Arturo Vargas Bustamante

Arturo Vargas Bustamante is an Associate Professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health. He has a broad background in health policy, with specific training and expertise in health care survey research and data analysis, health care cost estimation, economic valuation and program evaluation. His research investigates unexplored or underexplored topics on access to health care, predominantly among Latinos/Hispanics and immigrants in the United States. He also specializes in the comparative analyses of health care delivery systems in Latin American countries. His research has been published in reputable health policy journals such as Health AffairsHealth Services ResearchSocial Science and Medicine, the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, among others. The outcomes of his research have had direct policy applications, particularly since they estimate the share of disparities that can be attributed to socioeconomic and demographic factors and the corresponding part associated to health system variables, such as usual source of care and insurance status.

Professor Vargas Bustamante holds a PhD (2008) in Public Policy, an M.A. (2006) in Economics and an M.P.P. (2004) all from UC-Berkeley. As part of his professional experience, he worked as a consultant for the Inter-American Development Bank and for the California Program on Access to Care. Before he worked for the Health Care Financing Administration of the Mexican Ministry of Health.

Selected Courses:

HPM 200 Health Care Organization and Financing

HPM 206 Health Care for Vulnerable Populations

HPM 226 Readings in Health Services Research

Selected Publications:

1. Contributions to U.S. Latino/Hispanic Health Care Research:

Vargas Bustamante A, Fang H, Rizzo JA, Ortega AN. Understanding observed and unobserved health care access and utilization disparities among US Latino adultsMedical Care Research & Review, 2009;66(5):561-77.

Vargas Bustamante A, Fang H, Rizzo JA, Ortega AN. Heterogeneity in health insurance coverage among US Latino adults. Journal of General Internal Medicine, 2009;24 Suppl 3:561-6.

Vargas Bustamante A, Chen J, Rodriguez HP, Rizzo JA, Ortega AN.  Use of preventive care services among Latino subgroups. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 2010;38(6):610-9.

Vargas Bustamante A, Chen J. Physicians cite hurdles ranging from lack of coverage to poor communication in providing high-quality care to latinos. Health Affairs, 2011;30(10):1921-9.

2. Contributions to U.S. Immigrant Health Care Research:

Vargas Bustamante A, Chen J.  The great recession and health spending among uninsured U.S. citizens and non-citizens: implications for the afffordable care act implementationHealth Services Research, 2014 Dec;49(6):1900-24.

Vargas Bustamante A, Fang H, Garza J, Carter-Pokras O, Wallace SP, Rizzo JA, et al. Variations in healthcare access and utilization among Mexican immigrants: the role of documentation status. Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health / Center for Minority Public Health, 2012;14(1):146-55.

Vargas Bustamante A, Chen J, Health expenditure dynamics and years of U.S. residence: analyzing spending disparities among Latinos by citizenship/nativity status. Health Services Research, 2012;47(2):794-818.

Chen J, Vargas-Bustamante A, Ortega AN. Health care expenditures among Asian American subgroups. Medical Care Research and Review, 2013;70(3):310-29.

3. Contributions to Cross-Border Health Care Research:

Vargas Bustamante A, Ojeda G, Castaneda X. Willingness to pay for cross-border health insurance between the United States and Mexico. Health Affairs, 2008;27(1):169-78.

Laugesen MJ, Vargas-Bustamante A. A patient mobility framework that travels: European and United States-Mexican comparisons. Health Policy, 2010;97(2-3):225-31.

Vargas Bustamante A, Laugesen M, Caban M, Rosenau P.  United States-Mexico cross-border health insurance initiatives: Salud Migrante and medicare in Mexico. Pan American Journal of Public Health, 2012;31(1):74-80.

Gonzalez Block MA, Vargas Bustamante A, de la Sierra LA, Martinez Cardoso A. Redressing the limitations of the affordable care act for Mexican immigrants through bi-national health insurance: a willingness to pay study in Los Angeles. Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health / Center for Minority Public Health, 2014;16(2):179-88.

