Tam J. Guy

Tam J. Guy is a doctoral student in Urban Planning at UCLA’s Luskin School of Public Affairs. Tam explores how planners can and should create sustainable places for everyone by researching equity impacts at the intersection of transportation, housing, and green infrastructure.

Tam earned a BSBA in management and leadership from Portland State University while working as an analyst at a securities litigation firm and then completed dual masters degrees, MBA and MCMP, at the University of Utah in Business Administration (with emphases in strategy and innovation) and City + Metropolitan Planning (focused on smart growth, transportation, and urban design).

Lia W. Marshall

Lia W. Marshall’s research focuses on older adult well-being. She is particularly interested in understanding prolonged independence and ability to age in place by investigating the interconnections between social isolation, mobility, and the built environment. Lia’s mixed methods dissertation, situated at the nexus of social welfare, gerontology and urban planning, seeks to understand the mobility experiences of socially isolated older adult women. This research is an important step in guiding policymakers to effectively allocate resources to enable aging in place and to enhance the lives of older women.

While Lia has training in both quantitative and qualitative research methods, she is particularly skilled in employing qualitative methodologies. In collaboration with faculty in both UCLA’s Urban Planning and Social Welfare Departments, she has served as a graduate research assistant for several projects, including “Disrupting Aging & Building Livable Communities: Los Angeles”, and with The Los Angeles Community Academic Partnership for Research in Aging (L.A. CAPRA). Lia has presented her work at conferences across academic disciplines, and has taught and guest lectured with both master’s students and undergraduates. Lia’s interests in social welfare, gerontology and urban planning inspired her to develop and teach the course entitled: “Environmentally Sustainable Aging: Diversity, Resilience, and Health” as a teaching fellow at UCLA.

In addition to teaching, Ms. Marshall continues her community engagement work with the Los Angeles Neighborhood Land Trust as a Steering Committee member for Golden Age Park, the first intergenerational park in Los Angeles, and as the Service Learning Coordinator for the UCLA undergraduate gerontology cluster. Lia received a Masters of Social Work from California State University, Los Angeles and a Bachelors of Arts in Psychology from the University of California at Santa Cruz.

Yiwen (Xavier) Kuai

Yiwen is a doctoral student at the Department of Urban Planning at UCLA Luskin. His research interests include housing affordability, neighborhood and poverty, gentrification, transportation, urban economics, and international development. His current research projects include topics on the Low Income Housing Tax Credit program, suburban street width and parking policy, gentrification issues in New York City, social networks among public housing residents, etc. Yiwen is also a research affiliate of Furman Center for Real Estate & Urban Policy at New York University.

LinkedIn: http://linkedin.com/in/xavierkuai
Office Location: 1355 Public Affairs Building

Zev Yaroslavsky

During a career in public life spanning nearly four decades, Zev Yaroslavsky has been at the forefront of Los Angeles County’s biggest issues, including transportation, the environment, health care, and cultural arts.  He has been a pioneering advocate for the region’s homeless population and has played a key role in efforts to reform the county’s law enforcement agencies.

Mr. Yaroslavsky was first elected to office in 1975, stunning the political establishment by winning the Los Angeles City Council’s coveted 5th District seat at the age of 26.  He honed his fiscal skills as chairman of the Council’s Finance Committee and earned a reputation for being unafraid to tackle controversial issues, including the Los Angeles Police Department’s use of excessive force and its improper spying on law-abiding residents.  He authored two landmark ballot initiatives, one which cut in half the size of new commercial developments near residential neighborhoods in the City of L.A., and the other which banned oil drilling along the city’s coastline.

In describing Mr. Yaroslavsky’s City Hall tenure, the Los Angeles Times wrote that he “was more often than not a dominant player in virtually every municipal initiative of note since he joined the City Council.”

In 1994, Mr. Yaroslavsky was elected to the five-member Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors, representing the western part of the county and a constituency of two million people.  He served five terms as the Board’s Third District representative.  Because of term limits, he retired from office on December 1, 2014.  Supervisor Yaroslavsky’s award-winning website, which ran from late 2009 until the end of his term, including blog entries and feature stories on County issues, programs and personalities, can be accessed here.

As a member of the Board of Supervisors, Mr. Yaroslavsky quickly emerged as a leader on fiscal, health care, transportation, cultural and environmental matters.  He authored several landmark ballot initiatives:  the 1996 park bond, which resulted in the preservation of a broad swath of rural open space and the development of urban parks throughout the county, and the 2002 trauma tax, approved by more than 73% of county voters—a measure credited with saving two public hospitals from closure and keeping the county’s emergency services intact.

Mr. Yaroslavsky was the driving force behind several major transit projects, including the hugely successful Orange Line busway across the San Fernando Valley, the Exposition Light Rail line from downtown to Santa Monica which will be completed at the end of 2015, and the subway—Purple Line—extension from Western Ave. to West Los Angeles which broke ground in 2014.

After the closure of Martin Luther King, Jr. hospital in south Los Angeles, Mr. Yaroslavsky proposed a partnership between the University of California and Los Angeles County upon which the recently re-opened hospital was modeled.  Mr. Yaroslavsky also launched the building of three innovative school-based health clinics in largely working-class neighborhoods where many residents are living below the poverty line and rarely seek medical attention.  He also led the effort to provide permanent supportive housing for thousands of homeless persons who’ve been identified as most likely to die if they remained on county streets.

During his public service career, Mr. Yaroslavsky was the county’s leader in the cultural arts.  The Los Angeles Times said of him before he retired, “It would be hard to find another major politician anywhere in the entire country with Yaroslavsky’s record for outright arts support and achievement.” He championed efforts to rebuild and modernize the world famous Hollywood Bowl amphitheater and was instrumental in the development of architect Frank Gehry’s iconic Walt Disney Concert Hall, home of the L.A. Philharmonic Orchestra.  He has also funded major investments in the County Museum of Art, the Museum of Natural History and the San Fernando Valley Performing Arts Center.

