Steve Zipperstein

Steve Zipperstein teaches in the UCLA Global Studies program and in the Luskin School of Public Affairs.  Zipperstein is also is a Senior Fellow at the UCLA Center for Middle East Development.  He has served as a Visiting Professor of Law at Tel Aviv University and as an Adjunct Professor at Loyola Law School.  Zipperstein is the author of the forthcoming book Law and the Arab-Israeli Conflict: The Trials of Palestine (Routledge).  He has also authored several law review articles, and has testified before the United States Congress several times regarding telecommunications and internet policy issues.  Zipperstein lectures widely around the world on cybersecurity, advanced technology, and a range of U.S. and Middle East issues.

Before joining UCLA, Zipperstein practiced law for 36 years in California, Washington D.C. and New York/New Jersey.  Zipperstein has been elected to the American Law Institute and named a Life Fellow of the American Bar Foundation.  During his career, Zipperstein worked as a law firm litigator, a federal prosecutor and Justice Department official, and as the Chief Legal Officer of  BlackBerry Ltd. and Verizon Wireless.  Zipperstein served as Counselor to Attorney General Janet Reno during the 1995 congressional hearings regarding the events in Waco, Texas, and as Counselor for former Assistant Attorney General Robert Mueller regarding the 1992-93 congressional investigation of the “Iraq-gate” matter.  As a federal prosecutor, Zipperstein tried more than a dozen felony jury cases and argued 23 cases in the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals.

In the Media

April 2019 – The Dan Abrams Podcast with Steve Zipperstein on Sirius XM

April 2017 – “Is America in a Cold Civil War?” on KJZZ 91.5

 

 

Emily Weisburst

I am an Assistant Professor of Public Policy at the Luskin School of Public Affairs at the University of California, Los Angeles. My research focuses on topics in labor economics and public finance, including criminal justice and education.

I recently earned my Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Texas at Austin. While in graduate school, I worked as a Staff Economist at the Council of Economic Advisers in the Executive Office of the President and as a research associate for the RAND Corporation on joint projects with the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. I have also received the NAED Spencer Dissertation Fellowship to support my research on the impact of funding for police in public schools on student disciplinary outcomes and educational attainment in Texas.

My research interests include understanding factors that impact police decision-making and public trust in police. I am also interested in how interactions with the criminal justice system affect individuals, families and communities. A recent paper examines how much police discretion matters to law enforcement outcomes, after accounting for offense context. In this project, I find that the likelihood that an incident results in an arrest critically depends on the officer that shows up to respond to an offense reported through a police call for service.

For more information about my work, check out my website: emilyweisburst.com