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Seeking Freedom in the Streets of Kampala

Global Public Affairs (GPA) at UCLA Luskin hosted an Oct. 31 presentation by Ssembatya Fred, a grassroots activist from Kampala, Uganda, who leads the movement Dembe Ku Kubo (Freedom in the Streets). Fred has been at UCLA this fall working with Amy Ritterbusch, assistant professor of social welfare, on “Violence Against Street-Connected Children in Uganda,” a participatory action research initiative. His fight, he said, is for justice and freedom from violence against youths living under the tyrannical regime of Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni. Fred told of having a nail driven through his foot in his own home when he was in his early teens, an experience that sent him into the life of a freedom fighter. He said he took to the streets for his own safety, as thousands of other young people in Kampala have done, despite the availability of other housing options. Fred returned to Kampala on Nov. 1 to continue the work of keeping young activists safe, primarily from police violence. “Sometimes the most important thing they need is for a safe place to take a long sleep,” he told the GPA gathering. Dembe Ku Kubo was established to provide these necessities and also promote youth involvement in the ongoing political opposition movement. — John Danly

 Watch Fred’s new music video Against Violence (in collaboration with Colombian artist Siere).


 

Making Connections at Fall Internship Fair

Fifty-five employers from the public, private and nonprofit sectors gathered at the UCLA Faculty Center on Nov. 5 to meet Luskin School graduate students seeking real-world experience through internships. More than 30 UCLA Luskin alumni were among the employers who came to the Fall Internship Fair to recruit student interns for positions beginning in January. From the public sector, local municipalities were well-represented, along with agencies at the county, state and federal levels. Planners, consultants and communications experts from the private sector were joined by nonprofits engaged in health, housing, immigration, families and racial equity, among other issues. The Fall Internship Fair focused on the Luskin School’s public policy and urban planning students; social welfare students are placed in yearlong internships at the beginning of the academic year. The fair is one of several programs organized by UCLA Luskin Career Services to prepare graduate students for a competitive job market. In April, a Career Fair and Alumni Networking Event will bring employers together with students from all three graduate programs who are pursuing job opportunities.

View more photos from the Fall Internship Fair on Flickr.

Peterson on ‘Medicare for All’: Balancing Ambition and Statecraft

The November issue of the American Journal of Public Health features an article authored by Public Policy Professor Mark Peterson on the debate surrounding government-run “Medicare for All” healthcare coverage. The article, “Enacting Medicare for All: Balancing Ambition With the Needs of Statecraft,” highlights the leadership and coalition-building skills necessary to enact Medicare for All. Peterson draws on his practical experience as a legislative assistant for health policy in the office of South Dakota Democratic Sen. Tom Daschle during the 1990s as well as extensive research on the politics of health reform. Peterson is currently working on a new manuscript, “American Sisyphus: Health Care and the Challenge of Transformative Policymaking,” that explores public attitudes, interest group dynamics and leadership contexts over the past 100 years. He argues that “2009 to 2010 during the Obama presidency was the most advantageous political setting in U.S. history for comprehensive health care reform” and points to the U.S. Senate as “the biggest stumbling block” of the politics of reform in the United States. Looking to the 2020 presidential election, Peterson highlights the lack of clarity surrounding the topic of Medicare for All, which he explains “means different things to different people.” According to Peterson, the idea of Medicare for All is “motivational poetry for many” but actual implementation requires adaptation and skilled coalition-building. Peterson concludes by recommending that “candidates with the shared commitment to universal coverage avoid forming a circular firing squad, both on the campaign trail and once in office.” 