Mr. Yaroslavsky is also credited with playing a leading role in the sweeping reforms of the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department.  He is responsible for the creation of the Citizen’s Commission on Jail Violence in 2011 which recommended dozens of measures to restore constitutional policing and integrity to the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department and its jails.

Apart from his responsibilities as an elected official, Mr. Yaroslavsky has long been associated with the National Democratic Institute (NDI), a non-governmental organization headquartered in Washington, D.C., that promotes the development of democratic institutions in burgeoning democracies.  He has monitored five elections for NDI:  Romania (1990), Mexico (2000), Ukraine (2004), and Nigeria (2011 & 2015).  He has conducted seminars on local government finance and democratic institution-building in Russia, Ukraine, Turkey and Bosnia/Herzegovina.

Mr. Yaroslavsky is now the Director of the Los Angeles Initiative at the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs and the Department of History, focusing on the intersection of policy, politics and history of the Los Angeles region.

Mr. Yaroslavsky was born and raised in Los Angeles and earned an M.A. in British Imperial History and a B.A. in Economics and History, both from UCLA.  He is a graduate of Fairfax High School in Los Angeles.

Randall Crane

Randall Crane studies the housing, transportation, and economic development challenges of cities, such as rushed urbanization, urban design/behavior linkages, urban environmental problems, public finances, housing and transportation demographics, and the measure, meaning and governance of sprawl. This work is international, with field experience in China, Colombia, Guyana, Indonesia, Kenya, the Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam, and Yemen, and a Fulbright professorship at the Colegio de México in Mexico City.

His areas of interest are Asia, climate change, community development, economic development, environment, gender issues, housing, international and comparative planning, labor and employment, Latin America, poverty, race and ethnicity, transportation, and urban redevelopment. His current research projects are: (1) the design of municipal taxes, fees, and prices; (2) person-versus place-based economic and community development; (3) Chinese urbanization; (4) the demographics of travel, 1985-2013; and (5) understanding smart growth.

Current Research Projects

The design of municipal taxes, fees and prices. Picking up where I left off in a series of papers in the 1990s on the determinants of the efficient and equitable mix of impact fees, property taxes, and other revenue instruments in theory and practice.

Person-versus place-based economic and community development (with Michael Manville). When are urban development strategies best addressed at geography, and when best aimed at individuals regardless of where they live and work?

Chinese urbanization. A substantial share of the world’s urbanization over the next few decades will be concentrated in China. I am particularly interested in the evolution of public/private governance of land development and the joint issues of suburbanization and CBD development/redevelopment, which come together in increasingly common greenfield CBD construction at the city edge.

The demographics of travel, 1985-present. How do race, age, sex and other social and economic circumstances (such as household formation) influence both the demand for and supply of travel by place, means and purpose? That is, what are the substantive linkages between labor and housing markets over space?

The demographics of US housing, 1985-2013. How have the specific patterns of housing use and conditions changed in US cities over the past two decades, across a broad spectrum of individual and community characteristics? Why?

Understanding smart growth (with Daniel Chatman). What is different, better and worse about so-called smart growth urban development strategies as efforts to address the problems of modern urbanization?  This includes a current project for the state agency responsible for implementing California’s primary climate change legislation, focused on the lessons of various land use strategies (“Analyzing the economic benefits and costs of smart growth,” CARB, 2011-2014).

 

Chaired PhD Committees

Charisma Shonté Acey, PhD (2009) “Exit, voice, loyalty and structural silence: Citizen-consumer access and behavior in Nigeria’s urban water markets,” Professor UC Berkeley

Daniel Chatman, PhD (2005) “How the built environment influences non-work travel: Theoretical and empirical essays,” Professor UC Berkeley

Richard Crepeau, PhD (1995) “Mobility and the metropolis:  Issues of travel and land use in urban America,” Professor Appalachian State University

Lynne Cripe, PhD (1997) “Predictors of community participation in sanitation facility improvement:  Attitudes among female peri-urban residents of Quezon City,” Director The Konterra Group

Thomas H. Culhane, PhD (2010) “Getting into hot water:  Problematizing hot water service demand, The case of old Cairo,” Professor University of South Florida

Priyam Das, PhD (2009) “Promise or compromise?  Community managed water supply for the urban poor in Madhya Pradesh, India,” Professor University of Hawai’i at Mānoa

D. Gregg Doyle, PhD (2003) “‘Only a nobody walks’: The decline of pedestrian trips in the United States,” Consultant

Charles J. Gabbe, PhD (2016) “Do land use regulations matter? Why and how?” Professor Santa Clara University

Michael Heimert, PhD (1988) “Contractual alternatives for durable goods requiring maintenance,” Managing Director and Global Leader, Duff & Phelps, LLC

David Mason, PhD (2011) “Cooperation as collateral? : social capital and joint liability : microfinance group lending in Nicaragua,” The World Bank

Jan Mazurek, PhD (2008) “The politics of counting carbon:  Lessons from the California Climate Action Registry,” Director, ClimateWorks Foundation

Gregory Pierce, PhD (2015) “Basic services, low-income settlements and the local state: How collectively-organized initiatives redress inequalities,” Senior Researcher & Adjunct Professor UCLA

Oscar Alberto Pombo López, PhD (1997) Water, sanitation, and poverty in the Mexican borderlands:  Considerations of water sanitation strategies used by the poor in Tijuana,” Professor El Colegió de la Frontera Norte, Mexico

Lisa Schweitzer, PhD (2004) “Environmental sacrifice zones: Risk and transport in Southern California,” Professor University of Southern California

Hyun-Gun Sung, PhD (2005) “Transit friendly Areas: The role of residential relocation and housing development in rail ridership over time,” Professor Chungbuk National University, Korea

Beth Tamayose, PhD (2011) “Rise of western land and water regulation on the Hawaiian Islands:  An historical analysis of land, property, and water governance, 1840s-1910s,” Consultant

 

Recent and Upcoming Presentations

“Equity and Inclusiveness as Building Blocks for Local Government Planning,” invited, Asian Development Bank Conference, Seoul, Korea, December 2017

”On Planning Smart: Practice, Research and Education,” invited, 10th Year Celebration of the DUPM, Renmin University, Beijing, PRC, September 2017

