Steve Zipperstein

Steve Zipperstein teaches in the UCLA Global Studies program and in the Luskin School of Public Affairs.  Zipperstein is also is a Senior Fellow at the UCLA Center for Middle East Development.  He has served as a Visiting Professor of Law at Tel Aviv University and as an Adjunct Professor at Loyola Law School.  Zipperstein is the author of the forthcoming book Law and the Arab-Israeli Conflict: The Trials of Palestine (Routledge).  He has also authored several law review articles, and has testified before the United States Congress several times regarding telecommunications and internet policy issues.  Zipperstein lectures widely around the world on cybersecurity, advanced technology, and a range of U.S. and Middle East issues.

Before joining UCLA, Zipperstein practiced law for 36 years in California, Washington D.C. and New York/New Jersey.  Zipperstein has been elected to the American Law Institute and named a Life Fellow of the American Bar Foundation.  During his career, Zipperstein worked as a law firm litigator, a federal prosecutor and Justice Department official, and as the Chief Legal Officer of  BlackBerry Ltd. and Verizon Wireless.  Zipperstein served as Counselor to Attorney General Janet Reno during the 1995 congressional hearings regarding the events in Waco, Texas, and as Counselor for former Assistant Attorney General Robert Mueller regarding the 1992-93 congressional investigation of the “Iraq-gate” matter.  As a federal prosecutor, Zipperstein tried more than a dozen felony jury cases and argued 23 cases in the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals.

In the Media

April 2019 – The Dan Abrams Podcast with Steve Zipperstein on Sirius XM

April 2017 – “Is America in a Cold Civil War?” on KJZZ 91.5

 

 

Wesley Yin

Wesley “Wes” Yin is an associate professor in the UCLA Luskin Department of Public Policy and the Anderson School of Management at UCLA, and is a Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research. Prior to coming to UCLA, Wesley served as Acting Assistant Secretary of Economic Policy at the Department of Treasury, and as a Senior Economist in the White House Council of Economic Advisers, in the Obama Administration. He also taught at Boston University and the University of Chicago, and was a Robert Wood Johnson Scholar in Health Policy at Harvard University.

Yin researches health care, economic development, and consumer finance. His current research studies how innovation and policy reforms in health care and social insurance affect consumer health and financial well-being, public finance, and equity.

 

PUBLISHED AND FORTHCOMING ECONOMICS PAPERS

The Market for High-Quality Medicine: Retail Chain Entry and Drug Quality in India (with Daniel Bennett) Review of Economics and Statistics, March 2019, Volume 101(1) p.76-90 [Appendix]

Insurers’ Negotiating Leverage and the External Effect of Medicare Part D (with Darius Lakdawalla), Review of Economics and Statistics,  97:2 p.314-331 May 2015 (an earlier version appears as NBER working paper no. 16251)

R&D Policy, Agency Costs and Innovation in Personalized Medicine, Journal of Health Economics, September 2009, 28(5), pp. 950-962

Market Incentives and Pharmaceutical Innovation, Journal of Health Economics, July 2008, 27(4), pp. 1060-1077

Female Empowerment: Impact of a Commitment Savings Product in the Philippines (with Nava Ashraf and Dean Karlan) World Development, 2010, 38(3), pages 333-344

Tying Odysseus to the Mast: Evidence from a Commitment Savings Product in the Philippines (with Nava Ashraf and Dean Karlan) Quarterly Journal of Economics, May 2006, 121(2). Winner of TIAA-CREF 2006 Certificate of Excellence

Designing Targeting Schemes with Poverty Maps: Does Disaggregation Help? (with Berk Özler, Chris Elbers, Tomoki Fujii, Peter Lanjouw), Journal of Development Economics, May 2007, 83(1)

Deposit Collectors (with Nava Ashraf and Dean Karlan), Advances in Economic Analysis & Policy, March 2006, 6(2), Article 5

 

WORKING PAPERS

The Role of Behavioral Frictions in Health Insurance Marketplace Enrollment and Risk: Evidence from a Field Experiment (with Richard Domurat and Isaac Menashe) [Online Appendix]

Provider Market Power and Adverse Selection in Health Insurance
Markets (with Richard Domurat and Nicholas Tilipman)

 

PUBLISHED POLICY and MEDICAL JOURNAL ARTICLES

Potential Impacts of Graham-Cassidy-Heller-Johnson on Californians and the Individual Health Insurance Market” Covered California Report, September 25, 2017 (w/ John Berko)