4. Contributions to Comparative Health Systems Research:

Vargas Bustamante A.  The tradeoff between centralized and decentralized health services: evidence from rural areas in Mexico. Social Science & Medicine, 2010;71(5):925-34.

Vargas Bustamante AComparing federal and state healthcare provider performance in villages targeted by the conditional cash transfer programme of Mexico. Tropical Medicine & International Health: TM & IH, 2011;16(10):1251-9.

Vargas-Bustamante A. Menu labeling perception & health behaviors between immigrant and U.S.-born minority populations: assessment in two Los Angeles public marketsSalud Pública, 2013;55 Suppl 4:S515-22.

Vargas Bustamante A, Mendez CA. Healthcare privatization in Latin America: what explains diverging healthcare privatization policies in Chile, Colombia and MexicoJournal of Health Care Politics, Policy and the Law, 2014;39(4):841-86.

Jack Needleman

Jack Needleman, PhD, FAAN, is a Professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health and Associate Director of the UCLA Patient Safety Institute. He teaches courses in health policy analysis and American political institutions and health policy in the master’s programs and research design and research methods to doctoral and MS students, and has previously taught program and policy evaluation. He received his Ph.D. in Public Policy from Harvard University.

Dr. Needleman’s research focuses on the impact of changing markets and public policy on quality and access to care, and health care provider and insurer responses to market and regulatory incentives. For the past decade, Dr. Needleman’s research has focused on studies of quality and staffing in hospitals and on the evaluation and design of performance improvement activities.  Three of Dr. Needleman’s first authored publications on quality of care and nurse staffing are designated patient safety classics by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Quality measures he developed have been adopted by AHRQ, Medicare, Joint Commission, and National Quality Forum and his expertise developing, testing and refining quality measures has been tapped by these and other organizations. He was lead evaluator for the Robert Wood Johnson initiative Transforming Care at the Bedside and serves on the Steering Council for the NIH-funded Improvement Science Research Network.

Dr. Needleman’s research extends beyond nursing. He has directed projects on a wide range of topics, including studies of for-profit and nonprofit hospitals, the impact of community health centers on hospitalizations for ambulatory care sensitive conditions, and changes in access to inpatient care for psychiatric conditions and substance abuse. He has had a Robert Wood Johnson Investigator Award to study the future of public hospitals. He studied Canadian provisional systems for paying and regulating hospitals, physicians and supplemental health insurers, and regulating new technology. Prior to coming to UCLA in 2003, Dr. Needleman was on the faculty of the Harvard School of Public Health and before that was Vice President and Co-Director of the Public Policy Practice at Lewin/ICF, a Washington health policy research and consulting firm. While at Lewin/ICF, he conducted studies and served as a consultant to numerous state and federal task forces examining health care costs and access to care, and evaluated or helped design payment systems for hospitals, physicians and nursing homes.

Dr. Needleman’s research on the impact of nurse staffing and nurses’ working conditions on patient outcomes in hospitals and the business case for increasing nurse staffing received the first AcademyHealth Health Services Research Impact Award. In 2007, he was inducted as an honorary Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing.  He is an elected member of the Institute of Medicine.

Education: 

PhD, Harvard University

Selected Publications: 

Needleman, Jack, Peter I. Buerhaus, Catherine Vanderboom and Marcelline Harris. “Using Present-on-Admission Coding to Improve Exclusion Rules for Quality Metrics: The Case of Failure-to-Rescue.”  Medical Care. 2013; 51(8):722-30. doi: 10.1097/MLR.0b013e31829808de

Needleman, Jack. “Assessing Low Mortality in Magnet Hospitals.” Medical Care. 2013; 51(5): 379-81.

Wyte-Lake, Tamar, Kim Tran, Candice C. Bowman, Jack Needleman and Aram Dobalian. “A Systematic Review of Strategies to Address the Clinical Nursing Faculty Shortage.” Journal of Nursing Education. 2013; 52(5):245-252.

