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Pollution Doesn’t Care About Your Politics, de León Writes

Kevin de León, former president pro tempore of the California State Senate and current policymaker-in-residence and senior analyst at UCLA Luskin, co-authored an opinion piece with former California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger in the Sacramento Bee stressing the urgency of combating climate change and pollution in California. Air pollution in the Central Valley and Los Angeles has increased asthma attacks, emergency room visits and premature deaths, according to the 20th annual State of the Air report published by the American Lung Association. Despite coming from opposite sides of the political spectrum, de León and Schwarzenegger agree that “asthma and other lung diseases have no party affiliation.” The effects of climate change on air quality can be seen in increasing smog, ozone pollution and frequency of wildfires. Schwarzenegger and de León propose “aggressively cutting transportation pollution,” concluding that “protecting our citizens should be a cause everyone can get behind, no matter where they fall on the political spectrum.”


DeShazo and Callahan Recommend Expansion of Housing and Transportation Choices

JR DeShazo and Colleen Callahan, the director and deputy director of the UCLA Luskin Center for Innovation, co-authored an article in Capitol Weekly outlining their recommendations for incorporating housing and transportation choice into climate action policy in California. After successfully passing climate action legislation, politicians are now faced with “the enormous task of meeting these goals,” the authors said. They recommend “bundling climate change solutions with initiatives to ease the housing crisis, transportation problems and income inequality” in order to maximize consumer choice. According to DeShazo and Callahan, “all Californians — including members of low-income and vulnerable communities — deserve choice in terms of where they live, where they work, how they move around and how they power their lives.” They conclude with their hopes to “ease housing and transportation burdens while cutting greenhouse gas emissions and expand choice for all Californians.”