Evaluating the Potential Consequences of Terminating Direct Federal Cost-Sharing Reduction (CSR) Funding” Covered California Report, January 26, 2017 (w/Richard Domurat) [Appendix]

Trump’s “populist” economic proposals come with massive catches. Here’s what to watch for.” Vox, November 18, 2016

Strengthening Risk Protection through Private Long-Term Care Insurance. Brookings Institution, Hamilton Project Discussion Paper 2015-06, June 2015

Value of Survival Gains in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (with John Penrod, J. Ross Maclean, Darius Lakdawalla and Tomas Philipson) American Journal of Managed Care 2012 Nov;18(11 Suppl):S257-64

The impact of Medicare Part D on Medicare-Medicaid Dual-eligible Beneficiaries’ Prescription Utilization and Expenditures (with Caleb Alexander and Anirban Basu), Health Services Research, February 2010, 45(1), pp. 133-151   

Valuing health technologies at NICE: Recommendations for Improved Incorporation of Treatment Value in HTA (with Dana Goldman, Darius Lakdawalla and Tomas Philipson) Health Economics October 2010, 10(11) pp. 1109-1116

The Effect of the Medicare Part D Prescription Benefit on Drug Utilization and Expenditures (with Anirban Basu, James Zhang, Atonu Rabbani, David Meltzer, Caleb Alexander) Annals of Internal Medicine, Lead article, February 2008, 148:3 pp. 169-177

Solutions and Challenges to Curing Global Health Inequality Innovations 2(4), October 2007, 2(4), pp. 72-80

Impact of the Medicare Part D prescription benefit on use of generic drugs and different therapeutic drug classes (with James Zhang and Caleb Alexander) The Journal of General Internal Medicine, October 2008, 23:10 pp. 1673-1678

Testing Savings Product Innovations Using an Experimental Methodology (with Nava Ashraf and Dean Karlan), Asian Development Bank, Economics and Research Department Technical Paper No. 8. November, 2003

A Review of Commitment Savings Products in Developing Countries (with Nava Ashraf, Nathalie Gons and Dean Karlan), Asian Development Bank, Economics and Research Department Working Paper No. 45 June, 2003

 

CURRENT TEACHING

Econometrics (MPP Core) (PP208)

Public Finance (and the Economics of Inequality) (Econ 415)

Health Care Finance and Management (MBA and MPP elective) (MGMT298 & PP290)

 

 

 

Paavo Monkkonen

Paavo Monkkonen is Associate Professor of Urban Planning and Public Policy at the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs, director of the Latin American Cities Initiative, the coordinator of the Regional and International Development Concentration, and a Faculty Cluster Leader for the Global Public Affairs Initiative. Paavo researches and writes on the ways policies and markets shape urbanization and social segregation in cities around the world. His scholarship ranges from studies of large-scale national housing finance programs to local land use regulations and property rights institutions often not recognized for their importance to housing. Past and ongoing comparative research on socioeconomic segregation and land markets spans several countries including Argentina, Brazil, China, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, and the United States. Paavo continues to work as a consultant on national housing and urban policy in Mexico, where he has various long-term research projects.

At UCLA Luskin, Paavo teaches courses on housing markets and policy, applied microeconomics, research methods, and global urban segregation. He recently launched the Latin American Cities Initiative, Ciudades, an effort to develop and deepen knowledge networks among students, educators, and professionals in the arena of urban planning and policy in South, Central, and North America. One of the initiative’s core components is an international planning studio in Latin America (past studio reports available here).

Professor Monkkonen’s research has been published in journals such as the Journal of the American Planning Association, the International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, the Journal of Urban Economics, Regional Science and Urban Economics, Urban Studies, World Development, and the Journal of Peasant Studies. In recent years, he has received research funding from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Urban Land Institute and LA Metro, the Regional Studies Association, the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy, and the UC Berkeley Terner Center for Housing Innovation. Examples of current projects include a comparative analysis of socio-economic segregation in over 600 cities in 13 countries, a comparison of how higher levels of government shape planning processes in California and Mexico, and a study of inertia in land markets through the evaluation of unbuilt zoned capacity in California’s urban areas.

Paavo completed a Master of Public Policy at the School of Public Affairs at the University of California, Los Angeles, and a PhD in City and Regional Planning at the University of California, Berkeley. He was previously Assistant Professor of Urban Planning at the University of Hong Kong from 2009 to 2012, and visiting scholar at the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico in 2015.