Needleman, Jack, Peter Buerhaus, V. Shane Pankratz, Cynthia L. Leibson, Susanna R. Stevens and Marcelline Harris.  “Nurse Staffing and Inpatient Hospital Mortality.” New England Journal of Medicine. 2011; 364(11):1037-45 [AHRQ Designated Patient Safety Classic]

Yee, Tracy, Jack Needleman, Marjorie Pearson, and Patricia Parkerton. “Nurse manager perceptions of the impact of process improvements by nurses.” Journal of Nursing Care Quality 2011; 26 (3):226-35.

Needleman, Jack, and Ann F. Minnick. “Response to Commentary: What Conclusions Can We Draw from Recent Analyses of Anesthesia Provider Model and Patient Outcomes?” Health Services Research 2010; 45 (5):1397-1406.

Needleman, Jack, Patricia H. Parkerton, Marjorie L. Pearson, Lynn M. Soban, Valda V. Upenieks and Tracy Yee. “Impacts on the Learning Community Hospitals of Transforming Care at the Bedside.” American Journal of Nursing 2009; 109(11 Suppl):59-65.

Needleman, Jack. “Is What’s Good for the Patient Good for the Hospital? Aligning Incentives and the Business Case for Nursing.” Journal of Politics, Policy and Nursing Care 2008;  9(2):80-7

Needleman, Jack, Ellen T. Kurtzman, and Kenneth W. Kizer. “Performance Measurement of Nursing Care: State of the Science and the Current Consensus.” Medical Care Research and Review 64, no. 2S (2007): 10S-43S.

Needleman, Jack, Peter I. Buerhaus, Maureen Stewart, Katya Zelevinsky, and Soeren Mattke. “Nurse Staffing in Hospitals: Is There a Business Case for Quality?” Health Affairs 25, no. 1 (2006): 204-11. [AHRQ Designated Patient Safety Classic]

Berney, Barbara, and Jack Needleman. “Impact of Nursing Overtime on Nurse Sensitive Patient Outcomes in New York Hospitals, 1995-2000.” Policy, Politics & Nursing Practice 7, no. 2 (2006): 87-100.

Falik, Marilyn, Jack Needleman, Robert Herbert, Barbara Wells, Robert Politzer, and M. Beth Benedict. “Comparative Effectiveness of Health Centers as Regular Source of Care: Application of Sentinel Acsc Events as Performance Measures.” Journal of Ambulatory Care Management 29, no. 1 (2006): 24-35.

Bazzoli, Gloria J., Richard C. Lindrooth, Romana Hasnain-Wynia, and Jack Needleman. “The Balanced Budget Act of 1997 and U.S. Hospital Operations.” Inquiry 41, no. 4 (2004): 401-17.

Needleman, Jack, Peter Buerhaus, Soeren Mattke, Maureen Stewart and Katya Zelevinsky, “Measuring Hospital Quality: Can Medicare Data Substitute for All Payer Data?.” Health Services Research 2003; 38(6):1487-1508.

Buerhaus, Peter and Jack Needleman, Soeren Mattke and Maureen Stewart, “Strengthening Hospital Nursing.” Health Affairs 2002; 21(5):123-132.

Needleman, Jack, Peter Buerhaus, Soeren Mattke, Maureen Stewart and Katya Zelevinsky, “Nurse-Staffing Levels and the Quality of Care in Hospitals,” New England Journal of Medicine 2002; 346(22): 1715-1722. Abstracted in The Yearbook of Anesthesiology and Pain Management 2003. [AHRQ Designated Patient Safety Classic]

Needleman, Jack, “The Role of Nonprofits in Health Care,” Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law 2001; 26(5):1043-1060.

Marilyn Falik, Jack Needleman, Barbara L.Wells, and Jodi Korb, “Ambulatory Care Sensitive Hospitalizations and Emergency Visits: Experiences of Medicaid Patients Using Federally Qualified Health Centers,” Medical Care 2001; 39(6):551-561.

