, V., 2004, International Development Planning Review, Vol. 26(3), 257-274.

The Contradictions in Enabling Private Developers of Affordable Housing: A Cautionary Case from Ahmedabad, India
Mukhija, V., 2004, Urban Studies, Vol. 41(11), 2231-2244.

An Analytical Framework for Urban Upgrading: Property Rights, Property Values and Physical Attributes
Mukhija, V., 2002. Habitat International, Vol. 26(4), 553-570.

New Houses for Old in Mumbai: An Attractive but Problematic Strategy
Mukhija, V., 2002, International Development Planning Review, Vol. 24(2), 161-176.

Enabling Slum Redevelopment in Mumbai: Policy Paradox in Practice
Mukhija, V., 2001, Housing Studies, Vol. 16(6), 791-806.

Upgrading Housing Settlements in Developing Countries: The Impact of Existing Physical Conditions
Mukhija, V., 2001, Cities: The International Journal of Urban Policy and Planning, Vol. 18(4), 213-222.

Institutional Pluralism and Housing Delivery: A Case of Unforeseen Conflicts in Mumbai, India
Sanyal, B. and V. Mukhija, 2001, World Development, Vol. 29(12), 2043-2057.

Dana Cuff

Dana Cuff is a professor, author, and scholar in architecture and urbanism at the University of California, Los Angeles where she is also the founding director of cityLAB, a think tank that explores design innovations in the emerging metropolis (www.cityLAB.aud.ucla.edu).

Since receiving her Ph.D. in Architecture from UC Berkeley, Cuff has published and lectured widely about postwar Los Angeles, modern American urbanism, the architectural profession, affordable housing, and spatially embedded computing. Two books have been particularly important: Architecture: the Story of Practice which remains an influential text about the culture of the design profession, and The Provisional City, a study of residential architecture’s role in transforming Los Angeles over the past century.

Her urban and architectural research now span across continents to Sweden, China, Japan, and Mexico. In 2013 and 2016, Cuff received major, multi-year awards from the Mellon Foundation for the Urban Humanities Initiative, bringing design and the humanities together at UCLA.

Link to Professor Cuff’s Citylab website:  http://www.citylab.aud.ucla.edu/cuff.html

 

Joel Aberbach

Joel D. Aberbach is Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Political Science and Public Policy, and Director of the Center for American Politics and Public Policy, at the University of California, Los Angeles. He is the author of Keeping a Watchful Eye: The Politics of Congressional Oversight (Brookings, 1990), co-author, with Bert A. Rockman, of In the Web of Politics: Three Decades of the U.S. Federal Executive (Brookings 2000), co-author, with Robert D. Putnam and Bert A. Rockman, of Bureaucrats and Politicians in Western Democracies (Harvard, 1981) and, with the late Jack L. Walker, co-author of Race in the City (Little, Brown, 1973). He is also the author of numerous journal articles and book chapters.

His research ranges widely over topics in American and comparative politics, with emphasis on legislative-executive relations and broader issues of executive politics and policy-making. Over the years, he has trained scores of administrators as an instructor in public policy programs at Michigan and UCLA, and he has also served as a consultant to organizations such as the Government Accountability Office, the Carnegie Commission on Science, Technology and Government, and the Commission on the Operation of the Senate.

Aberbach is currently Co-Chair of the Research Committee on Structure and Organization of Government of the International Political Science Association and Co-Chair of the Commission on the Executive Branch convened by the Annenberg Foundation Trust’s Institutions of Democracy Project. A volume from this project, titled Institutions of American Democracy: The Executive Branch, and co-edited by Aberbach and UCLA Professor of Public Policy Mark A. Peterson, was published in October 2005 by Oxford University Press. Aberbach has been a Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences and the Swedish Collegium for Advanced Study in the Social Sciences, a Visiting Fellow at the University of Bologna’s Institute of Advanced Studies, and a Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution in Washington, D.C. In 2005 he was elected a Fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration.