LinkedIn profile

Follow him on Twitter

 

SELECTED BOOKS & PUBLICATIONS

Empty Houses across North America: Housing Finance and Mexico’s Vacancy Crisis. Monkkonen, Paavo. 2018. Urban Studies, forthcoming.

Urban Sprawl and the Growing Geographic Scale of Segregation in Mexico, 1990-2010. Monkkonen, Paavo, Jorge Montejano Escamilla, Erick Guerra, and Andre Comandon. 2018. Habitat International, 73 89-95.

Understanding and Challenging Opposition to Housing Construction in California’s Urban Areas
Monkkonen, Paavo. 2016.
University of California Center Sacramento.

Are civil-law notaries rent-seeking monopolists or essential market intermediaries? Endogenous development of a property rights institution in Mexico
Monkkonen, Paavo. 2016.
Journal of Peasant Studies, 43(6), 1224-1248.

Where are property rights worth more? Assessing variation in the value of deeds across cities in Mexico
Monkkonen, Paavo. 2016.
World Development, 88, 67-78.

Do Strict Land Use Regulations make Metropolitan Areas more Segregated by Income?
Michael Lens and Paavo Monkkonen. 2016
Journal of the American Planning Association, 82(1): 6-21.

How Economic Development Shapes Household Structure and the Age of Leaving Home and Household Formation: Evidence from 67 countries
Monkkonen, Paavo. 2015
UCLA Ziman Center Working Paper 2015-07.

Land Use Regulations and the Value of Land and Housing: An Intra-Metropolitan Analysis
Kok, Nils, Paavo Monkkonen and John M. Quigley. 2014
Journal of Urban Economics, 81(3): 136–148.

Innovative Measurement of Spatial Segregation: Comparative Evidence from Hong Kong and San Francisco. 
Monkkonen, Paavo and Xiaohu Zhang. 2014
Regional Science and Urban Economics, 47(3): 99-11.

Land Use Regulations, Compliance, and Land Markets in Argentina
Monkkonen, Paavo and Lucas Roconi. 2013
Urban Studies, 50(10): 1951-1969.

Housing Finance Reform and Increasing Socioeconomic Segregation in Mexico
Monkkonen, Paavo. 2012
International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, 36(4): 757-772.

Economic Restructuring, Urban Growth, and Short-term Trades: The Spatial Dynamics of the Hong Kong Housing Market, 1992-2008
Monkkonen, Paavo, Kelvin SK Wong, and Jaclene Begley. 2012
Regional Science and Urban Economics, 42(3): 396-406.

The Demand for Land Regularization: Theory and Evidence from Tijuana, Mexico
Monkkonen, Paavo. 2012
Urban Studies, 49(2): 270-287.

The Housing Transition in Mexico: Expanding Access to Housing Finance
Monkkonen, Paavo. 2011
Urban Affairs Review, 47(5): 672-695.

Mark A.R. Kleiman

Mark Kleiman died July 21, 2019. A memoriam to his life and career can be found here.

Mark Kleiman was Professor Emeritus of Public Policy in the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs and was employed at NYU at time of his death.

Mr. Kleiman was the author of Marijuana: Costs of Abuse, Costs of Control; of Against Excess: Drug Policy for Results;  and of When Brute Force Fails: How to Have Less Crime and Less Punishment, listed by The Economist as one of the “Books of the Year” for 2009.  Drugs and Drug Policy: What Everyone Needs to Know (co-authored with Jonathan Caulkins and Angela Hawken) was published in July 2011 by Oxford University Press. He edited the Journal of Drug Policy Analysis.

In addition to his academic work, Mr. Kleiman provided advice to local, state, and national governments on crime control and drug policy. Before he came to UCLA in 1995, he taught at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government and at the University of Rochester. Outside of academia, he had worked for the U.S. Department of Justice (as Director of Policy and Management Analysis for the Criminal Division), for the City of Boston (as Deputy Director for Management of the Mayor’s Office of Management and Budget), for Polaroid Corporation (as Special Assistant to the CEO, Edwin Land), and on Capitol Hill (as a legislative assistant to Congressman Les Aspin). He graduated from Haverford College (magna cum laude, majoring in political science, philosophy, and economics) and did his graduate work (M.P.P. and Ph.D.) at the Kennedy School.