Needleman, Jack, JoAnn Lamphere and Deborah Chollet, “Uncompensated Care and Hospital Conversions in Florida,” Health Affairs 1999; 18(4):125-133.

Needleman, Jack, “Nonprofit to For-Profit Conversions by Hospitals, Health Insurers, and Health Plans,” Public Health Reports 1999; 114(2):108-119.

Needleman, Jack, Chollet, Deborah J., and Lamphere, JoAnn, “Conversions of Public and Not-for-Profit Hospitals to For-Profit Status,” Health Affairs, 1997; 16(2):187-195.

Needleman, Jack, “Sources and Policy Implications of Uncertainty in Risk Assessment.” Statistical Science: A Review Journal of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics 1988; 3:328-338.

Bailar, John C., III, Jack Needleman, Barbara Berney and J. Michael McGuiness, editors, Assessing Risks to Health: Methodological Approaches. Westport, CT: Auburn House, 1993.

 

Gerald Kominski

Gerald Kominski is a Professor of Health Policy and Management and a Senior Fellow at the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research. His research focuses on evaluating the costs and financing of public insurance programs, including Medicare, Medicaid, Workers’ Compensation. He is also working extensively on evaluating the expected and actual impacts of health care reform and has co-led the development of a microsimulation model (CalSIM) for forecasting eligibility, enrollment, and expenditures under health reform. He currently serves as PI of several multi-year evaluations of Medicaid 1115 waiver demonstration projects in California involving disease management for fee-for-service Medi-Cal beneficiaries and expansion of coverage for low-income uninsured adults otherwise ineligible for Medi-Cal through county-based indigent care programs. From 2003-2009, he served as Vice Chair for the Cost Impact Analysis Team of the California Health Benefits Review Program (CHBRP), which conducts legislative analyses for the California legislature of proposals to expand mandated insurance benefits. From 2001-2008, he was Associate Dean for Academic Programs at the UCLA School of Public Health.

Dr. Kominski received his Ph.D. in public policy analysis from the University of Pennsylvania Wharton School in 1985, and his A.B. from the University of Chicago in 1978. Prior to joining the faculty at UCLA in 1989, he served for three and a half years as a staff member of the agency now known as the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission (MedPAC). He is co-author of over 120 articles and reports, and is editor of the widely used textbook, Changing the U.S. Health Care System:  Key Issues in Health Services Policy and Management, which will be published in its 4th edition in 2014.

Selected Publications:

Kominski GF (ed.). Changing the U.S. Health Care System: Key Issues in Health Services Policy and Management, 4th Edition, San Francisco: Wiley and Sons, 2014.

Roby DH, Jacobs K, Kertzner AE, Kominski GF. California health policy research program - supporting policy making through evidence and responsive research. Journal of Health Politics, Policy, and Law 2014; 34(4):887-900.

Davis AC, Watson G, Pourat N, Kominski GF, Roby DH. Disparities in CD4 monitoring among HIV-positive Medicaid beneficiaries: Evidence of differential treatment at the point of care. Open Forum Infectious Diseases 2014;1(2):42.

Pourat N, Davis AC, Chen X, Vrungos S, Kominski GF. In California, primary care continuity was associated with reduced emergency department use and fewer hospitalizations. Health Affairs 2015;34(7):1113-1120.

Jones AL, Cochran SD, Leibowitz A, Wells KB, Kominski GF, Mays VM. Usual primary care provider characteristics of a patient-centered medical home and mental health service use. J Gen Intern Med 2015; 30(12):1828-1836.

Gans D, Hadler M, Chen X, Wu SH, Dimand R, Abramson JM, Diamant AL, Kominski GF. Impact of a pediatric palliative care program on the caregiver experience. Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing 2015;17(6):559-565.

Lucia L, Dietz M, Jacobs K, Chen X, Kominski GF. Which Californians will Lack Health Insurance under the Affordable Care Act?Berkeley, CA: UC Berkeley Center for Labor Research and Education and UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, January 2015.

