Deshonay Dozier

Deshonay Dozier completed her Ph.D. in Environmental Psychology from the City University of New York. Dr. Dozier’s scholar-activism provides critical research that shapes public policy and implementation on the issues of housing, homelessness, and alternatives to incarceration. As a UC Chancellor’s Fellow, she will complete a book manuscript on how poor people reshape the penal organization of their lives through alternative visions of Los Angeles. Dr. Dozier teaches a diverse working-class student population at the California State University-Long Beach on how social movements transform geography.

Madeline Wander

Madeline Wander is a UCLA Urban Planning doctoral student and a graduate student researcher at the UCLA Lewis Center for Regional Policy Studies. Her research examines transportation disparities and justice amidst the changing geography of low-income communities of color from cities to suburbs. Madeline holds a BA in Urban and Environmental Policy from Occidental College and a Master’s in Urban and Regional Planning from UCLA. Madeline sits on the Board of Directors of the Center on Race, Poverty, and the Environment.

Prior to pursuing her PhD, she was a Senior Data Analyst at the USC Program for Environmental and Regional Equity (now USC Equity Research Institute) where she worked with community-based organizations, foundations, and government agencies on research around equitable urban planning, social-movement building, and environmental justice. Prior to that, she was involved in variety of organizing efforts, including the affordable housing coalition Housing LA and Barack Obama’s 2008 presidential campaign in Colorado.

Madeline is co-author of several publications, including: Carbon trading, co-pollutants, and environmental equity: Evidence from California’s cap-and-trade program (2011–2015) (2018); Measures Matter: Ensuring Equitable Implementation of Los Angeles County Measures M & A (2018); and Changing States: A Framework for Progressive Governance (2016).

Madeline is mother to 4-year-old Hannah, who just learned to ride a bike; Madeline could not be prouder.

Emma Mehlig French

Emma is a PhD student in Urban Planning and a Graduate Student Researcher with the Luskin Center for Innovation. Her research seeks to understand the nature and causes of maladaptation in local climate planning. Her work is grounded in the political nature of planning, as well as a strong belief in the power of individuals and social movements to shift practice through coordinated action. At the Luskin Center, Emma is helping to evaluate the first round of the Transformative Climate Communities (TCC) Program, a state-funded, community-led initiative aimed at reducing local greenhouse gas emissions and improving public health and economic wellbeing in California.

Prior to coming to UCLA, Emma was a Research Scientist at the Center for Urban Innovation at the Georgia Institute of Technology, where she helped launch the Smart Cities and Inclusive Innovation Initiative. In 2016, Emma received a Smart Cities Fellowship, which she used to help fund independent research on the role of smart city technologies in participatory environmental planning in West Atlanta. Emma received a Master’s of City and Regional Planning and a MSc in Public Policy from Georgia Tech, and a BA in Environmental Analysis from Pitzer College.

Chris Zepeda-Millán

Biography:

Born and raised in the East Los Angeles barrio of Boyle Heights, Chris Zepeda-Millán was the first Chicano to receive a Ph.D. from the Department of Government at Cornell University. His research has been published in top political science and interdisciplinary academic journals, such as the American Journal of Political Science (AJPS), Political Research Quarterly (PRQ), Politics, Groups and Identities (PGI), Critical Sociology, the Chicana/o Latina/o Law Review, Social Science Quarterly (SSQ), and the Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies (JEMS). His first book, Latino Mass Mobilization: Immigration, Racialization, and Activism (Cambridge University Press) received multiple national honors, including the prestigious Ralph J. Bunche “Best Book on Ethnic and Cultural Pluralism Award” from the American Political Science Association (APSA), the “Best Book on Race and Immigration Award” from the Race, Ethnicity, and Politics (REP) Section of the APSA, and the coveted “Charles Tilly Distinguished Contribution to Scholarship  Book Award” from the American Sociological Association’s Section on Collective Behavior and Social Movements. He is currently working on multiple research projects, including a co-authored book tentatively titled, Walls, Cages, and Family Separation: Immigration Policy in the Time of Trump (2020).

