Posts

Diaz on De León’s Mayoral Campaign

Sonja Diaz, director of the UCLA Latino Policy and Politics Initiative, spoke to the Los Angeles Times about L.A. City Councilman Kevin de León’s campaign for mayor. De León, who was the first Latino ever to lead the state Senate, is currently running in third place behind front-runners Rick Caruso and Karen Bass. “With his legislative record and working-class immigrant success story, De León would be leading the race if he were spending like Caruso,” Diaz said. “His policy acumen is bar none … whether it’s climate change, pension reform or immigrant rights.” While Caruso has spent nearly $30 million on his campaign so far, De León has spent about $2 million. Despite his limited funding, De León is continuing to fight to be in the two-person general election runoff. To increase his chances, De León’s campaign will be pushing to get a large Latino turnout for the June 7 primary. 


Yaroslavsky on Shifts in the L.A. Mayor’s Race

Zev Yaroslavsky, director of the Los Angeles Initiative at UCLA Luskin, spoke to CBSLA News about a new poll showing Rick Caruso and Karen Bass leading the pack in the contest to become Los Angeles’ next mayor. After an early media blitz, Caruso’s poll numbers have tripled, with 24% of respondents expressing their support, just ahead of Bass’ 23%. Yaroslavsky said the trajectory of the race will shift as other candidates step up their marketing campaigns. “Karen Bass hasn’t been on television at all. Kevin de León can’t be discounted, hasn’t been on television at all. … So, it will change, I’m sure, in the weeks ahead,” he said. The race also stands to tighten as undecided voters make their choices as the June 7 primary nears, he said. “Most people don’t know all that they want to know about the candidates. Forty percent don’t know enough to make a decision at this point or they are withholding their judgment until they hear more.” 

Yaroslavsky on Tipping Point of Homelessness

Zev Yaroslavsky, director of the Los Angeles Initiative at UCLA Luskin, spoke to USA Today about the growing issue of homelessness in Los Angeles and the role that it will play in the city’s upcoming mayoral election. The homelessness crisis has grown and is now visible in parks, on sidewalks and at freeway underpasses. Experts estimate that there are at least 40,000 unhoused people in Los Angeles, and a Los Angeles Times poll found that 94% of respondents considered homelessness a serious or very serious problem. “This problem has been around for a long time, [but] we’re past the tipping point now, the political tipping point,” Yaroslavsky said. “This is as potent a political issue as there is in the election coming forward.” The article cited a report from the UCLA Luskin Institute on Inequality and Democracy that estimated that 1,500 people without homes died in Los Angeles between March 2020 and July 2021. 


Diaz on Caruso’s Entry Into the L.A. Mayor’s Race

Sonja Diaz, executive director of the UCLA Latino Policy and Politics Initiative, spoke to the Los Angeles Times and New York Times about billionaire developer Rick Caruso’s entry into the race for L.A. mayor. Caruso has said that elected politicians have failed voters on issues such as homelessness and crime. His résumé, which includes serving as head of the city’s Police Commission and chairman of the board of trustees of the University of Southern California, evokes an older generation of Los Angeles power brokers. Diaz said the success of any mayoral candidate will depend, at least in part, on the ability to appeal to Latino voters. “Obviously, COVID-19 has had a disparate impact on Latino households in this city,” she told the L.A. Times. “So a mayor is going to have to articulate a policy agenda that centers Latino workers and Latino households in ways that they can remain in the city and not just survive but thrive.”


 

Matute, Taylor on Prospective Promotion for Garcetti

Director Brian Taylor and Deputy Director Juan Matute of the UCLA Institute of Transportation Studies spoke to the Los Angeles Times about the possibility that Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti will be appointed to a Cabinet post in the Biden administration. After serving as national co-chair of President-elect Joe Biden’s campaign, Garcetti is a potential candidate for transportation secretary. While Garcetti has only held local office, Taylor noted that he would not be the first mayor to run the federal department of transportation. Taylor added that big-city mayors like Garcetti have to know how to pull federal, state and local resources together, along with political will, to get transportation projects moving. Matute acknowledged the success of Measure M as Garcetti’s signature legacy but said he wished he “had more success in the implementation of his vision for a better Los Angeles,” given the mayor’s grasp of the intricacies of transportation planning.