Building Community Through Food, Fun and Creative Costumery

A record 130-plus UCLA Luskin graduate students attended this year’s Luskin Halloween Party, co-hosted by the Association of MPP Students, the MSW Student Alliance and the Urban Planning Student Association. Guests enjoyed fellowship, food and drink, creative costumery and music courtesy of UCLA Luskin’s favorite DJ alumna, Caroline Calderon MURP ’19. The Halloween gathering is typically the most ambitious cross-departmental student government effort of the year at the Luskin School. But it was more than just a night of fun among friends and classmates, said staff liaison Kevin Franco, the admissions and advising officer for Public Policy. “I often get asked by prospective students what makes our program so unique. Aside from the obvious response about our curriculum and resources, I often talk to them about how as a department we are intentional in building community through our student-run organizations,” Franco said. At the Halloween Party, he said, “I saw community come together and build camaraderie, an essential factor in creating a positive graduate experience.” — John Danly

View more photos from the 2019 Luskin Halloween Party.

 

Waging a Battle Against Environmental Injustice

Global Public Affairs (GPA) at UCLA Luskin welcomed Vivek Maru, founder and CEO of the legal advocacy nonprofit Namati, to campus on Oct. 24. In his talk entitled “The Global Struggle for Environmental Justice,” Maru shared three stories of local people — smallholder farmers in Sierra Leone, fisher people on the coast of India and families in an industrial zone of Baltimore — who used the law to stand up to industries polluting their communities. Their work was supported by Namati, which trains and deploys community paralegals around the world to help people understand and exercise their legal rights. Maru said isolated incidents can lead to great change in policies and systems. He stressed the importance of the “legal empowerment cycle,” in which grassroots experiences can trigger systemic change. Namati, founded in 2011, convenes the Global Legal Empowerment Network, more than 2,000 groups and 7,000 individuals from all over the world. Members collaborate on common challenges, such as enforcing environmental law and securing basic rights to healthcare and citizenship. More information about Maru’s work is available in a free e-book, published by Cambridge University Press. — John Danly

An advocate from Namati speaks with members of a community in Mozambique about their rights. Photo courtesy of Namati

ACSP Honors Umemoto for Leadership, Integrity, Solidarity

The Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning (ACSP) has honored Urban Planning Professor Karen Umemoto as the winner of the 2019 Marcia Feld Award for Outstanding Leadership. At the group’s annual conference, held Oct. 24-27 in Greenville, South Carolina, the ACSP honored faculty and students who have distinguished themselves or made major contributions to the planning profession. Every other year, the Marcia Feld Award recognizes a Faculty Women’s Interest Group colleague for outstanding leadership within the ACSP organization. “Quietly, with great talent and courage, [Umemoto] made an indelible mark on the organization and its ability to respond to the challenge of diversity,” said the awards committee, which described her as a “beacon of integrity and solidarity and an agent of positive change.” Although Umemoto was unable to attend the conference, she expressed her gratitude for the award and commented, “Each generation lifts up the next, and I’m very grateful to so many people who have helped me both professionally and personally.” Umemoto said she hopes that the award elevates the importance of research on diversity. A recent UCLA Luskin graduate was also recognized at the conference. Esteban Doyle MURP ’19 received the 2019 Ed McClure Award for Best Master Student Paper, which recognizes superior scholarship in a paper prepared by a master student in an ACSP member school. Doyle’s paper, “The Unequal Dangers of Walking to School,” presented a quantitative analysis of child pedestrian and bicycle crashes in Los Angeles and related their occurrence to neighborhood and built environment characteristics. 