As a publicly engaged scholar, Professor Zepeda-Millán has been interviewed by several local, national, and international media outlets. His public intellectual work includes working with local and national community organizations, publishing op-eds in local newspapers across the country, and being an invited contributor to NBC News, Latino Decisions, the London School of Economics’ USA blog, The Progressive magazine, and The Huffington Post. Professor Zepeda-Millan has also been involved in various social movements related to environmental and global justice, labor, student, immigrant, and indigenous rights.

Prior to joining the Departments of Public Policy and Chicana/o Studies and becoming the Director of Faculty Research for the Latino Policy & Politics Initiative (LPPI) at UCLA, Professor Zepeda-Millán was a Provost Postdoctoral Scholar in the Department of Political Science at the University of Chicago, as well as a faculty member at Loyola Marymount University and UC Berkeley, where he chaired the Center for Research on Social Change. More information about his research and teaching can be found at zepedamillan.com.

Courses:

Immigration Policy
Latino Politics
Social Movements
Racial Politics
Interdisciplinary Research Methods
Urban Politics

Books:

Latino Mass Mobilization: Immigration, Racialization, and Activism (Cambridge University Press 2017).

Selected Articles & Book Chapters:

“Mobilizing for Immigrant Rights Under Trump.”
With Sophia Wallace. Charting the Resistance: The Emergence of the Movement Against President Donald Trump. Eds. Sidney Tarrow and David Mayer (Forthcoming, Oxford University Press).

“The Political Effects of Having Undocumented Parents: How Parental Illegality Impacts the Political Behavior of their U.S.-Born Children.”
With Alex Street and Michael Jones-Correa. Political Research Quarterly. Vol. 70 (4): 818-832, 2017.

“The Impact of Large-Scale Collective Action on Latino Perceptions of Commonality and Competition with African-Americans.”
With Michael Jones-Correa and Sophia Wallace. Social Science Quarterly (SSQ), Vol. 97 (2): 458-475, 2016.

“Weapons of the (Not So) Weak: Immigrant Mass Mobilization in the U.S. South.”
Critical Sociology, Vol. 42 (2): 269-287, 2016.

“Mass Deportation and the Future of Latino Partisanship.”
With Alex Street and Michael Jones-Correa. Social Science Quarterly (SSQ), Vol. 96 (2): 540-552, 2015.

“Perceptions of Threat, Demographic Diversity, and the Framing of Illegality: Explaining (non)Participation in New York’s 2006 Immigrant Protests.”
Political Research Quarterly (PRQ), 67(4): 880-888, 2014.

“Triangulation in Social Movement Research.”
With Phil M. Ayoub and Sophia J. Wallace. Methodological Practices In Social Movement Research. Donatella della Porta (Ed.), Oxford University Press, 2014.

“Spatial and Temporal Proximity:  Examining the Effects of the 2006 Immigrant Rights Marches on Political Attitudes.”
With Sophia Wallace and Michael Jones-Correa. American Journal of Political Science (AJPS), 58(2): 433-448, 2014.

“Racialization in Times of Contention:  How Social Movements Influence Latino Racial Identity.”
With Sophia Wallace. Politics, Groups, and Identities (PGI), 1(4): 510-527, 2013.

“Undocumented Immigrant Activism and Rights.”
Battleground Immigration: The New Immigrants, Vol. 2., Ed. Judith Warner, Westport, CT: Greenwood, 2008.

Kenton Card

Kenton Card is a filmmaker, teacher, and PhD Candidate in the Department of Urban Planning at the University of California, Los Angeles. His work has long investigated how housing is nested within structural social, economic, gender, and racial inequalities. Kenton draws primarily on the methods of participant observation, policy analysis, and documentary filmmaking. He is currently a Dissertation Research Grantee from the German Academic Exchange Service, Guest Scholar at the Freie Universität Berlin, and a Visiting Researcher at the Berlin Social Science Research Center.