SELECTED BOOKS & PUBLICATIONS

The Executive Branch
(part of the Institutions of American Democracy Series). New York: Oxford University Press, 2005.
Editors: Joel D. Aberbach and Mark A. Peterson
The Executive Branch

Albert Carnesale

Albert Carnesale is Chancellor Emeritus and Professor at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). He was Chancellor of the University from July 1, 1997 through June 30, 2006, and now serves as Professor of Public Policy and of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. His research and teaching focus on public policy issues having substantial scientific and technological dimensions, and he is the author or co-author of six books and more than 100 articles on a wide range of subjects, including national security strategy, arms control, nuclear proliferation, the effects of technological change on foreign and defense policy, domestic and international energy issues, and higher education.

Carnesale is a member of the Secretary of Energy’s Advisory Board; serves on the National Academies Committee on U.S. Air Force Strategic Deterrence Capabilities; chaired the National Academies Committees on NASA’s Strategic Direction, on America’s Climate Choices, on Nuclear Forensics, and on U.S. Conventional Prompt Global Strike; and was a member of the Obama Administration’s Blue Ribbon Commission on America’s Nuclear Future. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, the Council on Foreign Relations, and the Pacific Council on International Policy; and is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. In addition, he is a member of the Board of Directors of Harvard University’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, and of the Advisory Board of the RAND Corporation’s Center for Global Risk and Security. He serves also on the Boards of Directors of Teradyne and Amicrobe.

Prior to joining UCLA, Carnesale was at Harvard for 23 years, serving as Lucius N. Littauer Professor of Public Policy and Administration, Dean of the John F. Kennedy School of Government, and Provost of the University. He holds a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering (Cooper Union), a master’s degree in mechanical engineering (Drexel University), and a Ph.D. in nuclear engineering (North Carolina State University).

Michael Darby

A recognized authority in macroeconomics and international finance, Michael Darby has achieved great success in both the academic and public sectors. From 1986 to 1992, Darby served in a number of senior positions in the Reagan and Bush administrations including Assistant Secretary of the Treasury for Economic Policy, Member of the National Commission on Superconductivity, Under Secretary of Commerce for Economic Affairs, and Administrator of the Economics and Statistics Administration. During his appointment, he received the Treasury’s highest honor, the Alexander Hamilton Award.

Dr. Darby is the widely-cited author of eleven books and monographs and numerous other professional publications. His most recent research has examined the growth of the biotechnology and nanotechnologies industry in the United States and in California, all science and engineering fields and high-technology industries in the world, and the role that universities and their faculties play in encouraging local economic development. Concurrently he holds appointments as chairman of The Dumbarton Group, research associate with the National Bureau of Economic Research, and adjunct scholar with the American Enterprise Institute. He is also director of UCLA’s John M. Olin Center for Public Policy, a position he has held since 1993. Previous to his Anderson School appointment in 1987, Darby held faculty positions or fellowships with UCLA’s department of economics, Stanford University, and Ohio State University. From his schooling to 1982, he also was vice president and director of Paragon Industries, Inc., a Dallas manufacturer of high-temperature kilns, furnaces, and refractories.

A.E. (TED) Benjamin

An aspect of health care reform that will grow in importance in coming years involves designing and financing effective service systems for people of all ages with chronic health conditions. Professor Benjamin’s recent research has focused on home health services, hospice care, personal assistance services and other long-term services. This research, supported by federal and state governments and private foundations, has examined the differential impact of public program interventions on the elderly, and younger adults with disabilities.

Professor Benjamin’s most recent work has addressed two related areas of services for people with chronic health conditions. The first has involved the impact of different ways of organizing supportive, home-based services on the well-being of people with chronic health conditions. His research has compared traditional agency-based services with newer models that shift primary authority for services decisions and resource allocation to the recipients of services. Surprising findings of the pros and cons of redefining the roles of professionals and consumers have been reported in several journals and numerous presentations. The second research area involves workforce issues, and specifically what our options are for expanding and improving the supply of entry-level health care workers. This is important because this is the segment of the workforce that provides services to people with chronic health conditions at home or in institutional settings. This research is being done in collaboration with labor economists in the Lewis Center for Regional Policy Studies.