”UN Sustainable Development Goal 11: Sustainable Cities & Communities,” invited, Sustainability Goals Series, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, May 2017

“Lectures on Urbanization and Development,” invited, University of Sichuan, Chengdu, PRC, July 2015

“Private solutions to basic urban service gaps in Africa,” invited, World Resources Institute, Washington DC, May 2015″

Comparing urban problems and policies in the US and the PRC,” invited, University of Sichuan, Chengdu, PRC, July 2014

Efficient Public Finance in Diverse Cities: Modelling the Choices Amongst Taxes in an Open Economy,” Applied Urban Modelling Conference: Planning Urban Infrastructure, Martin Centre for Architectural and Urban Studies, Cambridge University, April 2014

New Developments in the Economic Modelling of Urban Design,” Applied Urban Modelling Conference: Productive, liveable and sustainable city regions, Centre for Research in the Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities, Cambridge University, June 2013

“Debating the Merits of Planning Research: The Importance of My Asking Questions You Think We Already Have Good Enough Answers To,” annual conference, Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning, Cincinnati, November 2012.

The New Smart Growth: Practice, Education & Research,” Keynote speech, China Urban Planning Education Network Congress, Wuhan University, Wuhan, PRC, September 2012

“Public Private Partnerships in Urban Development: The Case of New Downtowns in China,” Keynote speech, Peking University/Lincoln Institute of Land Policy, Beijing, PRC July 2012

“Competitive Cities & Municipalities,” Mayors’ Forum, Philippine Local Government Academy, Manila, Philippines, January 2012

“The Effect of the New Normal on Local Government Finance,” Growth and Infrastructure Consortium Conference, San Diego, October 2011.

“Private/Public Strategies for the New Chinese Downtowns,” 3rd International Conference on Public Policy and Management, Tsinghua University, Beijing, October 2011.

“Water in Megacities: Solutions,” 2011 Global Economic Symposium, Kiel, Germany, October 2011.

“Commuting in Beijing,” International Association for China Planning Conference, Beijing, June 2011.

“Race, Gender and Sprawl: New Results,” Graduate School of Design, Harvard, April 2011.

The Right to the Suburb?” Graduate School of Design, Harvard University, April 2011.

“Global Challenges and Emerging Opportunities Facing Today’s Cities,” Philippine Urban Consortium, Manila, March 2011.

The Evolution of Public/Private Development: What Works, What Fails, and Why?,” University of Alberta, Edmonton, January 2011.

“Housing and the Built Environment: Shooting at Moving Targets,” Housing and Urbanization: What Housing Scholars Think about the Present and Future of the Field, Harvard Graduate School of Design, Cambridge, December 2010

“Trends in US Housing Consumption: 1985-2007,” annual conference, Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning, Minneapolis, October 2010.

“Downtown Inc. in the New China,” Megacities: Problematizing the Urban, conference of the New Encyclopedia Project, UC Irvine, June 2010.

“Cities and Global Sustainability,” Stumbling Toward Sustainability Lecture Series, Aquarium of the Pacific, Long Beach, May 2010

“Travel Behavior and the Scope for Smart Mobility Policies” Symposium on Smart Mobility, Florida State University, April 2010

“Pricing and Social Equity Challenges in Water,” Pricing and Social Equity: An Unplugged Conversation with the Experts, Keston Institute for Public Finance and Infrastructure Policy, USC, April 2010.

“Advanced Transportation Planning” workshop, 102nd National Planning Conference, APA, New Orleans, April 2010

“Getting, Doing and Debating Freakonomics,” Junior State of America, Pacifica High School, April 2010.

“Global Issues in Transportation Policy,” at The Rosenfield Forum, “Changing Lanes: Bold Ideas to Solve L.A.’s Traffic Problems,” Japanese American National Museum, Los Angeles, March 2010.

“Sources of the Narrowing and Widening of Travel Differences by Gender” TRB 4th International Conference on Women’s Issues in Transportation, Beckman Center, Irvine, October 2009

“Sex Changes Everything: The Recent Narrowing and Widening of Travel Differences by Gender” 50th Anniversary ACSP Conference, Washington, DC, October 2009

“New Downtowns in New China: Renewal, Replacement, or Relocation?” Urban Regeneration Roundtable, China Planning Network Conference, Renmin University, Beijing, June 2009

“Public Policy in Urban Planning,” Urban Planning and Public Policy Roundtable, China Planning Network Conference, Renmin University, Beijing, June 2009

“Does Gender Matter? Changes, Choices and Consequences for Transportation Policy,” Netconference 2009, National Center for Transit Research’s National TDM and Telework Clearinghouse at the University of South Florida, May 2009

“Sex Changes Everything: Trends in the Demographics of the U.S. Commute,” Visiting Scholars Seminar, University Transportation Research Center, The City College of New York, May 2009

“Place-Based versus People-Based Community Economic Development,” Lincoln Lecture Series, Lincoln Institute of Land Policy, Cambridge, Massachusetts, April 2009

“Land Planning for Local Public Finance in China,” Center for Urban Development and Land Policy, Peking University/Lincoln Institute, Beijing, April 2009

“Sex Changes Everything: Trends in the Demographics of the U.S. Commute,” National Center for Smart Growth, University of Maryland College Park, April 2009

“Gender Differences: Travel Trends and Research Issues,” Transportation Research Board Annual Meeting, Washington, DC, January 2009

“Reforming the Public Finance of Land in China,” for the symposium “China’s Three Decades of Urban Planning through an International Perspective,” Urban Planning Society of China, Xiamen, November 2008

Blog Reporter for Re-Imagining Cities: Urban Design After the Age of Oil, University of Pennsylvania, November 2008

“Does Gender Matter? Changes, Choices, and Consequences for Transportation Policy,” TRB Impact of Changing Demographics on the Transportation System Conference, Washington, DC, October 2008

“Urban Regeneration in the New China,” Financial Times Urban Regeneration Summit 2008, Shanghai, PRC, September 2008