 

RESEARCH

Kenton’s dissertation compares housing politics in Los Angeles and Berlin, focusing on rental housing policy, social movements, and interest group lobbying. He investigates the process by which tenants, landlords, and government officials influence rent control policymaking, and how, why, and to what end these agents employ particular strategies to influence policy outcomes.

 

FACULTY

Kenton’s dissertation is tentatively titled “Comparing Housing Policymaking Across Racial Capitalist Regimes.” His dissertation committee is comprised of Chris Tilly (chair), Anastasia Loukaitou-Sideris, Michael Storper, Allan Heskin (emeritus), and Desiree Fields (outsider). Kenton is supported in Berlin by Antonie Schmiz (FU), Jutta Allmendinger (WZB), and Margit Mayer (FU & TU Berlin). For his comprehensive examination, Kenton studied under Ananya Roy (previous-chair), Paul Ong, Chris Tilly, and Eric Sheppard.

 

PEDAGOGY & SPATIAL PRAXIS

Kenton has actively engaged in and researched place-based pedagogy as a strategy of spatial praxis beyond the university. For instance, in 2018 and 2020 he worked as a Teaching Assistant on scholar-activist/community-university research projects: for Jan Breidenbach on the UCLA Labor Center’s Community Scholars’ “Do Bills Build Homes? An Assessment of California’s 2017 Housing Package on Addressing the Housing Crisis in Los Angeles County”; and later for Sandra McNeill on the UCLA Department of Urban Planning’s Community Collaborative’s “De-Commodifying Housing During Covid-19.”

 

In 2012, Kenton co-launched a research collective called The City and the Political at The Public School, Berlin. His early research revealed unintended consequences of public interest architectural design-build programs across the USA. In 2008-2010 Kenton led a two-year project to design and build an agricultural greenhouse (964 sq ft) for Marlboro College, which included leading a community design process, fundraising initiative, and a sustainable construction process by salvaging materials and harvesting/milling timber.

 

RELATED EXPERIENCE

Kenton is a member of the California Economists Collective. He has also worked as a filmmaker for the Antipode Foundation, as the former Managing Editor of Critical Planning Journal, and as a student advisor to the Institute on Inequality and Democracy. Finally Kenton’s past advocacy experience includes working for Housing California and the Planning and Conservation League.

 

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS

Card, Kenton. “Contradictions of Housing Commons: Between Middle Class and Anarchist Models in Berlin.” In Commoning the City: Empirical Perspectives on Urban Ecology, Economics, and Ethics, edited by Derya Ozkan and Guldem Baykal. Routledge, 2020.

Card, Kenton. “Urban Commons.” In Urban Studies Inside-out: Theory, Method, Practice., edited by Helga Leitner, Jamie Peck, and Eric Sheppard. Sage, 2019.

Card, Kenton, Andre Comandon, and Joseph A. Daniels. “Grounding the Housing Question in Land: On Anna Haila’s Urban Land Rent.” In Urban Studies Inside/Out: Theory, Method, Practice, edited by Helga Leitner, Jamie Peck, and Eric Sheppard. SAGE Publications Inc, 2019.

Card, Kenton, and Jan Breidenbach. “Bernie Should Declare Housing a Human Right.” Jacobin Magazine, August 5, 2019.

Card, Kenton. “Thinking Across Tactics of Tenant Movements: Los Angeles and Berlin.” Progressive City, February 5, 2018.

Jones, Paul, and Kenton Card. “Constructing ‘Social Architecture’: The Politics of Representing Practice.Architectural Theory Review 16, no. 3 (2011): 228–244.

Card, Kenton. “Democratic Social Architecture or Experimentation on the Poor?: Ethnographic Snapshots.” Design Philosophy Papers 9, no. 3 (2011): 217–234.

 

FILMS

Geographies of Racial Capitalism with Ruth Wilson (Antipode Foundation)
Berlin’s Urban Fights 
Architecture for the Underserved
Erik Swyngedouw: Politics and the Political
Firebreak Project

 

LINKS

academia.edu
LinkedIn
Twitter