SELECTED BOOKS & PUBLICATIONS

Age, Consumer Direction, and Outcomes of Supportive Services at Home
Benjamin, A.E. and R.E. Matthias. “Age, Consumer Direction, and Outcomes of Supportive Services at Home.” The Gerontologist , 41-5 (October 2001), 632-42.

Consumer-Directed Services at Home: A New Model for Persons with Disabilities
Benjamin, A.E. “Consumer-Directed Services at Home: A New Model for Persons with Disabilities.” Health Affairs, 20-6 (November/December 2001), 80-95.

A Normative Analysis of Home Care Goals
Benjamin, A.E. “A Normative Analysis of Home Care Goals.” Journal of Aging and Health 11 (August 1999), 445-68.

Michael Dukakis

Michael Stanley Dukakis was born in Brookline, Massachusetts on November 3, 1933. His parents, Panos and Euterpe (Boukis) Dukakis both emigrated from Greece to the mill cities of Lowell and Haverhill, Massachusetts before marrying and settling down in the town of Brookline, just outside Boston. Dukakis graduated from Brookline High School (1951), Swarthmore College (1955), and Harvard Law School (1960). He served for two years in the United States Army, sixteen months of which he spent with the support group to the United Nations delegation to the Military Armistice Commission in Munsan, Korea.

Dukakis began his political career as an elected Town Meeting Member in the town of Brookline. He was elected chairman of his town’s Democratic organization in 1960 and won a seat in the Massachusetts Legislature in 1962. He served four terms as a legislator, winning reelection by an increasing margin each time he ran. In 1970 he was the Massachusetts Democratic Party’s nominee for Lieutenant Governor and the running mate of Boston mayor Kevin White in the year’s gubernatorial race which they lost to Republicans Frank Sargent and Donald Dwight.

Dukakis won his party’s nomination for Governor in 1974 and beat Sargent decisively in November of that year. He inherited a record deficit and record high unemployment and is generally credited with digging Massachusetts out of one of its worst financial and economic crises in history. But the effort took its toll, and Dukakis was defeated in the Democratic primary in 1978 by Edward King. Dukakis came back to defeat King in 1982 and was reelected to an unprecedented third, four-year term in 1986 by one of the largest margins in history. In 1986, his colleagues in the National Governors’ Association voted him the most effective governor in the nation.

Dukakis won the Democratic nomination for the presidency of the United States in 1988 but was defeated by George Bush. Soon thereafter, he announced that he would not be a candidate for reelection as governor. After leaving office in January 1991, Dukakis and his wife, Kitty, spent three months at the University of Hawaii where Dukakis was a visiting professor in the Department of Political Science and the School of Public Health. While at the University of Hawaii, he taught courses in political leadership and health policy and led a series of public forums on the reform of the nation’s health care system. There has been increasing public interest in Hawaii’s first-in-the-nation universal health insurance system and the lessons that can be learned from it as the nation debates the future of health care in America.

Since June 1991, Dukakis has been a Distinguished Professor of Political Science at Northeastern University and visiting professor at the School of Public Affairs at UCLA. His research has focused on national health care policy reform and the lessons that national policy makers can learn from state reform efforts. He and the late former U.S. Senator Paul Simon authored the book titled “How to Get Into Politics – and Why,” which is designed to encourage young people to think seriously about politics and public service as a career.

Dukakis was nominated by President Clinton for a five-year term as a member of the new Board of Directors of Amtrak, The National Railroad Passenger Corporation on May 21, 1998 and served as Vice-Chairman on the Amtrak Board.