Mr. Kleiman blogged at The Reality-Based Community, at samefacts.org

SELECTED BOOKS & PUBLICATIONS

When Brute Force Fails
Since the crime explosion of the 1960s, the prison population in the United States has multiplied fivefold, to one prisoner for every hundred adults — a rate unprecedented in American history and unmatched anywhere in the world. Even as the prisoner head count continues to rise, crime has stopped falling, and poor people and minorities still bear the brunt of both crime and punishment. When Brute Force Fails explains how we got into the current trap and how we can get out of it: to cut both crime and the prison population in half within a decade.
Read more

Excess: Drug Policy for Results
Kleiman, M. Against Excess: Drug Policy for Results. New York: Basic Books, 1992. Kleiman, M.Marijuana: Costs of Abuse, Cost of Control. Greenwich, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1989.
Read more

Gary M. Segura

Gary Segura is the Dean of the Luskin School of Public Affairs at UCLA.

His work focuses on issues of political representation and social cleavages, the domestic politics of wartime public opinion, and the politics of America’s growing Latino minority.  Among his most recent publications are “Latino America: How America’s Most Dynamic Population is Poised to Transform the Politics of the Nation” with Matt Barreto (Public Affairs Press, 2014); “The Future is Ours: Minority Politics, Political Behavior, and the Multiracial Era of American Politics” with Shaun Bowler (2011, Congressional Quarterly Press), and two books with the Latino National Survey team: “Latinos in the New Millennium: An Almanac of Opinion, Behavior, and Policy Preferences” (2012, Cambridge University Press), and “Latino Lives in America: Making It Home” (2010, Temple University Press). He has another book in press, “Calculated War: The Public and a Theory of Conflict,” with Scott S. Gartner, under contract to Cambridge University Press.

EMPLOYMENT SCAM ALERT: UCLA Health Recruitment is currently being targeted by scam artists through external job board sites. If you feel you received bogus emails and offers from someone claiming to be Dean Gary Segura, please see this document to review some tips in order to avoid becoming targeted.

Earlier work has been published in the American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, Journal of Politics, Political Research Quarterly, and the Annual Review of Political Science, among many others.

Over the last 18 years, he has directed polling research that has completed over 100,000 interviews of Americans of all backgrounds on matters of political importance. He has briefed members of both the House and Senate as well as senior administration officials and appeared on National Public Radio, the “News Hour,” “Frontline,” “the CBS Evening News,” MSNBC, and numerous other outlets.

Segura served as an expert witness on the nature of political power in all three of landmark LGBT marriage rights cases in 2013 and 2015, Windsor v. United States, Hollingsworth v Perry, and the historic Obergefell v. Hodges, which recognized marriage equality as a constitutionally protected right. He has provided expert testimony on discrimination in both voting rights cases and LGBT civil rights cases, and filed amicus curiae briefs on subjects as diverse as marriage equality and affirmative action.

Segura was one of the principal investigators of both the 2012 and 2016 American National Election Studies, and was one of the principal investigators of the Latino National Survey, in 2006.

He is a past president of the Midwest Political Science Association and the Western Political Science Association, and a past executive council member of the American Political Science Association. He is a past president of El Sector Latino de la Ciencia Política (Latino Caucus in Political Science). In 2010, he was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

 

 

 

Kevin de León

Kevin de León is President pro Tempore Emeritus of the California State Senate. He is the son of a single immigrant mother with a third grade education who worked as a housekeeper and held other jobs to support her family. After becoming the first and only in his family to graduate from high school and college, Senator de León rose from the San Diego barrio of Logan Heights to lead the California State Senate, the first Latino to do so in more than a century.

As leader of the California State Senate, he led the nation to establish landmark gun-safety legislation, clean-energy mandates, climate and environmental protections, and immigration reforms. Most recently, Senator de León authored and passed Senate Bill 100 which legally mandates California, the figure largest economy in the world, to achieve 100 percent clean-energy by the year 2045. He is also the author of Senate Bill 54, the California Values Act, also known as the Sanctuary State Bill. Despite a lawsuit brought by former Attorney General Jeff Sessions and the Trump administration, a federal judge ruled that Senator de León’s California Values Act is constitutional and the law of the land in California. Senator de Leon established that largest expansion of retirement security since the Social Security Act with the newly established CalSavers program. Starting in 2019, every Californian without a defined benefit or defined contribution plan at their workplace will be automatically be enrolled in Senator de León’s retirement savings program.