“Economic Development and Transportation Access in China,” Chengdu Post-Earthquake Reconstruction Symposium, Chengdu, PRC, July 2008

“The New Fiscalization of Land Use in Chinese Cities,” CPN China Urban Housing Congress, Beijing, July 2008

“Urban Design and Transportation Policy,” Peking University—Lincoln Institute Center for Urban Development and Land Policy, Beijing, July 2008

Roundtables on “Place/People Development Planning” and “The Oxford Handbook of Urban Planning,” and paper on “U.S. Housing Trends, 1985-2005,” ACSP/AESOP Fourth Joint Conference, Chicago, July 2008

“Urban Growth with Chinese Characteristics,” Sino-US Workshop on the Environment and Sustainable Development in China, Natural Resources Defense Council and Global Environmental Institute, Party School of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of China, Beijing, PRC, May 2008

“Smart Growth with Chinese Characteristics,” Workshop on Sustainable Urban Planning for Medium and Small Chinese Cities, Center for Agenda 21 (Ministry of Science and Technology) and Natural Resources Defense Council, Tongling City, PRC, May 2008

“Comments on Revenues in Chinese Urban Public Finance,” Local Public Finance and Property Taxation in China, Lincoln Institute of Land Policy, Cambridge, Massachusetts, May 2008

Mobility and Congestion,” 100th National Planning Conference, APA, Las Vegas, April 2008

Sex and Travel in the USA, 1985-2005,” Annual Meeting of the Association of American Geographers, Boston, April 2008

Smart Growth with Chinese Characteristics: Transportation/Land Use Integration in Urban China,” Harvard China Project, Harvard University, March 2008

Sex, Race and Traffic: What is Changing and Why,” Distinguished Speaker Series, MIT Center for Transportation & Logistics, March 2008

“How Urban Form Affects Travel, Public Health, and Climate Change,” MIT Urban Studies & Planning, March 2008

“Public/Private People/Place Development Strategies,” Harvard Graduate School of Design, March 2008

“Challenges for Smart Growth in China (and the U.S.),” presentation to visiting delegation from the Chinese Academy of Urban Planning & Design, PRC, January 2008

“Sex and Traffic, Etc.,” Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service, NYU, December 2007

Downtown Development in Los Angeles: Planning Obstacles & Opportunities,” Annual UCLA Real Estate Conference, Ziman Center for Real Estate, Skirball Center, Los Angeles, November 2007

“Sex and Commuting, 1985-2005,” Department of Policy, Planning & Design, UC Irvine, October 2007

People-Based Versus Place-Based Economic Development Strategies: A Reconciliation,” ACSP Conference, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, October 2007. (with M. Manville)

“Challenges to Land Use/Transportation Integration in Modern Urban China,” Institute of Transportation Studies/Enjoyor, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, PRC, October 2007

“Smart Growth with Chinese Characteristics,” Third International Symposium on Urban Development and Land Policy in China, Lincoln Institute of Land Policy, Hangzhou, PRC, October 2007

Top 5 Challenges to Integrating Transportation with Land Use in Urban China,” 1st Urban Transportation Conference, China Planning Network, Beijing, August 2007.

Urban Sprawl and the Built Environment,” Invited lecture, Beijing Municipal Institute of City Planning and Design, Beijing, August 2007.

Suburbanization, Sprawl, and the New Mobility,” Seventh International Symposium on Asia Pacific Architecture, School of Architecture, University of Hawai’i at Mānoa, June 2007.

Planeación Urbana y Políticas de Suelo: Puntos de Debate,” Seminario Internacional 10 Años de la Ley 388 de 1997: Sus Aportes al Ordinamiento Urbano y a la Consolidatión de Políticas de Suelo, National Capitol Building, Bogotá, Colombia, May 2007.

Housing and Poverty in the U.S.: New Evidence on What, Who and Why,” Institute of Urban and Regional Development, UC Berkeley, April 2007.

U.S. Housing Affordability and Crowding Trends, 1985-2005,” Annual Meeting of the Association of American Geographers, San Francisco, April 2007.

Is the Gender Gap History?,” University of California Thirteenth Annual Transportation Research Conference, UCLA, February 2007.

Sex, Lies, and Commuting in the US: 1985-2005,” University of Toronto, February 2007.

“New Research on the Journey to Work,” Department of Urban & Regional Planning, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, January 2007.

“Sex, Lies, and the Built Environment,” Department of City & Regional Planning, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, January 2007.

“Growth, Growth Impacts, and Planning for Growth,” Aquarium of the Pacific, Long Beach, December 2006.

“Integrating Land Use and Transportation Planning,” presentation to the Director of the Beijing Municipal Planning Bureau, November 2006.

“Public Economics for Planners,” ACSP Conference, Ft. Worth, Texas, November 2006.

Local Public Finance Reform in China,” Second Annual International Symposium on Urban Planning and Land Policy, Lincoln Institute, Shenzhen, China, October 2006.

Public Finance Concepts for Planners,” Fiscal Dimensions of Planning Seminar, Lincoln Institute of Land Policy, Cambridge, Massachusetts, July 24, 2006.

Housing and Poverty in the USA, 1985-2005,” World Planning Schools Congress, Mexico City, July 14, 2006.

The Rapid Development of China’s Urban Transportation Systems: Opportunities, Challenges and Policies,” China Planning Network 3rd Annual Conference, Beijing, June 14, 2006.

Smart Growth in the U.S. and the Pearl River Delta Region,” World Planning Scholars Lecture 1, China Planning Network, Zhongshan University, Guangzhou, China, June 12, 2006.

Lectures on Land Use,” Lincoln Institute of Land Policy and PRC Ministry of Land Resources, Qingdao, China, June 10-11, 2006.

“Public Finance and Urban Development Strategies in China,” invited, Symposium on Important Issues in the Era of Rapid Urbanization in China, Lincoln Institute of Land Policy, Cambridge, Massachusetts, May 22, 2006.

Formal/Informal: A Perspective on China,” invited, Center for Architecture and People’s Architecture, New York City, May 16, 2006.