Meng YY, Diamant A, Jones J, Lin W, Chen X, Wu SH, Pourat N, Roby D, Kominski GF. Racial and ethnic disparities in diabetes care and impact of vendor-based disease management programs. Diabetes Care 2016;39(5):743-749.

Gans D, Hadler MW, Chen X, Wu S, Dimand R, Abramson JM, Ferrell B, Diamant AL, Kominski GF. Cost analysis and policy implications of a pediatric palliative care program. Journal of Pain and Symptom Management 2016; 52(3):329-335.

Labovitz JM, Kominski GF. Forecasting the value of podiatric medical care in newly insured diabetic patients during implementation of the Affordable Care Act in California. Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association 2016; 106( 3):163-171.

Sorenson A, Nonzee NJ, Kominski GF. Public Funds Account for Over 70 Percent of Health Care Spending in California. Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, August 2016.

Mager-Mardeusz H, Kominski GF. More than 400,000 Californians with Developmental Disabilities Remain Outside the State Safety Net. Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, November 2016.

Dietz M, Lucia L, Kominski GF, Jacobs K. ACA Repeal in California: Who Stands to Lose? Berkeley, CA: UC Berkeley Center for Labor Research and Education and UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, December 2016.

Kominski GF, Nonzee NJ, Sorensen A. The Affordable Care Act’s impacts on access to insurance and health care for low-income populations. Annual Review of Public Health 2017; 38:489–505.

Latoya Small

Latoya Small’s scholarship is informed by her work in clinical social work practice and community-based research.

Her research focuses on health disparities, specifically, the intersection of mental health, treatment adherence, and HIV among women and children in the U.S. and Sub-Saharan Africa. Her global research addresses the urgent need for theory-driven, empirically-informed, and sustainable psychosocial HIV treatment approaches for youth living with perinatally acquired HIV in South Africa.

In the U.S., Dr. Small examines how poverty-related stress, parenting, and mental health interact and relatedly impact adherence in HIV medical services among Black and Latina women in urban communities. An extension of her work includes mental health and discrimination facing transgender women of color.

Dr. Small takes a collaborative approach in her scholarship, recognizing that traditional intra-disciplinary boundaries can impede the development of effective and sustainable research interventions. Her work aims to produce accessible, evidence-informed interventions that bolster youth development and women’s health.

Kenya L. Covington

Kenya L. Covington conducts empirical research that examines social and economic inequality associated with the structural makeup of metropolitan areas. Her work suggests ways to better utilize social and urban policies that likely mitigate disparities in economic opportunity and well-being overall.

For over a decade she was professor of urban studies and planning at California State University Northridge and concluded her tenure as full professor. In 2015 she was named Distinguished Teacher of the Year.

Professor Covington teaches courses on Housing Policy, Introduction to Public Policy, Research Methods, Forces of Urbanization, Social Inequality and Urban Poverty. She joined the Public Policy faculty at the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs in 2017. 

Dr. Covington actively participates in APPAM, Urban Affairs, ACSP and the Population Association of America. Over her career, Dr. Covington’s articles have appeared in the Journal of Urban Studies, Brookings Institution Policy Briefs, Journal of Urban Affairs, the International Journal on Economic Development, the Harvard Journal on Legislation, the National Urban League’s 2003 and 2004 publication titled The State of Black America, and The Review of Black Political Economy, among other publications.

Khush Cooper

Khush Cooper, MSW, PhD. is an Adjunct Assistant Professor at the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs as well as a consultant to public child welfare systems and private child welfare organizations in the areas of foster care reform, LGBTQ youth in systems, implementation science, and leadership. Dr. Cooper teaches Child Welfare Research, Leadership, Public Policy for Children and Youth, and Macro Practice at the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs at UCLA and is a foster care subject matter advisor to the UCLA Williams Institute, a nationally renowned LGBT research and policy analysis center. She received her MSW (2000) and PhD (2010) in Social Work from Luskin.