Yaroslavsky and Newton Weigh In on Garcetti’s Record

Los Angeles Initiative Director Zev Yaroslavsky and lecturer Jim Newton were featured in a Forward article highlighting the successes and shortcomings of Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, who is reportedly being considered for a Cabinet appointment in the Joe Biden administration. Garcetti established his reputation as a mayor who could get things done after he signed a $15 minimum wage into law in 2015 and with the 2016 passage of Measure M, which expanded public transit and bike networks. “Today, no county in America has so much local money invested in building transportation infrastructure as L.A. County has,” Yaroslavsky said. “He has a considerable record under his belt in that regard.” However, critics point out Garcetti’s failures to address homelessness and traffic congestion. “I’m one of the people who wanted to see him be more ambitious and swing higher,” Newton said. “I don’t think homelessness is his fault, … but I also don’t believe he can point to much evidence that he’s succeeded.”


Newton on Garcetti’s Steady Response to Crisis

Jim Newton, lecturer of public policy, spoke to the Washington Post about Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti’s approach to managing the city’s response to the coronavirus pandemic. Garcetti has made it a priority to be well-versed in all the numbers, he said. “I think the book on Garcetti, correctly, has been that he is smart, articulate, principled, kind of an incrementalist and cautious,” Newton said. “And so what I think all of that has added up to — up to this point, anyway — is a kind of steady but unspectacular time as mayor.” As pressure has increased to reopen the economy, Garcetti’s decision-making process has been driven by cautious reason. Newton explained that the coronavirus pandemic is “the sort of crisis well-suited to [Garcetti’s] strengths: He is smart, good with data, comfortable with science. There’s no blaming. There’s no ridiculousness. It’s very steady and even and straightforward.”


Yaroslavsky Sees Tectonic Shift in Los Angeles History

In a Los Angeles Times article, Los Angeles Initiative Director Zev Yaroslavsky weighed in on Mayor Eric Garcetti’s proposal to redistribute funding from police to communities. After decades of efforts to expand the Los Angeles Police Department with the aim of making the city safer, the news proposal would direct $250 million from other city operations to youth jobs, health initiatives and “peace centers” to heal trauma, with as much as $150 million coming from the LAPD. The proposal comes in response to widespread demands that the government provide poor and minority communities with more than a police presence following the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis. “If you look at the arc of the city’s history for three decades, there is a tectonic shift here with this growing constituency for reform,” Yaroslavsky said. “There is the emergence of this multiracial coalition of people, who have formed a powerful constituency, and they are making their voices heard.”


Events

Meet the Mayoral Candidates Series: Mike Feuer

The UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs is a promotional partner with the Los Angeles World Affairs Council and Town Hall for a series of events relating to the upcoming election of a new mayor for Los Angeles.

The series will continue at 6:30 p.m., Tuesday, March 15, with a session featuring candidate Mike Feuer, the Los Angeles city attorney.

This event and other sessions in the series will feature the major candidates live, in front of a public audience, to discuss why they are qualified to be Los Angeles’ next leader.

Feuer has been L.A.’s chief lawyer and prosecutor since July 2013. According to his bio on the city attorney’s website, he has brought an innovative, problem-solving focus that combines fair and effective prosecution with initiatives to improve public safety and the quality of life throughout the city. Feuer’s office also has been at the forefront of key national issues ranging from gun violence prevention and consumer protection to justice system reform and successful challenges to Trump Administration policies relating to public safety, and the fair allocation of federal funding and political representation.

Each session in the series features a live audience Q&A moderated by series host Dan Schnur, a professor of political science and former political consultant.

Sessions are free of charge with registration; proof of vaccination for COVID-19 is also required.

Free of charge with REGISTRATION


CORONAVIRUS SAFETY PROTOCOLS: The Ebell of Los Angeles has a visitor policy in accordance with the City of Los Angeles vaccination ordinance. In order to attend this event, all visitors ages 12 and up are required to show proof of full COVID-19 vaccination along with a valid ID.

PARKING: There is free parking for guests of The Ebell of Los Angeles at the lot located on Lucerne Boulevard, directly across from the venue. ADA parking is available in The Ebell of Los Angeles lot located on Fremont Place.


CO-SPONSORS FOR THE SERIES

Register Now

Meet the Mayoral Candidates Series: Karen Bass

The UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs is a promotional partner with the Los Angeles World Affairs Council and Town Hall for a series of events relating to the upcoming election of a new mayor for Los Angeles.

The series will continue at 6:30 p.m., Tuesday, May 24, with a session featuring candidate U.S. Rep. Karen Bass.

This event and other sessions in the series feature the major candidates live, in front of a public audience, to discuss why they are qualified to be Los Angeles’ next leader.