“Growth and Growth Impacts in the South San Francisco Bay Area,” invited, Social Science Dimensions Workshop: Identifying Political, Economic, and Social Obstacles and Opportunities, South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project, Mountain View, California, April 18, 2006.

“Sex, Race and Roads: New Research on Shelter and Travel,” invited, Department of City Regional Planning, Cornell University, April 12, 2006.

“Suburbanization and Its Discontents: What We Do and Don’t Know About How to Plan the Built Environment,” invited, Department of Urban Planning, Columbia University, April 10, 2006.

“The American University of Cairo/UCLA Environmental Studies Initiative,” American University of Cairo, Egypt, April 3, 2006.

Smart Growth with Chinese Characteristics,” invited, Changsha University of Science and Technology, Xiantang, and Chinese Academy of Urban Planning and Design, Beijing, China, December 2005.

“Four Lectures on Sprawl, Suburbanization, and Alternatives,” Lincoln Institute of Land Policy Workshop, Changsha, Hunan Province, China, December 2005.

For a Few Dollars Less: Estimating and Regulating the Costs & Benefits of Wal-Mart,” invited, Economic Impact Research Conference: An In-Depth Look at Wal-Mart and Society, Washington DC, November 2005. (with D. Chatman)

“3 Questions for the American Housing Survey, 1985-2003,” invited, Ziman Center for Real Estate, UCLA, November 2005.

“Is the Gender Gap History? Commuting in America,” ACSP, Kansas City, October 2005.

Emerging Planning Trends in Retail: The Case of Wal-Mart,” invited, Urban Growth Seminar, USC, September 2005. (with M. Manville)

“Housing Affordability, Regulatory Obstacles, and Smart Growth,” invited, Annual Real Estate Conference, Ziman Center for Real Estate, UCLA, September 2005.

“Traffic and Mobility: FAQ,” 2005 Corporate Partners Summit, Bren School of Environmental Science & Management, UC Santa Barbara, May 2005.

Urban Development & Foreign Models in the New China,” ChinaPlan Conference, MIT, May 2005.

 

Selected Publications

People or Place?
Author: Crane, Randall and Michael Manville
Subtitle: Revisiting the Who Versus the Where of Urban Development
Description: One of the longest standing debates in community economic development is between “place-based” and “people-based” approaches to combating poverty, housing affordability, chronic unemployment, and community decline. Should help go to distressed places or distressed people?
Publication Link: PDF

Planning for accessibility
Description: “Planning for accessibility,” in G. Hack, E. Birch, P. Sedway and M. Silver, eds., Local Planning: Contemporary Principles and Practice, ICMA, 2009. (with L. Takahashi)
Publication Link: ICMA

Counterpoint: Accessibility and sprawl
Description: “Counterpoint: Accessibility and sprawl,” Journal of Transport and Land Use 1:1, Summer 2008.
Publication Link: Journal of Transport and Land Use

 

Other Publications

Public Finance Concepts for Urban Planners,” in S. White and N. Kotval, eds. Financing Economic Development in the 21st Century, M.E. Sharpe, 2013.

The Oxford Handbook of Urban Planning, Oxford University Press, 2012 (Co-edited with Rachel Weber)

Planning as Scholarship: Origins and Prospects,” in R. Weber and R. Crane, eds., The Oxford Handbook of Urban Planning, Oxford Univ. Press, 2012 (with R. Weber)

Toward a Second Generation of Land-Use/Travel Studies: Theoretical and Empirical Frontiers,” in N. Brooks, K. Donaghy and G. Knaap, eds., The Oxford Handbook of Urban Economics and Planning, Oxford Univ. Press, 2012 (with Z. Guo)

Planning for Climate Change: Assessing Progress and Challenges,” Journal of the American Planning Association 76, 2010, pp. 389-401(with J. Landis)

Sex Changes Everything: The Recent Narrowing and Widening of Travel Differences by Gender,” Public Works Management & Policy 13, 2009, 328-337. (with L. Takahashi)

 

“Is there a quiet revolution in women’s travel? Revisiting the gender gap in commuting,” Journal of the American Planning Association 73, Summer, pp. 298-316, 2007.

Public finance challenges for Chinese urban development,” in Y. Song and C. Ding, eds. Urbanization in China: Critical Issues in an Era of Rapid Growth. Cambridge: Lincoln Institute of Land Policy, 2007

Emerging planning challenges in retail: The case of Wal-Mart,” Journal of the American Planning Association 71, Autumn 2005. (with M. Boarnet, D. Chatman and M. Manville).

Central-local transfers in Kenya – Options for incremental reform,” International Development Planning Review 26 (1), February 2004.

Supercenters and the Transformation of the Bay Area Grocery Industry: Issues, Trends, and Impacts. San Francisco: Bay Area Economic Forum. (with M. Boarnet, D. Chatman and M. Manville), 2004.

“Transport in the urban core,” in D. Hensher, et al., eds. Handbook of Transport Geography and Spatial Systems. Elsevier, 2004. (with E. Blumenberg)

“Job sprawl and the journey to work in the USA,” in Chang-Hee Christine Bae and Harry W. Richardson, eds. Urban Sprawl in Western Europe and the United States. London: Ashgate, 2004. (with D. Chatman)

“Decentralizing Indonesia in 2004: Implications and recommendations for basic education,” RTI/USAID Report, November 2004.

As jobs sprawl, whither the commute?Access 23, 2003 (with D. Chatman)

Traffic and sprawl: Evidence for U.S. commuting, 1985 to 1997,” Planning & Markets 6 (1), September 2003. (with D. Chatman)

Transport and sustainability: The role of the built environment,” Built Environment 29 (3), 2003. (with L. Schweitzer)

Travel by Design: The Influence of Urban Form on Travel, Oxford University Press, 2001. (with M. Boarnet)

The influence of land use on travel behavior: Estimation and specification issues,” Transportation Research A 35, 2001. (with M. Boarnet)

The impacts of urban form on travel: An interpretive review,” Journal of Planning Literature 15, pp. 3-23, August 2000.

“A study to prepare urban development and management strategies for the City of Taiz, Yemen,” Ministry of Housing, Construction and Urban Planning, Government of Yemen and the World Bank, August 2000.