 

Her research projects include the California Residentially-Based Services (RBS) Demonstration Project which tested new models for the provision of residential treatment to foster children across four jurisdictions, which models influenced AB 403 Continuum of Care Reform – the largest overhaul of California’s child welfare system in 30 years; the RISE Project, a $13 million, federally-funded 5-year demonstration project which developed evidence-based practices and a rigorously evaluated training curriculum aimed at reducing barriers to permanency for LGBTQ youth in foster care; the Los Angeles Foster Youth Study, the first empirical study to determine the disproportionality of LGBTQ youth in a large urban child welfare system; and the LA LGBTQ Youth Preparedness Scan which used a preparedness framework (as opposed to a cultural competence framework) to analyze the eleven youth-relevant Los Angeles County departments’ capacity to properly serve LGBTQ children, youth and families.

 

Additionally, as a social entrepreneur and specialist in the study and implementation science, Dr. Cooper has cultivated long-standing relationships with policymakers, leading practitioners, and consumers to shield and guide California’s child welfare organizations, both public and private, through reform initiatives. Her credibility in the child welfare field is further enhanced by her years of direct practice experience in foster care, residential treatment and community adolescent service settings. She has deployed performance management systems for large multi-site child welfare and mental health provision organizations; designed practical implementation support and readiness initiatives with regard to state and federal legislative mandates (such as the Title IV-E Waiver Demonstration Project and the Families First Prevention Services Act; and currently is an adjunct member of the Implementation Collaborative within Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago as well as CQI subject matter expert utilized widely by Casey Family Programs.

 

Michael Fleming

Michael Fleming is the Executive Director of the David Bohnett Foundation – a grant making foundation charged with “improving society through social activism”. Since 2000, he has shepherded more than $125 million dollars to organizations and institutions that share the foundation’s goals and vision.

Michael has been appointed to boards and commissions at every level of government.  In 2021, Governor Gavin Newsom named him as one of his two appointees to the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum Commission, a Joint Powers Authority between the City of Los Angeles, the County of Los Angeles, and the State of California. From 2018 to 2022, he was a member of the Board of Directors of the Getty House Foundation, dedicated to civic education, community engagement, and the preservation of Getty House, the official residence of the Mayor of Los Angeles.

From 2013 to 2017, Michael served on the Los Angeles Board of Water and Power Commissioners – the five member panel that oversees the nation’s largest public utility. He previously served as the President of the East Los Angeles Area Planning Commission and as a Commissioner on the Board of the Los Angeles Convention Center. In 2010, President Barack Obama named Fleming to the White House Council for Community Solutions.

Michael sits on the boards of numerous non-profit organizations including The Carr Center at Harvard Kennedy School, The University of Limerick’s Kemmy School, and public radio powerhouse KCRW, where he served as Chairman of the Board and Co-Chair of their capital campaign.  Since 2003, he’s been an adjunct professor of organizational development and public policy at UCLA, a member of the LGBTQ Studies Faculty Advisory Committee, and, in 2023 was awarded the Student’s Choice Outstanding Faculty Award at UCLA’s 25th annual Lavender Graduation.  From 2013 to 2016 Michael was also an adjunct professor of public policy at NYU.

Michael is married to California Court of Appeal Justice Luis A. Lavin.

 

Michael is currently teaching:

  • Politics, Power, and Philanthropy (Public Policy M227, Social Welfare M290S, Urban Planning M287) – Winter
  • Institutions & Organizations (LGBTQ Studies 180XP) – Spring

Monica Blauner

Monica Blauner, LCSW is a graduate of Smith College School for Social Work 1979, and earned a certificate in psychoanalysis from the New York Freudian Society Psychoanalytic Training Institute. She is currently in private practice in Los Angeles, and has worked at all levels of care in mental health and substance abuse treatment. She has led an Integrative Seminar for Smith College School for Social Work students placed in Los Angeles and taught at The Psychoanalytic Training Institute of the New York Counseling Center and Metropolitan Institute for Training in Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy. She is dedicated to teaching foundational clinical skills, including client engagement, understanding unconscious process and using the therapeutic relationship.