Before entering into politics, Senator de León served the public as a community organizer, taught U.S.citizenship courses and English as a second language, and advocated for public schools. He graduated with honors from Pitzer College at the Claremont Colleges. Senator de León is a Rodel Fellow at The Aspen Institute and lecturer at UC Berkeley, UCLA, Stanford, and USC. He has one daughter and a dog named Popeye.

Gary Orren

Gary Orren is a Visiting Professor of Public Policy at UCLA’s Luskin School of Public Affairs. He teaches and writes on public opinion, politics, and persuasion. He has worked in the United States and abroad as a pollster and strategist for government agencies, corporations, non-profits, candidates, and news organizations, including the Washington Post and the New York Times.  He took a leading roll in creating the first national media poll, The New York Times/CBS News Poll. He helped draft the rules for the U.S. presidential nomination process and has assisted ABC News in its election night forecasting. On leave from Harvard, he worked for three years at the youth corps program City Year as a team leader and director of national policy and planning, and he served for 10 years on City Year’s National Board of Trustees.   His books include Equality in America: The View from the Top; Media and Momentum: The New Hampshire Primary and Nomination Politics; The Electronic Commonwealth: The Impact of New Media Technologies on Democratic Politics; and Media Polls in American Politics. He received his bachelor’s degree summa cum laude from Oberlin and his Ph.D. from Harvard. String instruments are his thing: playing some (violin, guitar) and playing with others (a tennis racket).

Steven H. Nemerovski

Steven H. Nemerovski is a Visiting Professor of Public Policy at UCLA’s Luskin School of Public Affairs. He is currently teaching “Advocacy and The Legislative Process”, a course designed to provide students with an understanding of the legislative process, the role of advocacy and the tools needed to navigate successful outcomes.

Professor Nemerovski has spent the greater part of his career in law, government and politics. He was the Parliamentarian for the Illinois House of Representatives (1995-96) and is an expert in legislative process. As an attorney in government service, Professor Nemerovski was General Counsel to the Illinois Housing Development Authority (1986-92), Special Counsel to The Speaker of the Illinois House of Representatives (1996-97) and outside general counsel to various state agencies in Illinois. He also served as Special Counsel to the Chief Executive Officer of Chicago Public Schools (1997-2000). His political experience includes serving as campaign manager for three campaigns for candidates seeking election to the Illinois House of Representatives and he has consulted on many other campaigns.

He is currently the President of Knell Consulting, Inc., a consulting firm specializing in advocacy at the state level in Illinois and at the Federal level in D.C. Professor Nemerovski has represented a wide variety of clients while generally specializing in healthcare. He is best known for his work representing hospitals that disproportionately serve Medicaid patients, including the Association of Safety-net Community Hospitals, an organization that he created and has represented since 2004.

Professor Nemerovski is actively engaged in efforts to confront and develop solutions for political dysfunction and polarization in the American political system. He produces the “None of The Above” television programming on Grassroots TV in Aspen, CO. He also produces the None of the Above website. Finally, he is the author of the “Third Party” series of political novels.

Cecilia S. Choi

Cecilia S. Choi is the U.S. State Department’s Diplomat in Residence for Southern California, Hawaii and Nevada.  A visiting fellow at UCLA, she is responsible for recruiting talent to pursue a career in public service in global affairs. Choi was the director of trade and investment at the National Security Council serving under the Obama and Trump administrations.  She advised on tariffs, trade agreements and U.S. export promotion.  Choi was the deputy director in the State Department’s Bureau of Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs, where she promoted innovation to address environment challenges. She also served as the food safety adviser at the Bureau of Economic and Business Affairs, promoting U.S. agriculture.

Prior to joining the government, she worked in investor relations, advising Fortune 500 companies on how to promote their publicly traded offerings.  Overseas, she was the economic counselor at the U.S. Embassy in Honduras.  Her other overseas assignments were in South Korea and Turkey.  She also helped coordinate the U.S.-Chile relationship, advancing U.S. interests on free trade and peacekeeping.

Her foreign languages are German, Korean, Persian and Spanish.