“A study to prepare urban development and management strategies for the City of Sana’a, Yemen,” Ministry of Housing, Construction and Urban Planning, Government of Yemen and the World Bank, August 2000.

Public finance and transit-oriented planning: Evidence from Southern California,Journal of Planning Education and Research 17, 1998. (with M. Boarnet)

Who are the suburban homeless and what do they want? An empirical study of the demand for public services,” Journal of Planning Education and Research 18, 1998. (with L. Takahashi)

Travel by Design?Access 12, 1998.

L.A. Story: A reality check for transit-based housing,” Journal of the American Planning Association 63, Spring 1997. (with M. Boarnet)

The contributions of environmental amenities to low income housing: A comparative study of Bangkok and Jakarta,” Urban Studies 34, pp. 1495-1512, 1997. (with A. Daniere and S. Harwood)

Does neighborhood design influence travel? A behavioral analysis of travel diary and GIS data,”Transportation Research D: Transport and Environment 3, pp. 225-238, 1998. (with R. Crepeau)

Measuring access to basic services in global cities: Descriptive and behavioral approaches,” Journal of the American Planning Association 62, Spring 1996. (with A. Daniere)

The influence of uncertain job location on urban form and the journey to work,” Journal of Urban Economics 39, 1996.

Cars and drivers in the new suburbs: Linking access to travel in neotraditional planning,” Journal of the American Planning Association 62, Winter 1996.

Efficient local charity with self selection,” Public Choice 86, 1996.

On form versus function: Will the New Urbanism reduce traffic, or increase it?,” Journal of Planning Education and Research 15, 1996.

The market value of environmental improvements in alternative fiscal regimes,” Journal of Regional Science 35, 1995.

Mexico City’s Water Supply: Improving the Outlook for Sustainability, A National Research Council Report of the Joint Academies Committee on the Mexico City Water Supply. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press, 1995.

Water markets, market reform, and the urban poor: Results from Jakarta, Indonesia,” World Development 22, 1994.

Brian D. Taylor

Brian Taylor’s research centers on transportation policy and planning – most of it conducted in close collaboration with his many exceptional students.  His students have won dozens of local and national awards for their work, and today hold positions at the highest levels of planning analysis, teaching, and practice. More of his students have won awards from the Council of University Transportation Centers for the best capstone project, thesis, or dissertation in transportation policy and planning than have the students of any other faculty member in North America.

Professor Taylor explores how society pays for transportation systems and how these systems in turn serve the needs of people who – because of low income, disability, location, or age – have lower levels of mobility.  Topically, his research examines travel behavior, transportation economics & finance, and politics & planning.

His research on travel behavior has examined (1) the effect of travel experience on cognitive mapping, (2) how travel patterns vary by race/ethnicity, sex, age, and income, (3) the emerging travel patterns teens and young adults, (4) gender divisions of labor and travel in gay and straight households, (5) the social, economic, and spatial factors explaining public transit use, (6) the role of walking, waiting, and transferring on travel choices, (7) ways to cost-effectively increase public transit use, and (8) the role of information technology in the rise of new shared mobility systems.

A principal focus of his research is the politics of transportation economics & finance, including (1) alternative ways to evaluate the access and economic effects of traffic congestion on people, firms, and regional economies, (2) the history of freeway planning and finance, (3) emerging trends in pricing road use, (4) the equity of alternative forms of transportation pricing and finance, (5) linking of subsidies to public transit performance, and (6) measuring equity in public transit finance.

The politics of planning practice inform Professor Taylor’s research and teaching, which regularly include courses on Transportation and Land Use: Urban FormTransportation Policy and Planning, Transportation Economics, Finance, and Policy, courses in research design for planners, and, occasionally, the Comparative International Transportation Workshop. Prior to joining the UCLA faculty in 1994, Professor Taylor was on the planning faculty at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and before that he was a planner with Metropolitan Transportation Commission in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Professor Taylor has won numerous honors for his work. He was recently named one of the Top Ten Academic Thought Leaders in Transportation by the Council of University Transportation Centers and the Eno Center for Transportation. He was also recently honored as a National Associate by the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine for his work on behalf of the Transportation Research Board.  And he was recently elected to the College of Fellows by the American Institute of Certified Planners for his exceptional contributions to planning and society.

 

Some recent publications (current and former student co-authors listed in italics)

Transportation Equity

Brown, Anne and Brian D. Taylor. 2018. “Bridging the Gap between Mobility Haves and Have-Nots,” in Three Revolutions: Steering Automated, Shared, and Electric Vehicles to a Better Future, Daniel Sperling, Editor. Washington DC: Island Press. Pages 131-150.

Lederman, Jaimee, Anne Brown, Brian D. Taylor, and Martin Wachs. 2018. “Arguing over Transportation Sales Taxes: An Analysis of Equity Debates in Transportation Ballot Measures,” Urban Affairs Review, (October): 1-16.

Smart, Michael J., Anne Brown, and Brian D. Taylor. 2017. “Sex or Sexuality? Analyzing the Division of Labor and Travel in Gay, Lesbian, and Straight Households,” Travel Behaviour and Society, 6(2017): 75-82.

Lederman, Jaimee, Brian D. Taylor, and Mark Garrett. 2016. “A Private Matter: The Implications of Privacy Regulations for Intelligent Transportation Systems,” Transportation Planning & Technology, 39(2):115-135.

Taylor, Brian D. and Eric A. Morris. 2015. “Public transportation objectives and rider demographics:   Are transit’s priorities poor public policy?Transportation, 42(2): 347-367.

Taylor, Brian D., Kelcie Ralph, and Michael Smart. 2015. “What Explains the Gender Gap in Schlepping? Testing Various Explanations for Gender Differences in Household-Serving Travel,” Social Science Quarterly, 96(5): 1493-1510.

Schweitzer, Lisa and Brian D. Taylor. 2010. “Just Road Pricing,” Access, 36: 2-7.

Taylor, Brian D. and Rebecca Kalauskas. 2010. “Addressing Equity in Political Debates over Road Pricing: Lessons from Recent Projects,” Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, 2187: 44-52.