Remembering Zeke Hasenfeld’s Intellectual Generosity

Former colleagues, students and friends of Yeheskel “Zeke” Hasenfeld gathered at the Annenberg Community Beach House in Santa Monica on Oct. 11 to honor his life and reflect on the profound influence the professor emeritus had on those around him. Hasenfeld passed away on Feb. 28, 2019, leaving a legacy as a generous mentor, gifted communicator and a pioneer in the study of human service. After three decades at UCLA, Hasenfeld retired in 2014 but remained connected as a researcher and mentor. Among those who spoke at the memorial was Professor Laura Abrams, chair of UCLA Luskin Social Welfare, who has “fond memories of Zeke, who graced the halls of UCLA with his kindness and the rare intellectualism that made him a true social work legend.” Fernando Torres-Gil, professor of social welfare and public policy, remembers Hasenfeld’s infectious joie de vivre and a sense of life that never wavered. In remembrances shared during the memorial, former colleagues recalled his penchant for challenging them intellectually over the years, and former students expressed their gratitude for Hasenfeld’s deep trust in the capacity of students to do good work that matters. Several speakers at the memorial noted Hasenfeld’s devotion to family, and the pleasure he took in talking about his children and grandchildren. One of his daughters, Rena Garland, thanked the Luskin School for hosting the memorial, saying it gave her a deeper understanding of her father’s academic research and accomplishments. Also speaking at the memorial from UCLA Luskin were Professor Emeritus A.E. “Ted” Benjamin, Professor Emerita Aurora P. Jackson and alumna Sara Terrana, as well as other former colleagues and students who came forward to share memories at the memorial. Thomas Brock, a former student of Hasenfeld at the University of Michigan, and Michalle Mor Barak, a professor at USC and personal friend of Hasenfeld, attended the memorial and offered their remarks, and video tributes were provided by four other former students and colleagues.

A memoriam to Hasenfeld’s life and career can be found here.

View a Flickr album of the memorial.

Students Reflect on International Summer Fellowships

Global Public Affairs (GPA) at UCLA Luskin provided financial support and helped secure placements for eight graduate students to work in low- and middle-income countries this past summer. Student placements spanned the globe, from as close as Mexico City to as far as Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Olivia Miller, a second-year MSW candidate, spent the summer in Bogota, Colombia, conducting fieldwork related to transgender rights, including help in organizing the grassroots Trans Pride March. “I decidedly spent [my] first weeks dedicating myself to a contributive role, recognizing the chaos of the march preparation, and putting at the center the development of my relationships with the social justice activists on the frontlines of this movement,” she wrote on the GPA blog. Urban Planning students who participated in the summer International Practice Pathway (IPP) program gained experience in transportation and infrastructure. Liliana Morales, a 2020 MURP candidate, interned with the planning department at the Ministry of Mobility in Mexico City. “I feel incredibly fortunate to have worked with professionals that are passionate and dedicated to mobility justice,” she wrote. “Mexico City is working toward improving quality of life, reducing social inequalities, diminishing gas emissions and increasing productivity through a comprehensive system that guarantees decent and safe trips for all residents.” GPA, led by Professor Michael Storper and associate director Stephen Commins, is already getting ready for its next cohort of IPP fellows, as more than 60 new UCLA Luskin students attended the fall 2019 orientation lunch. — John Danly

Read more about students’ summer fellowships on the GPA blog.

Face to Face With Would-Be Presidents

A large UCLA Luskin contingent came face to face with a field of Democratic presidential candidates at a town hall in downtown Los Angeles that focused on LGBTQ rights. Students, faculty and staff from the School were among 160 UCLA guests invited by the Human Rights Campaign Foundation, sponsors of the “Power of Our Pride” event broadcast live by CNN on Thursday, Oct. 10. Public affairs pre-major Ayse Seker was one of several students and staff selected to pose questions to the candidates. “How would you address the at times juxtaposing issues of religious freedom and LGBTQ rights?” Seker asked of candidate Cory Booker. Citing his own faith, Booker replied that he could not allow religion to be used as a justification for discrimination. Other staff and students invited to address the candidates included undergraduate Brandon Broukhim, public policy graduate student Tamera Hyatte and Kevin Medina, experiential learning advisor for the undergraduate program in public affairs. Candidates present at the forum included former Vice President Joe Biden, Mayor Pete Buttigieg, former Secretary Julian Castro, Sen. Kamala Harris, Sen. Amy Klobuchar, former Congressman Beto O’Rourke, investor and activist Tom Steyer and Sen. Elizabeth Warren. The town hall, held on the eve of National Coming Out Day, marked the first time a major cable news network aired a presidential event devoted to issues of importance to the LGBTQ community.