Mike and Kitty Dukakis have three children: John, Andrea and Kara, and are the proud grandparents of Alexandra Jane Dukakis, Harry Nicholas Hereford, Josephine Katharine Hereford, Olivia Dukakis Onek, Peter Antonio Dukakis, Nora Dukakis Onek, and Sofia Elena Dukakis.

Neal Halfon

Dr. Halfon received an MD from the University of California, Davis, and a MPH from the University of California, Berkeley. He completed his pediatric residency at UC San Diego and UC San Francisco. Dr. Halfon was a Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholar at both UC San Francisco and Stanford.

He has published the results of research on immunizations for inner-city children, health care needs to children in foster care, trends in chronic illnesses for children, delivery of health care services for children with asthma, and investigations of new models of health service delivery for high-risk children. Dr. Halfon recently co-authored and co-edited Child Rearing in America: Challenges Facing Parents with Young Children with Kathryn Taaffe McLearn and Mark A. Shuster. In this volume Dr. Halfon and a team of experts analyze findings from recent nationwide surveys, offering new insights into parenting beliefs and practices that can help to bring about more family-responsive and holistic child health and developmental services. Dr. Halfon also led the team that developed and implemented the 2000 National Survey of Early Childhood Health, and supervised the analysis of that survey, and the resulting special supplement to the journal Pediatrics which will be published in the fall of 2003.

Dr. Halfon’s primary research interests include the provision of developmental service to young children, access to care for low-income children, and delivery of health services to children with special health care needs — with a particular interest in abused and neglected children who are in the foster care system. His recent work attempts to define a developmentally-focused model of health production across the life course, and to understand the implications of such an approach for the delivery and financing of health care. He is currently co-chair of the Health Services Working Group for the planned National Children’s Study, an effort being led by the National Institute for Child Health and Human Development and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Dr Halfon was appointed to the Board on Children, Youth, and Families of the National Research Council and Institute of Medicine in 2001. He has also served on numerous expert panels and advisory committees including the 1999 Institute of Medicine committee commissioned by Surgeon General Satcher to propose the leading health indicators to measure the countries progress on our National Healthy Peoples agenda. He currently serves on a congressionally mandated Committee of the Institute of Medicine to evaluate how children’s health should be measured in the US.

Neal Halfon, MD, MPH is the Director of the UCLA Center for Healthier Children, Families and Communities, and also directs the Child and Family Health Program in the UCLA School of Public Health, and the federally funded Maternal and Child Health Bureau’s National Center for Infancy and Early Childhood Health Policy Research. Dr. Halfon is a Professor of Pediatrics in the UCLA School of Medicine and Professor of Community Health Sciences in the UCLA School of Public Health, and is Professor of Policy Studies in the School of Public Policy and Social Research and is a also consultant in the Health Program at RAND.

Joel F. Handler

Professor Handler’s principal areas of research are poverty issues in law and administration, the structure and operation of welfare programs, client-agency relationships and welfare reform. While on the faculty at the University of Wisconsin Law School, he was a senior researcher at the Institute for Research on Poverty and chaired the Governor’s Task Force for the Reform of General Relief. He is past president of the Law and Society Association.

A Guggenheim Fellow and former member of the National Academy of Science’s Committee on the Status of Black America, he also served as chair of the Academy’s Panel on High Risk Youth. Lately, he has been working on the symbolic politics of welfare reform, from a historical perspective as well as dealing with current welfare reform proposals. He also has explored client-agency relationships in the areas of education, health care, worker safety, local government and low-income housing.

SELECTED BOOKS & PUBLICATIONS

Hard Labor: Women and Work in the Post-Welfare Era
Handler, J. and Lucie White (eds.) Hard Labor: Women and Work in the Post-Welfare Era. M.E. Sharpe, (1999).

Down From Bureaucracy: The Ambiguity of Empowerment and Privatization
Handler, J. Down From Bureaucracy: The Ambiguity of Empowerment and Privatization. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. (1996).

The Poverty of Welfare Reform
Handler, J. The Poverty of Welfare Reform. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1995.
Publication Link: The Poverty of Welfare Reform