Taylor, Brian D. and Alexandra T. Norton. 2009. “Paying for Transportation: What’s a Fair Price?Journal of Planning Literature, 24(1): 22-36.

Schweitzer, Lisa and Brian D. Taylor. 2008. “Just pricing: The distributional effects of congestion pricing and sales taxes,” Transportation, 35(6): 797-812.

 

Millennials and Travel

Blumenberg, Evelyn, Anne Brown, Kelcie Ralph, Brian D. Taylor, and Carole Turley Voulgaris.  2019.  “A resurgence in urban living? Trends in residential location patterns of young and older adults since 2000,” Urban Geography, published online, April.

Blumenberg, Evelyn and Brian D. Taylor. 2018. “Millennial Travel: Who Knows About Kids These Days? Sweeping conclusions about the location and travel desires of millennials may be premature,” Transfers, 1: 1-6.

Turley, Carole Voulgaris, Michael J. Smart, and Brian D. Taylor. 2017. “Tired of Commuting? Relationships among Journeys to School, Sleep, and Exercise among American Teenagers,” Journal of Planning Education and Research, 39(2): 1-13.

Ralph, Kelcie, Carole Turley Voulgaris, Anne Brown, Evelyn Blumenberg, and Brian D. Taylor. 2016. “Millennials, built form, and travel: Insights from a nationwide typology of U.S. neighborhoods,” Journal of Transport Geography, 57(December 2016): 218–226.

Blumenberg, Evelyn, Kelcie Ralph, Michael Smart, and Brian D. Taylor. 2016. “Who Knows About Kids These Days? Analyzing the Determinants of Youth and Adult Mobility in the U.S. between 1990 and 2009,” Transportation Research, Part A: Policy and Practice, 93(November 2016): 39-54.

 

Reigniting Public Transit

Manville, Michael, Brian D. Taylor, and Evelyn Blumenberg. 2018. “Transit in the 2000s: Where Does It Stand and Where Is It Headed?.” Journal of Public Transportation, 21 (1): 104-118.

Shockley, Daniel B., Julia Salinas, and Brian D. Taylor. 2016. “Making Headways: An Analysis of Smart Cards and Bus Dwell Time in Los Angeles,” Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, 2539(05): 40-47.

Brown, Anne, Evelyn Blumenberg, Brian D. Taylor, Kelcie Ralph, and Carole Turley Voulgaris. 2016. “A Taste for Transit? Analyzing Public Transit Use Trends Among Youth,” Journal of Public Transportation, 19(1): 49-67.

Yoh, Allison, Brian D. Taylor, and John Gahbauer. 2015. “Does Transit Mean Business? Reconciling Economic, Organizational, and Political Perspectives on Variable Transit Fares,” Public Works Management & Policy, 21(2): 157-172.

Taylor, Brian D. and Camille N.Y. Fink. 2013. “Explaining transit ridership: What has the evidence shown?Transportation Letters: The International Journal of Transportation Research, 5(1): 15-26.

Iseki, Hiroyuki, Michael Smart, Brian D. Taylor, and Allison Yoh. 2012. “Thinking Outside the Bus,” Access, 40: 9-15.

Yoh, Allison, Hiroyuki Iseki, Michael Smart, and Brian D. Taylor. 2012. “Hate to Wait: Effects of Wait  Time on Public Transit Travelers’ Perceptions,” Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, 2216: 116-124.

Iseki, Hiroyuki and Brian D. Taylor. 2010. “Style versus Service? An Analysis of User Perceptions of Transit Stops and Stations,” Journal of Public Transportation, 13(3): 39-63.

Iseki, Hiroyuki and Brian D. Taylor. 2009. “Not All Transfers Are Created Equal: Towards a Framework Relating Transfer Connectivity to Travel Behaviour,” Transport Reviews, 29(6): 777-800.

Taylor, Brian D., Douglas Miller, Hiroyuki Iseki, and Camille Fink. 2009. “Nature and/or nurture? Analyzing the determinants of transit ridership across U.S. urbanized areas,” Transportation Research, Part A: Policy and Practice, 43(1): 60-77.

 

Cities, Roads, Travel, and Congestion

Osman, Taner, Trevor Thomas, Andrew Mondschein, and Brian D. Taylor. 2018. “Does Traffic Congestion Influence the Location of New Business Establishments? An Analysis of the San Francisco Bay Area,” Urban Studies, 56(5) 1026-1041.

Thomas, Trevor, Andrew Mondschein, Taner Osman, and Brian D. Taylor. 2018. “Not so fast? Examining neighborhood level effects of traffic congestion on job access,” Transportation Research, Part A: Policy and Practice, 113(July): 529-541.

Mondschein, Andrew and Brian D. Taylor. 2017. “Is traffic congestion overrated? Examining the highly variable effects of congestion on travel and accessibility,” Journal of Transport Geography, 64(October): 65-76.

Voulgaris, Carole Turley, Brian D. Taylor, Evelyn Blumenberg, Anne Brown, and Kelcie Ralph. 2017. “Synergistic Neighborhood Relationships with Travel Behavior: An Analysis of Travel in 30,000 U.S. Neighborhoods,” Journal of Transport and Land Use, 10(2): 1-25.

Brown, Anne, Brian D. Taylor, and Martin Wachs. 2016. “The Boy Who Cried Wolf? Media

 Messaging and Traveler Responses to “Carmageddon” in Los Angeles,” Public Works Management & Policy, 22(3): 275 –293.

Morris, Eric A, Jeffrey R. Brown, and Brian D. Taylor. 2016. “Negotiating a Financial Package for  Freeways: California’s 1947 Collier-Burns Highway Act and the Creation of Highway Trust Funds,” Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, 2552(03): 16-22.  [Selected by the Transportation Research Board for the 2016 Charley V. Wootan Award as the best paper in transportation policy and organization]

Lederman, Jaimee, Mark Garrett, and Brian D. Taylor. 2016. “Fault-y Reasoning: Navigating the Liability Terrain in Intelligent Transportation Systems,” Public Works Management & Policy,   21(1): 5-27.