Chris Zepeda-Millán

Biography:

Born and raised in the East Los Angeles barrio of Boyle Heights, Chris Zepeda-Millán was the first Chicano to receive a Ph.D. from the Department of Government at Cornell University. His research has been published in top political science and interdisciplinary academic journals, such as the American Journal of Political Science (AJPS), Political Research Quarterly (PRQ), Politics, Groups and Identities (PGI), Critical Sociology, the Chicana/o Latina/o Law Review, Social Science Quarterly (SSQ), and the Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies (JEMS). His first book, Latino Mass Mobilization: Immigration, Racialization, and Activism (Cambridge University Press) received multiple national honors, including the prestigious Ralph J. Bunche “Best Book on Ethnic and Cultural Pluralism Award” from the American Political Science Association (APSA), the “Best Book on Race and Immigration Award” from the Race, Ethnicity, and Politics (REP) Section of the APSA, and the coveted “Charles Tilly Distinguished Contribution to Scholarship  Book Award” from the American Sociological Association’s Section on Collective Behavior and Social Movements. He is currently working on multiple research projects, including a co-authored book tentatively titled, Walls, Cages, and Family Separation: Immigration Policy in the Time of Trump (2020).

As a publicly engaged scholar, Professor Zepeda-Millán has been interviewed by several local, national, and international media outlets. His public intellectual work includes working with local and national community organizations, publishing op-eds in local newspapers across the country, and being an invited contributor to NBC News, Latino Decisions, the London School of Economics’ USA blog, The Progressive magazine, and The Huffington Post. Professor Zepeda-Millan has also been involved in various social movements related to environmental and global justice, labor, student, immigrant, and indigenous rights.

Prior to joining the Departments of Public Policy and Chicana/o Studies and becoming the Director of Faculty Research for the Latino Policy & Politics Initiative (LPPI) at UCLA, Professor Zepeda-Millán was a Provost Postdoctoral Scholar in the Department of Political Science at the University of Chicago, as well as a faculty member at Loyola Marymount University and UC Berkeley, where he chaired the Center for Research on Social Change. More information about his research and teaching can be found at zepedamillan.com.

Courses:

Immigration Policy
Latino Politics
Social Movements
Racial Politics
Interdisciplinary Research Methods
Urban Politics

Books:

Latino Mass Mobilization: Immigration, Racialization, and Activism (Cambridge University Press 2017).

Selected Articles & Book Chapters:

“Mobilizing for Immigrant Rights Under Trump.”
With Sophia Wallace. Charting the Resistance: The Emergence of the Movement Against President Donald Trump. Eds. Sidney Tarrow and David Mayer (Forthcoming, Oxford University Press).

“The Political Effects of Having Undocumented Parents: How Parental Illegality Impacts the Political Behavior of their U.S.-Born Children.”
With Alex Street and Michael Jones-Correa. Political Research Quarterly. Vol. 70 (4): 818-832, 2017.

“The Impact of Large-Scale Collective Action on Latino Perceptions of Commonality and Competition with African-Americans.”
With Michael Jones-Correa and Sophia Wallace. Social Science Quarterly (SSQ), Vol. 97 (2): 458-475, 2016.

“Weapons of the (Not So) Weak: Immigrant Mass Mobilization in the U.S. South.”
Critical Sociology, Vol. 42 (2): 269-287, 2016.

“Mass Deportation and the Future of Latino Partisanship.”
With Alex Street and Michael Jones-Correa. Social Science Quarterly (SSQ), Vol. 96 (2): 540-552, 2015.

“Perceptions of Threat, Demographic Diversity, and the Framing of Illegality: Explaining (non)Participation in New York’s 2006 Immigrant Protests.”
Political Research Quarterly (PRQ), 67(4): 880-888, 2014.

“Triangulation in Social Movement Research.”
With Phil M. Ayoub and Sophia J. Wallace. Methodological Practices In Social Movement Research. Donatella della Porta (Ed.), Oxford University Press, 2014.

“Spatial and Temporal Proximity:  Examining the Effects of the 2006 Immigrant Rights Marches on Political Attitudes.”
With Sophia Wallace and Michael Jones-Correa. American Journal of Political Science (AJPS), 58(2): 433-448, 2014.

“Racialization in Times of Contention:  How Social Movements Influence Latino Racial Identity.”
With Sophia Wallace. Politics, Groups, and Identities (PGI), 1(4): 510-527, 2013.

“Undocumented Immigrant Activism and Rights.”
Battleground Immigration: The New Immigrants, Vol. 2., Ed. Judith Warner, Westport, CT: Greenwood, 2008.