 

Gregory Pierce

Greg Pierce (he/him) is the Research and Co-Executive Director of the UCLA Luskin Center for Innovation and the director of the Human Right to Water Solutions Lab. He is also the director of the UCLA Water Resources Group within the Institute of the Environment and Sustainability, and serves as an adjunct associate professor in the department of urban planning. He is a faculty affiliate of the Lewis Center for Regional Studies and Institute of Transportation Studies in the Luskin School, and Center for Healthy Climate Solutions in the Fielding School of Public Health.

Dr. Pierce’s research, teaching and service is motivated by persistent inequities in access to the essential environmental services that we need to survive and thrive. He examines how infrastructure planning and policy efforts either perpetuate or address service inequities, and demonstrates how communities strategically cope with and overcome inequities. His primary focus is on water insecurity, but he also examines solutions to cross-cutting green infrastructure, climate resilience and transport insecurities.

He has secured 40+ extramural research funding awards as a principal investigator at the Center for Innovation. Current and past sponsors of this work include the California State Water Resources Control Board, the California Air Resources Board, the Strategic Growth Council, the U.S. Housing and Urban Development Department, WaterAid, the Water Foundation, The Resources Legacy Fund, the World Bank, the UC Multicampus Research Initiative, the UC Institute of Transportation Studies and the UCLA Grand Challenge, LADWP and Los Angeles County.

Pierce is an author or co-author of 50+ peer-reviewed articles, including many in the leading journals in urban studies, infrastructure planning and policy and environmental health, as well as 20+ major Luskin Center for Innovation reports. He has also reviewed articles for 50+ journals, several funding agencies and many collaborating researchers. Pierce received a PhD in urban planning in 2015 and an MA in urban planning in 2011, both from UCLA. For more information regarding his peer-reviewed research, see here. For Pierce’s full CV, see here.

 

Jody Heymann

Dr. Heymann established and will continue to lead the first global initiative to examine health and social policy in all 193 UN nations. This initiative provides an in-depth look at how health and social policies affect the ability of individuals, families and communities to meet their health needs across the economic and social spectrum worldwide. In addition to carrying out award-winning global social policy research, Heymann carried out some of the original studies on the risk of HIV transmission via breast milk to infants in Africa, the impact of HIV/AIDS on tuberculosis rates in Africa, and how labor conditions impact the health and welfare of families globally.

She has authored and edited more than 200 publications, including 15 books. These include Changing Children’s Chances(Harvard University Press, 2013), Making Equal Rights Real (Cambridge University Press, 2012), Lessons in Educational Equality (Oxford University Press, 2012), Protecting Childhood in the AIDS Pandemic (Oxford University Press, 2012), Profit at the Bottom of the Ladder (Harvard Business Press, 2010), Raising the Global Floor (Stanford University Press, 2009),Trade and Health (McGill Queens University Press, 2007), Forgotten Families (Oxford University Press, 2006), Healthier Societies (Oxford University Press, 2006), Unfinished Work (New Press, 2005), Global Inequalities at Work (Oxford University Press, 2003), and The Widening Gap (Basic Books, 2000).

Deeply committed to translating research into policies and programs that improve individual and population health, Dr. Heymann has worked with government leaders in North America, Europe, Africa and Latin America as well as a wide range of intergovernmental organizations including the World Health Organization, the International Labor Organization, the World Economic Forum, UNICEF and UNESCO. Central to her efforts is bridging the gap between research and policymakers. She has helped develop legislation with the U.S. Congress as well as with UN agencies based on the implications of her team’s research results. Dr. Heymann’s findings have been featured on CNN Headline News; MSNBC; Good Morning America; Fox News; National Public Radio’s “All Things Considered,” “Fresh Air” and “Marketplace;” in The New York TimesWashington Post; Los Angeles Times; Business Week; Inc; Portfolio; Forbes India and USA Today, among other internationally and nationally syndicated programs and press.