Mondschein, Andrew, Evelyn Blumenberg, and Brian D. Taylor. 2010. “Accessibility and Cognition: The Effect of Transport Mode on Spatial Knowledge,” Urban Studies, 47(4): 845-866.

Brown, Jeffrey R., Eric A. Morris, and Brian D. Taylor. 2009. “Planning for Cars in Cities: Planners, Engineers, and Freeways in the 20th Century,” Journal of the American Planning Association, Special Centennial Issue, 75(2): 161-177.  [Translated into Mandarin and reprinted in 2010 in Urban Transport of China, 8(1): 81-94.]

Taylor, Brian D., Eugene J. Kim, and John E. Gahbauer. 2009. “The Thin Red Line: A Case Study of Political Influence on Transportation Planning Practice,” Journal of Planning Education and Research, 29(2): 173-193.

Evelyn Blumenberg

Evelyn Blumenberg is the Director of the Lewis Center for Regional Policy Studies and an Urban Planning professor within the Luskin School of Public Affairs.

Her research examines the effects of urban structure — the spatial location of residents, employment, and services — on economic outcomes for low-wage workers, and on the role of planning and policy in shaping the spatial structure of cities.

Professor Blumenberg’s recent projects include analyses of trends in transit ridership, gender and travel behavior, low-wage workers and the changing commute, and the relationship between automobile ownership and employment outcomes among the poor.

Professor Blumenberg was honored in 2014 as a White House Champion of Change for her research on the links between transportation access, employment, and poverty.

Professor Blumenberg holds a bachelor’s degree in political science from the University of California, Berkeley, and a master’s degree and Ph.D. in urban planning from the University of California, Los Angeles.

She teaches courses on planning history and theory, research design, poverty and inequality, transportation and poverty, and urban policy.

RECENT WORK

Journal Articles

1. Blumenberg, Evelyn and Hannah King (forthcoming).  “Low-Income Workers, Residential Location, and the Changing Commute in the U.S.,” Built Environment.

 

2. Blumenberg, Evelyn, Andrew Schouten, Miriam Pinski, and Martin Wachs (2019).  “Physical Accessibility and Employment among Older Adults in California,” Journal of the Transportation Research Board, June.

 

3. Blumenberg, Evelyn, Anne Brown, Kelcie Ralph, Brian D. Taylor, and Carole Turley Vougaris (2019).  “A resurgence in urban living? Trends in residential location patterns of young and older adults since 2000,” Urban Geography.

 

4. Blumenberg, Evelyn, Anne Brown, and Andrew Schouten (2018).  “Car-Deficit Household: Determinants and Implications for Household Travel,” Transportation.

 

5. Morris, Eric A., Andrew Mondschein, and Evelyn Blumenberg (2018).  “Is Bigger Better? Metropolitan Area Population, Access, Activity Participation, and Quality of Life,” Journal of Transport and Land Use, 11(1), http://dx.doi.org/10.5198/jtlu.2018.934

 

6. Blumenberg, Evelyn and Gregory Pierce (2017).  “Car Access and Long-Term Poverty Exposure: Evidence from the Moving to Opportunity (MTO) Experiment,” Journal of Transport Geography, 65:  92-100.

 

7.  Voulgaris, Carole Turley, Brian D. Taylor, Evelyn Blumenberg, Anne Brown, and Kelcie Ralph (2017).  “Synergistic Neighborhood Relationships with Travel Behavior: An Analysis of Travel in 30,000 U.S. Neighborhoods,” Journal of Transport and Land Use, 10(2):  1-25.

 

8. Blumenberg, Evelyn and Gregory Pierce (2017).  “The Drive to Work:  The Relationship between Transportation Access, Housing Assistance and Employment among Participants in the Welfare to Work Voucher Program,” Journal of Planning Education and Research., 37(1):  66-82.

 

9. Ralph, Kelcie, Carole Turley Voulgaris, Brian D. Taylor, Evelyn Blumenberg, and Anne Brown (2016).  “Millennials, built form, and travel insights from a nationwide typology of U.S. neighborhoods,” Journal of Transport Geography, 57:  218-226.

 

10. Blumenberg, Evelyn, Kelcie Ralph, Michael Jon Smart, and Brian D. Taylor (2016).  “Who Knows about Kids these Days?  Analyzing the Determinants of Youth and Adult Mobility in the U.S. between 1990 and 2009,” Transportation Research Part A Policy and Practice 93:39-54.

 

11. Blumenberg, Evelyn (2016).  “Why Low-Income Women in the U.S. Still Need Automobiles,” Town Planning Review, 87(5):  525-545.

 

12. Brown, Anne, Evelyn Blumenberg, Brian D. Taylor, Carole Turley Voulgaris, and Kelcie Ralph (2016).  “A Taste for Transit? Analyzing Public Transit Use Trends among Youth,” Journal of Public Transportation, 19(1):  49-67.

 

13. Blumenberg, Evelyn and Trevor Thomas (2014).  “Travel Behavior of the Poor Post-Welfare Reform,” Journal of the Transportation Research Board. 2452:  53-61.

 

14. Blumenberg, Evelyn and Asha Weinstein Agrawal (2014).  “Getting Around When You’re Just Getting By: Transportation Survival Strategies of the Poor” Journal of Poverty, 18:  355-378.

 

15.  Blumenberg, Evelyn and Gregory Pierce (2014).  “A Driving Factor in Mobility?  Transportation’s Role in Connecting Subsidized Housing and Employment Outcomes in the Moving to Opportunity (MTO) Program,” Journal of the American Planning Association, 80(1):  52-66.

 

16. Blumenberg, Evelyn and Gregory Pierce (2014).  “Multimodal Travel and the Poor: Evidence from the 2009 National Household Travel Survey,” Transportation Letters. 6(1):  36-45, January. 

 

17. Evelyn Blumenberg and Michael Smart (2014).  “Brother Can You Spare a Ride?  Carpooling in Immigrant Neighborhoods,” Urban Studies, 51(9), 1871-1890.