The six-term congresswoman from Los Angeles represents the 37th Congressional District, serving on the House Committee on Foreign Affairs where she is the chair of the Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, and Global Human Rights. She also serves on the House Judiciary Subcommittee on Crime and Terrorism, where she is active in working to craft sound criminal justice reform policies. She was chair of the Congressional Black Caucus in 2019 and 2020. Her political career also includes experience in Sacramento as a member of the California State Assembly. Bass made history in 2008 by becoming the first African-American woman in U.S. history to serve as speaker of any state legislature. Prior to elected office, she founded Community Coalition, a community-based social justice organization that empowers the African-American and Latino community across generations to address substance abuse, poverty and crime in South Los Angeles

Each session in the series features a live audience Q&A moderated by series host Dan Schnur, a professor of political science and former political consultant.

Sessions are free with registration; proof of vaccination for COVID-19 is also required.

Free of charge with REGISTRATION


CORONAVIRUS SAFETY PROTOCOLS: The Ebell of Los Angeles has a visitor policy in accordance with the City of Los Angeles vaccination ordinance. In order to attend this event, all visitors ages 12 and up are required to show proof of full COVID-19 vaccination along with a valid ID.

PARKING: There is free parking for guests of The Ebell of Los Angeles at the lot located on Lucerne Boulevard, directly across from the venue. ADA parking is available in The Ebell of Los Angeles lot located on Fremont Place.


CO-SPONSORS FOR THE SERIES

 

 

 

 

 

 

Register Now

 

 

 

 

 

Luskin Summit: Closing Sessions

Luskin Summit 2022 will wrap up at the Centennial Ballroom of the Luskin Conference Center on the UCLA campus.

QUALITY OF LIFE INDEX

Zev Yaroslavsky, a former elected official and current UCLA professor, will unveil the results of his seventh annual poll of Los Angeles County residents on their satisfaction with their lives across nine categories. ABC7 news anchor Phillip Palmer will moderate.


STATE OF CALIFORNIA

Luskin Summit 2022 will close with an in-person discussion featuring Gray Davis and Pete Wilson, former governors of California, led by UCLA’s Jim Newton. They will explore topics such as the economy and jobs, environmental issues, public safety and more.


Remote access: Those who cannot attend in person will be able to participate virtually at www.luskin.ucla.edu.

REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED AND UCLA’S HEALTH AND SAFETY PROTOCOLS FOR CAMPUS EVENTS WILL BE ENFORCED.

AGENDA

9:15 a.m. | Event Check-in and Breakfast

9:45 a.m. | Session 1: Quality of Life Index

11:00 a.m. | Session 2: State of California

12:00 p.m. | Event concludes

TRANSPORTATION

Public Transportation: Blue Bus and Metro

Ride-hailing Zones: Uber/Lyft designated locations available, for nearby locations and map visit bit.ly/uclaridehailing

PARKING

Self-parking is available underneath the Luskin Conference Center and in UCLA Parking Structure 8, Level 4, directly across the street from the center. There is a convenient pedestrian walkway/bridge connecting Parking Structure 8 (on Level 3) to the Luskin Conference Center property. Please note that there is a fee to park in either location.

Meet the Mayoral Candidates Series: Joe Buscaino

The UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs is a promotional partner with the Los Angeles World Affairs Council and Town Hall for a series of events relating to the upcoming election of a new mayor for Los Angeles.

The series will kick off at 6:30 p.m., Tuesday, Feb. 15, with a session featuring candidate Joe Buscaino, a member of the Los Angeles City Council.

This event and future sessions in the series will feature the major candidates live, in front of a public audience, to discuss why they are qualified to be Los Angeles’ next leader.

Councilman Buscaino represents the 15th District, which includes the communities of Harbor City, Harbor Gateway, San Pedro, Watts and Wilmington, as well as the Port of Los Angeles. He has served as the chair of the City’s Trade, Travel and Tourism Committee since 2017. The committee oversees the Port of Los Angeles — the busiest container port in the United States— as well as LAX, the second-busiest airport in the United States, plus the L.A. Tourism and Convention Board.

Each session will feature a live audience Q&A, moderated by series host Dan Schnur, a professor of political science and former political consultant.

Sessions are free of charge with registration; proof of vaccination for COVID-19 is also required.

Free of charge with REGISTRATION


CORONAVIRUS SAFETY PROTOCOLS: The Ebell of Los Angeles has a visitor policy in accordance with the City of Los Angeles vaccination ordinance. In order to attend this event, all visitors ages 12 and up are required to show proof of full COVID-19 vaccination along with a valid ID.

PARKING: There is free parking for guests of The Ebell of Los Angeles at the lot located on Lucerne Boulevard, directly across from the venue. ADA parking is available in The Ebell of Los Angeles lot located on Fremont Place.


CO-SPONSORS FOR THE SERIES

Register Now